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Atom Egoyan Defends 'The Captive' and Addresses His Critics

Atom Egoyan Defends 'The Captive' and Addresses His Critics
[Editor's Note: This post is presented in partnership with Time Warner Cable Movies On Demand in support of Indie Film Month. Today's pick, "The Captive," is available now On Demand. This interview originally ran during the 2014 Cannes Film Festival.] Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan has been a fixture on La Croisette since his 1994 breakout feature "Exotica," which took the Fipresci prize. "The Sweet Hereafter" won that same award in addition to the Grand Prix honor in 1997. The filmmaker's career has by no means taken a nosedive since, but to many, he hasn't lived up to the promise set by his earlier efforts (save for "Felicia's Journey," which featured a great performance by the late Bob Hoskins). "Where the Truth Lies," "Adoration" and "Chloe" were all met with mixed reviews, while his latest to open in theaters, the West Memphis Three drama "Devil's Knot," was his worst...
See full article at Indiewire »

Atom Egoyan on 'The Captive,' Boos at Cannes, and Exploitation

  • Moviefone
In May, Canadian director Atom Egoyan's latest film "The Captive" bowed as part of the prestigious Official Selection at the Cannes Film Festival. Charitably it can be said reception of the film was mixed, with some stinging vitriol levelled at Egoyan.

"The Captive" is a challenging, dark film that echoes many themes prominent in Egoyan's other works. The loss of a child, the bleak snowy landscapes and emotionally charged performances from the likes of Rosario Dawson and Ryan Reynolds make for a unique kind of thriller that may well find more receptive audiences outside of the festival bubble.

Moviefone Canada spoke to Atom Egoyan in Toronto at the end of August, as he was preparing to host a sneak preview of his film to a local audience.

Moviefone Canada: You've lived with the film a little bit [since Cannes]. How's your reaction to your baby changed now that you have a bit of distance?
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Cannes: Atom Egoyan Defends 'The Captive' and Addresses His Many Critics: 'I have a really thick skin'

Cannes: Atom Egoyan Defends 'The Captive' and Addresses His Many Critics: 'I have a really thick skin'
Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan has been a fixture on La Croisette since his 1994 breakout feature "Exotica," which took the Fipresci prize. "The Sweet Hereafter" won that same award in addition to the Grand Prix honor in 1997. The filmmaker's career has by no means taken a nosedive since, but to many, he hasn't lived up to the promise set by his earlier efforts (save for "Felicia's Journey," which featured a great performance by the late Bob Hoskins). "Where the Truth Lies," "Adoration" and "Chloe" were all met with mixed reviews, while his latest to open in theaters, the West Memphis Three drama "Devil's Knot," was his worst reviewed effort to date. His last two films ("Chloe" and "Devil's Knot") weren't given a Cannes berth, so early signs pointed to "The Captive" being a likely comeback for Egoyan. Unfortunately, according to the majority of critics in the room for today's world premiere at Cannes,
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: First Clip From Atom Egoyan's Cannes Thriller 'The Captive' Starring Ryan Reynolds Plus New Pics & Poster

Can Atom Egoyan get his groove back? It has been a while since the director showcased the skill he brought to films like "The Sweet Hereafter" or "Felicia's Journey," and last weekend's "Devil's Knot" was another in a string of recent pictures that were tepidly received by both critics and the public. But "The Captive" finds him in Competition at the Cannes Film Festival and the first clip is here highlighting the drama to come. Starring Ryan Reynolds, Scott Speedman, Mireille Enos, Rosario Dawson, Kevin Durand, Alexia Fast and Bruce Greenwood, the film tells the story of Matthew, a father who is convinced eight years after his daughter’s abduction, thanks to a series of new clues, that she's still alive. And in this first clip from the movie, we see the father and daughter in happier times, picking up dinner, though with weather providing an ominous backdrop against which
See full article at The Playlist »

Cannes Check 2014: Ryan Reynolds in Atom Egoyan's 'The Captive'

  • Hitfix
Cannes Check 2014: Ryan Reynolds in Atom Egoyan's 'The Captive'
Welcome back to Cannes Check, In Contention's annual preview of the films in Competition at next month's Cannes Film Festival, which kicks off on May 14. Taking on different selections every day, we'll be examining what they're about, who's involved and what their chances are of snagging an award from Jane Campion's jury. Next up, the third Canadian director in the lineup: Atom Egoyan's "The Captive." The director: Atom Egoyan (Canadian, 53 years old). There was a time when Egoyan looked to be as estimable a festival fixture as his compatriot David Cronenberg, but his career hasn't moved in the direction many thought it would after he won big at Cannes (and scooped a surprise Best Director Oscar nod) for 1997's critical peak “The Sweet Hereafter.” Born in Cairo to Armenian-Egyptian parents – a heritage he'd later explore in his 2002 film “Ararat” – Egoyan largely grew up in British Columbia and studied
See full article at Hitfix »

