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"Cheers" One for the Road (TV Episode 1993) Poster

(TV Series)

(1993)

Trivia

In one of the last scenes shows Sam straightening a photograph on the side of the bar. The picture is of Geronimo. This is an homage to the late Nicholas Colasanto, who played "Coach" Ernie Pantusso from 1982-1985. The picture held special meaning to Colasanto who hung it in his dressing room. When he died in 1985, the picture was moved to the bar in his memory.
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Ted Danson (Sam "Mayday" Malone), Rhea Perlman (Carla Tortelli) and George Wendt (Hillary Norman "Norm" Peterson) are the only actors to appear in all 273 episodes of the series.
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This is the only time that Diane and Rebecca appeared together onscreen.
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The person who walks up and knocks on the door in the last scene is Bob Broder, agent for the show's creators Glen Charles & Les Charles and James Burrows.
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While the gang was smoking cigars and discussing the meaning of life, Frasier Crane's voice started trembling, as he sounded somewhat emotionally distraught while trying to finish his sentence. Given the fact that the series finale did not end with Sam Malone selling the bar, or anything bittersweet of that nature, Kelsey Grammer struggling with his words was not scripted, as he was genuinely sad while filming the very last scene with his co-stars of nine years. George Wendt adlibbed the comment regarding Cliff's perception of shoes, in an effort to ease Kelsey Grammer's heart a little.
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In the first scene of the first episode, Sam enters the main bar from the back room. In the last scene of the final episode, Sam exits the main bar and walks to the back room.
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The writers had a minor feud over whether to allow Diane and Sam to be together. Shoots took so long that Shelley Long had to go back to her other commitments, and the episode's closing scene in the bar was filmed without her. The scene was also done in secret without a studio audience, meaning a laugh track had to be added after the fact.
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According to Business Insider, this series finale is the 2nd most watched of all times (as of 2017) with 84.4 million viewers.
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The episode won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Editing for a Series - Multi-Camera Production.
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Warren Littlefield, who was the Executive Vice President of NBC Entertainment at the time and a champion of the show in its infancy, was seated at the other side of the bar in the opening scene. Furthermore, Grant Tinker, the then President of NBC, was sitting at the end of the bar on Warren's right side.
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The end credits of this final ever episode (part 3) show as white on a black background. The only time this happened. Every other episode in the whole run were gold/yellow on black background.
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Originally aired by NBC in a two hour block in which the episode itself was preceded with a Cheers retrospective/behind the scenes special. The original episode ran for a little over ninety minutes, and was edited to air in three parts for syndication.
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The job of writing the show's finale originally fell to showrunners Tom Anderson and Dan O'Shannon. However, both the network and series creators Glen Charles and Les Charles considered their finale script to be rushed and unsatisfactory. As a result, the network gave permission for the finale to be a triple-length special, while the Charles Brothers, with the blessing of Anderson and O'Shannon, took on the job of writing the finale themselves.
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