"Baseball" A Whole New Ballgame (TV Episode 1994) Poster

(TV Mini-Series)

(1994)

John Chancellor: Narrator

Quotes 

  • Narrator : In October of 1969, veteran centerfielder Curt Flood of the St. Louis Cardinals got word that he was to be traded to Philadelphia. The Phillies were a second-division team known for their hostility toward black players, and Flood did not wish to move his family or to leave his business interests behind.

    Curt Flood : I often wondered what would I do if I were ever traded, because it had happened many, many times. It was, in quote, "part of the game." And then suddenly, it happened to me. I was leaving one of the greatest organizations in the world to, at that time, what was probably the least-liked. And, by God, this is America. And I'm a human being. I'm not a piece of property. I'm not a consignment of goods.

    Narrator : Flood did not report to the Phillies' training camp. "I am a man," he told baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn.

    Curt Flood : [reading his letter]  "Dear Mr. Kuhn, after twelve years in the Major Leagues, I do not feel that I am a piece of property to be bought and sold irrespective of my wishes. I believe that any system which produces that result violates my basic rights as a citizen and is inconsistent with the laws of the United States. It is my desire to play baseball in 1970, and I am capable of playing. I have received a contract from the Philadelphia club, but I believe I have the right to consider offers from other clubs before making any decisions. I therefore request that you make known to all Major League clubs my feelings in this matter, and advise them of my availability for the 1970 season. Sincerely, Curt Flood."

    Narrator : The commissioner refused to exempt him from the reserve clause. Flood refused to play, and vowed to take his case all the way to the Supreme Court. The century-old struggle between the owners and the players was approaching a climax.

  • Narrator : In October of 1969, veteran centerfielder Curt Flood of the St. Louis Cardinals got word that he was to be traded to Philadelphia. The Phillies were a second-division team known for their hostility toward black players, and Flood did not wish to move his family or to leave his business interests behind.

    Curt Flood : I often wondered what would I do if I were ever traded, because it had happened many, many times. It was, in quote, "part of the game." And then suddenly, it happened to me. I was leaving one of the greatest organizations in the world to, at that time, what was probably the least-liked. And, by God, this is America. And I'm a human being. I'm not a piece of property. I'm not a consignment of goods.

    Narrator : Flood did not report to the Phillies' training camp. "I am a man," he told baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn.

    Curt Flood : [reading his letter]  "Dear Mr. Kuhn, after twelve years in the Major Leagues, I do not feel that I am a piece of property to be bought and sold irrespective of my wishes. I believe that any system which produces that result violates my basic rights as a citizen and is inconsistent with the laws of the United States. It is my desire to play baseball in 1970, and I am capable of playing. I have received a contract from the Philadelphia club, but I believe I have the right to consider offers from other clubs before making any decisions. I therefore request that you make known to all Major League clubs my feelings in this matter, and advise them of my availability for the 1970 season. Sincerely, Curt Flood."

    Narrator : The commissioner refused to exempt him from the reserve clause. Flood refused to play, and vowed to take his case all the way to the Supreme Court. The century-old struggle between the owners and the players was approaching a climax.

See also

Release Dates | Official Sites | Company Credits | Filming & Production | Technical Specs


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