Bob Hoskins: we should remember him for his TV work too

From the adult literacy series On the Move, through to classy literary adaptations, via the odd dodgy geezer or two, the late actor's small-screen career shares the qualities of his best film work

Bob Hoskins: five-foot-six cubic and bursting with brilliance

Bob Hoskins: forget Mona Lisa, Felicia's Journey was his masterpiece

Helen Mirren pays tribute to a 'great actor and greater man'

Bob Hoskins was a godsend for those TV shows that would feature footage of the work now-famous performers took early on to pay the bills. Shows such as Before They Were Famous. Because before he was on the big screen in films such as Mona Lisa, Who Framed Roger Rabbit? and The Cotton Club, Hoskins had played a removals man who sought help for his illiteracy in On the Move, a Sunday afternoon series of 10-minute dramas (screened in 1975 as part of the BBC's adult education
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bob Hoskins: 'A beautiful, kind man who wanted most to be with his family'

Elaine Cassidy, Hoskins' co-star in Felicia's Journey, has paid tribute to the late actor, while Hoskins' daughter posts online 11 life lessons from her father

 Peter Bradshaw: Felicia's Journey was Hoskins' finest hour

Bob Hoskins' co-star on one of the late actor's most celebrated films has paid tribute to the British cinema icon as a "brilliant, beautiful kind man who wanted more than anything to be with his family".

Irish actor Elaine Cassidy, who worked with Hoskins on Felicia's Journey, said she was "shocked, speechless and of course saddened" to hear of the actor's death from pneumonia at the age of 71.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Christopher Plummer, Martin Landau, Bruno Ganz & Dean Norris To Star In Atom Egoyan's 'Remember'

Director Atom Egoyan has a number of acclaimed films under his belt — "The Sweet Hereafter," "Felicia's Journey," "Exotica" — but it should also be noted, that when he stumbles, he misses hard. His last two films in particular didn't hit the mark, with the campy sexytimes "Chloe" and the West Memphis Three drama "Devil's Knot" finding the director off his game. And while we wait to see how his Cannes entry "The Captive" turns out, he's already lining up his next pic. Veterans Christopher Plummer, Martin Landau and Bruno Ganz along with "Breaking Bad" fave Dean Norris have been slated to star in "Remember." The film is said to be a thriller "in which the darkest chapter of modern history collides with a contemporary mission of revenge." Okay, then....any guesses? It's hard not to like this cast, and the logline has us intrigued, but let's just hope this finds Egoyan
See full article at The Playlist »

Bob Hoskins obituary

Actor associated with tough guy roles, but capable of playing the poodle as well as the pitbull

Bob Hoskins: Xan Brooks pays tribute

Bob Hoskins: a career in pictures

Plenty of better-looking performers than Bob Hoskins, who has died aged 71, have found themselves consigned to a life of bit parts. Short, bullet-headed, lacking any noticeable neck, but with a mutable face that could switch from snarling to sparkling in the time it took him to drop an aitch, Hoskins was far from conventional leading-man material. In his moments of on-screen rage, he resembled a pink grenade. But he was defined from the outset by a mix of the tough and the tender that served him well throughout his career.

As the beleaguered, optimistic sheet-music salesman in the BBC series Pennies from Heaven (1978), written by Dennis Potter, he was sweetly galumphing and sincere. Playing an ambitious East End gangster
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bob Hoskins obituary

Actor associated with tough guy roles, but capable of playing the poodle as well as the pitbull

Bob Hoskins: Xan Brooks pays tribute

Bob Hoskins: a career in pictures

Bob Hoskins: Michael Coveney on his stage work

Plenty of better-looking performers than Bob Hoskins, who has died aged 71 of pneumonia, have found themselves consigned to a life of bit parts. Short, bullet-headed, lacking any noticeable neck, but with a mutable face that could switch from snarling to sparkling in the time it took him to drop an aitch, Hoskins was far from conventional leading-man material. In his moments of on-screen rage, he resembled a pink grenade. But he was defined from the outset by a mix of the tough and the tender that served him well throughout his career.

