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Blade Runner 2049: a spoiler-filled exploration

Ryan Lambie Oct 6, 2017

So Blade Runner 2049, then. What's that all about? Spoilers ahoy, as we dig a little deeper...

Nb: This article contains spoilers for both Blade Runner and its sequel. Come back when you’ve seen both movies!

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If there’s going to be a controversial aspect of Blade Runner 2049, we suspect it’s that the belated sequel makes plain what was once playfully ambiguous. In the original cut of Ridley Scott’s original, which didn’t surface until a decade after Blade Runner’s initial release in 1982, the recurring image of a unicorn - first in a reverie, later as an origami sculpture - raised the possibility that Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) is a replicant.

There’s a
See full article at Den of Geek »

Looking back at Oliver Stone's JFK

Robert Keeling Apr 19, 2017

Kevin Costner headlined an all-star cast in Oliver Stone's JFK. It was a film that led to an act of Congress being passed...

Oliver Stone’s epic conspiracy-thriller JFK, surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy and the case brought about by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison in relation to his murder, was released in 1991 to an astonishing level of critical backlash. Even before JFK arrived in theatres it was being pilloried and attacked by many in the media. The attacks were kick-started by Washington Post correspondent George Lardner, an investigative reporter who wrote a piece called On the Set: Dallas In Wonderland; How Oliver Stone’s Version Of The Kennedy Assassination Exploits The Edge Of Paranoia, which was actually based solely on a leaked copy of Stone’s first draft of the script.

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See full article at Den of Geek »

Moscow KinoPoisk: Roger Christian readies 'Black Angel', Latido boards debut

  • ScreenDaily
Moscow KinoPoisk: Roger Christian readies 'Black Angel', Latido boards debut
Kfm: Russian investor boards ‘Black Angel’ remake, ‘made in Russia’ blockbusters, Kfm pitching winners, Latido picks up Ukrainian debut

Russian investment is set to be tapped for Roger Christian’s feature version of his 1980 cult short Black Angel.

Speaking during the first edition of the KinoPoisk Film Market (Kfm) in Moscow, the film’s producer Harald Reichebner said that 70% of the budget is in place as a co-production between the UK, Belgium and Hungary, with the final 30% now to come from an undisclosed private Russian investor.

The $9.7m production features an international cast including Dougray Scott, John Rhys-Davies, Rutger Hauer (who starred as The Mystic Monk in Christian’s 1994 biopic Nostradamus), Turkish-German actress-model Meryem Uzerli, star of the Turkish TV series Muhtesem Yüzyil, and Russian actor Vladimir Mashkov, known to international audiences from Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol and Behind Enemy Lines.

Berlin-based, Austrian-born Reichebner – who had previously worked with Christian as the producer on Nostradamus - told
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Watch: ‘Blade Runner’ Documentary Discusses Trials And Tribulations Of Making The Tech-Noir Classic

Watch: ‘Blade Runner’ Documentary Discusses Trials And Tribulations Of Making The Tech-Noir Classic
Since its release over thirty years ago, Ridley Scott‘s sci-fi noir classic “Blade Runner” has both captivated and confused audiences. Its dismal perspective on the future, the grimy yet enchanting streets of 2019 Los Angeles and even that weird unicorn sequence have solidified “Blade Runner” as one of the hallmarks of science fiction cinema.

But it wasn’t always that way, as revealed in a documentary on the making of the film.

Read More: ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ Making-Of Documentary: How the ‘Replacement Players’ Made an Enduring Classic

“On The Edge Of ‘Blade Runner,’” which originally premiered on Channel 4 in 2000, details the entire history of the film’s production and is hosted by film critic Mark Kermode. From its rocky beginnings, to its rocky production, to its, well, rocky post-production and release, “Blade Runner” was in a near-constant state of turmoil. Interviews with the cast and crew, archival
See full article at Indiewire »

Alien, Blade Runner & Prometheus: their artificial life

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Alien, Blade Runner and Prometheus all display an interest in AI. Here, we look at Ridley Scott's complex depiction of androids...

“All of those moments will be lost, like tears in rain... Time to die.”

One of the most poignant final lines of any sci-fi character? Almost certainly. That replicant Roy Batty evokes such sympathy in Blade Runner's dying moments is perhaps the greatest of all the conjuring tricks Ridley Scott managed to achieve in his 1982 classic. The film may be prized for its special effects and production design, but it's the arc of Batty's character - not to mention Rutger Hauer's peerless performance - that gives Blade Runner its emotional weight.

Released three years after the similarly influential Alien, Blade Runner was the last of Scott's science fiction films before his late-career return to the genre with 2012's Prometheus and this year's The Martian.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Should a sequel or prequel to Blade Runner really be made?

As news of a new Blade Runner movie arrives, Ryan wonders whether a worthy sequel or prequel could ever be made…

I'll start by stating the obvious: Blade Runner was a one-off, never-to-be-repeated classic. It was a movie where finances, creative talent and serendipity all came together to produce, not just one of the finest science fiction movies of all time, but one of the most startlingly inventive films ever to come out of Hollywood.

Blade Runner was made at a time when its director was at the height of his creative powers. Fresh from his box office success with Alien, Ridley Scott poured his energies into an adaptation of Philip K Dick's Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep, and he probably hasn't made a film as individual or beautiful to behold since.

The same could be said of Vangelis, whose woozy, eclectic score for Blade Runner is inarguably the
See full article at Den of Geek »

Fox is 'Breaking In' with Christian Slater; 'Lost's' Carlton Cuse explores the Civil War

Friday TV news bites to kick off your weekend:

Fox has picked up a comedy called "Breaking In" for midseason. The show stars Christian Slater and Bret Harrison and is set at a security firm; it could fill the slot intended for "Running Wilde," which is likely done after its initial 13-episode order. [Deadline]

Former "Lost" showrunner Carlton Cuse is working on a pilot for an "event series" (that's what miniseries are now called) about the Civil War. He and "Secretariat" director Randall Wallace are co-writing the pilot, which will be set in Virginia. [Variety]

The Food Netwwork has decided to part ways with "Ace of Cakes," which has aired more than 100 episodes since it debuted in 2006. The final season premieres in January. [TMZ]

"The Bachelor" sure does get around. Jake Pavelka, pilot and star of "The Bachelorette," "The Bachelor," "Dancing With the Stars" and "Drop Dead Diva" is continuing his dramatic turn
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

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