NYPD Blue (1993–2005)
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Brown Appetit 

Janice's policeman father arrives for a visit and tells her about his pending indictment for corruption involving being an informant for Angelo Marino when a book that Marino had on him as ... See full summary »

Director:

Gregory Hoblit

Writers:

David Milch (created by), Steven Bochco (created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
David Caruso ... Det. John Kelly
Dennis Franz ... Det. Andy Sipowicz
James McDaniel ... Lt. Arthur Fancy
Sherry Stringfield ... Laura Michaels Kelly
Amy Brenneman ... Officer Janice Licalsi
Nicholas Turturro ... Det. James Martinez
Wendie Malick ... Susan Wagner
Alan Scarfe ... Thomas Wagner
David Schwimmer ... Josh '4B' Goldstein
Tresa Hughes ... Annette DiLeo
Michael Rapaport ... Jaime DiLeo
Bradford Tatum ... Michael DiLeo
Gordon Clapp ... Det. Greg Medavoy
Ralph Monaco Ralph Monaco ... Dominic Gennaro
Robert Costanzo ... Alfonse Giardella
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Storyline

Janice's policeman father arrives for a visit and tells her about his pending indictment for corruption involving being an informant for Angelo Marino when a book that Marino had on him as a list of all of his informants... including hers. Sipowicz makes some appearances at the hotel where Giardella is staying to further intimidate him over the shooting death of Marino. Meanwhile, Kelly and Martinez are assigned a case involving the robbery and murder of a woman. Also, Josh Goldstein comes to the precinct in search for his gun he used to kill his assailant. Written by Anonymous

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Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 October 1993 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby (Dolby Surround)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

First appearance in the series of Gordon Clapp playing Greg Medavoy. See more »

Quotes

Lt. Arthur Fancy: I just got a call from the Federal Marshals' office. What the hell were you doing at Giardella's hotel?
Det. Andy Sipowicz: I was in the neighborhood.
Lt. Arthur Fancy: I don't get you, Sipowicz. You know you're on probation, and you still go over there and put on a Bozo act!
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User Reviews

 
Sipowicz versus Lt. Fancy, and a Case of the Week
16 September 2018 | by Better_TVSee all my reviews

The highlight of this episode is a confrontation between Dennis Franz and James McDaniel. The detective and sergeant go at it over Sipowicz's probationary desk duty, with the former trying to convince the latter that he's of more use on the streets catching bad guys than he is filing the stop and frisk reports. Sipowicz's rant is tinged with subtle racist overtones, as he rails against "black bosses" (he privately complains about "that African-American" to David Caruso earlier in the episode). It's an interesting scene, and both actors play it well.

Elsewhere, the "case of the week" is a robbery and homicide related to two drug-addicted adult children (Michael Rapaport, who barely has a single line, and the much more convincing Bradford Tatum) who recently moved back home with their God-fearing mother played by Tresa Hughes. It's not all that interesting, despite some good acting from Tatum and Hughes, and neither is the "C" plot involving Wendy Malick and Alan Scarfe as rich socialites who need police protection from David Caruso's Detective John Kelly.

Finally, Ralph Monaco is just barely present in the opening teaser as Amy Brenneman's cop father, who comes to the precinct to warn his daughter that he is going be indicted for being on mobster Angelo Marino's payroll. He's darn good in this small role, and I hope we see him again.

This is an average hour of television, but the good acting from Franz and other supporting players makes it worthwhile. I'd rather watch a classic show like this than almost any of the other paint-by-numbers police procedurals the Big Four broadcast networks spew out these days.


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