Twin Peaks (1990–1991)
9.3/10
3,921
19 user 13 critic

Episode #2.22 

Agent Cooper follows Windom Earle and Annie into the depths of the Black Lodge. Big Ed and Norma get a shock when Nadine suffers head trauma. Andrew and Pete unlock Eckhardt's final box and Audrey stages an act of civil disobedience.

Director:

David Lynch

Writers:

Mark Frost (created by), David Lynch (created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Kyle MacLachlan ... Special Agent Dale Cooper
Michael Ontkean ... Sheriff Harry S. Truman
Mädchen Amick ... Shelly Johnson (as Madchen Amick)
Dana Ashbrook ... Bobby Briggs
Richard Beymer ... Benjamin Horne
Lara Flynn Boyle ... Donna Hayward
Sherilyn Fenn ... Audrey Horne
Warren Frost ... Dr. Will Hayward
Peggy Lipton ... Norma Jennings
James Marshall ... James Hurley (credit only)
Everett McGill ... Big Ed Hurley
Jack Nance ... Pete Martell
Kimmy Robertson ... Lucy Moran
Ray Wise ... Leland Palmer
Joan Chen ... Jocelyn Packard (credit only)
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Storyline

Agent Cooper follows Windom Earle and Annie into the depths of the Black Lodge. Big Ed and Norma get a shock when Nadine suffers head trauma. Andrew and Pete unlock Eckhardt's final box and Audrey stages an act of civil disobedience.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Instead of the usual closing credits, the finale features a shot of a coffee cup sitting on the table in the red room. Slowly, the smiling face of Laura Palmer appears in the coffee. See more »

Goofs

When Cooper enters the Black Lodge he is wearing his coat, but when the scene changes and is shown inside the Black Lodge he doesn't. See more »

Quotes

Giant: [talking backwards; subtitled] One and the same.
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Connections

Referenced in Stranger Things: Chapter Eight: The Upside Down (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Sycamore Trees
Lyric by David Lynch
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Performed by Jimmy Scott (as The Legendary Jimmy Scott)
See more »

User Reviews

 
one of the few truly inspired series finales in TV history
9 May 2007 | by Quinoa1984See all my reviews

What a way to go out on a bang! The series finale to Twin Peaks is not only superb as an episode in tying together loose ends in an entertaining way, it transcends what are usually the limitations of the TV medium. David Lynch directed the episode, which is obvious from every single minute that was shot. It's a lot more like the most surreal art-film shot by a European cameraman than your typical prime-time network finale. We see finally, as has been hyped for the previous episodes, the Black Lodge, what could almost be considered the truest form of a haven for the dark side of the universe. Cooper finds that the map will show him how to follow Windam-Earl, who's kidnapped Annie, Cooper's new love, to bring the worst evil imaginable. Passing sycamore trees, we finally enter what is the ultimate labyrinth as dictated by Lynch and company, where we see old "friends" (the Man from Another Room, the room service man at the Great Northern, Laura, Mr. Palmer, the Giant, et all), and see the most frightening outcome imaginable.

In one of Lynch's most staggering displays of bravura directing, the Twin Peaks finale is alternately hysterically funny (the wrap-up of what happens at the bank), dramatically exquisite (the mess over at Donna's), plain goofy in its obviousness (Nadine's come around reminds me of the climax of Muppets Take Manhattan), and absolutely thrilling in how only Lynch and Frost can pull it off. Everything from the lighting- going so over-the-top with the flashing lights and the slow-to-fast pacing- to the sound design, to the completely out-of-this-world turn of performances by everyone in the Black Lodge, it all just clicks so well that it gives one who's already very used to Lynch's wild theatrics the chills. Indeed, the very end left me feeling the same way I did the first times I saw Lynch's best work in Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive: it makes total sense, even if it makes no sense all the same. And yet, the emotional impact is concise, direct, and with a punch that's undeniable. Meanwhile, it's all on TV, not in a cinema, where one would expect to see such artful craft and simple touches of visual wizardry.

Wow, Bob, Wow. That's all I could say once this ended.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 June 1991 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby | Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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