As the beleaguered, optimistic sheet-music salesman in the BBC series Pennies from Heaven (1978), written by Dennis Potter, he was sweetly galumphing and sincere.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Oscar-nominated British actor Bob Hoskins passes away at 71

  • Hitfix
Oscar-nominated British actor Bob Hoskins passes away at 71
I'm hugely saddened to report that Oscar-nominated British actor Bob Hoskins -- the quintessential Cockney gent of latter-day cinema -- has passed away. Aged 71, he died in hospital following a bout of pneumonia. His wife, Linda, and four children issued a statement clarifying that the Londoner "died peacefully at hospital last night surrounded by family," and thanked well-wishers for their "messages of love and support." Hoskins' health had been declining for some time: he retired  from acting in 2012 after being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. His last screen role was in "Snow White and the Huntsman." After supporting roles in such films as "Zulu Dawn" and a BAFTA-nominated turn in Dennis Potter's TV landmark "Pennies From Heaven," Hoskins' film breakthrough came in his late thirties with the role of conflicted East End crime boss Harold Shand in the 1980 gangster classic "The Long Good Friday," which earned him another BAFTA nod.
See full article at Hitfix »

Bob Hoskins dies

Bob Hoskins in The Long Good Friday

The much loved actor Bob Hoskins has died at the age of 71, according to his agent. Hoskins, though sometimes typecast as a cheeky Cockney chappie, was an actor whose talent shone through in the great diversity of roles he played, from Who Framed Roger Rabbit's hapless detective to the taxi driver out of his depth in Mona Lisa and the sinister, obsessive catering manager in Felicia's Journey. Despite failing health, he recently appeared in Snow White And The Huntsman.

The actor's career path was an unusual one. Coming from a working class background and leaving school with only one O-level, he worked as a window cleaner and got into theatre by accident after being mistaken for a professional actor. He was immediately acclaimed for his remarkable natural talent.

Hoskins also did some notable work on television, appearing in an acclaimed production of
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

On my radar: Peter McDonald's cultural highlights

The Irish actor and writer on Vic and Bob, Philomena and London's parks

Peter McDonald is an Irish actor and writer best known for Moone Boy, Sea of Souls and Rte's Your Bad Self. Born in Dublin in 1972, he began his acting as a student at University College Dublin. In addition to his TV roles, he has appeared in more than a dozen fims, including I Went Down, The Damned United and Felicia's Journey, while his theatre work includes a highly praised production of Glengarry Glen Ross at the Apollo in London. As well as Sky 1's Moone Boy, McDonald can currently be seen in the comedy film The Stag and at Wyndham's theatre in The Weir.

Television: House of Fools

Absolutely crazy and a real breath of fresh air. Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer are at their best and have great support from Matt Berry and Morgana Robinson. It
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bob Hoskins bows out

The much loved actor Bob Hoskins is to retire after a 40 year career, it was announced today. The decision follows his diagnosis with Parkinson's disease last Autumn.

"He wishes to thank all the great and brilliant people he has worked with over the years, and all of his fans who have supported him during a wonderful career," said a statement released by his agent today. "Bob is now looking forward to his retirement with his family."

Hoskins, 69, is a Golden Globe winner who has won widespread acclaim for his work. As well as starring in family comedies like Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, he is known for thrillers like Mona Lisa and The Long Good Friday and challenging indie projects like Felicia's Journey. He recently appeared in Snow White And The Huntsman....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Atom Egoyan Talks Chloe and the Soul of Cinema

A chance to speak face to face, and at length, with Atom Egoyan, was both intoxicating and liberating offering the chance for rich dialogue but passing by all too quickly. Seldom have I spoken to filmmaker who seemed this invested in the hearts and minds of his characters and audience. And seldom have a felt more frustrated not to have more time. This in spite of a full half an hour with the man. Gregarious, thoughtful and genuinely interested in his work he also manages to evoke that passion with a peace that speaks directly to the heart of his work. 

Dave: You know, when I first started writing about film I was accidently sent a copy of Felicia's Journey by Lionsgate and I fell completely in love with it. It was one of the big reasons I pursued this interview so aggressively. The film had a point of view
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Do You Enjoy 'Camera-Aware' Performances?

Do You Enjoy 'Camera-Aware' Performances?
Atom Egoyan's erotic thriller, Chloe, starring Julianne Moore, Liam Neeson and Amanda Seyfried will be getting a limited North America theatrical release on March 26. Chloe is a young escort hired by Catherine (Moore) to seduce her husband (Neeson) and uncover the reasons behind his physical and emotional absence. When Chloe is successful and shares the stories with Catherine, she becomes obsessed with the accounts and tangled in a web of sexual desire that places everything, including her family, at risk. While the most memorable thing about the recent trailers is probably a kissing scene between Moore and Seyfried, the clip's end features a tense moment in which Seyfried catches her breath and, with tears in her eyes, lifts her gaze and stares directly into the camera. This is something the Armenian-Canadian director has done before in other films, and is certainly not something new to cinema.

For someone like Egoyan,
See full article at Cinematical »

Adoration | Film review

In the late 90s, Atom Egoyan seemed to be entering the mainstream with the striking The Sweet Hereafter and the creepy Felicia's Journey. But this movie, set in Toronto and starring his wife and muse, Arsinée Khanjian, as a batty schoolteacher, is a ludicrously convoluted tale that deals with the Holocaust, terrorism and several of his recurrent obsessions (appearance and reality, the influence of new technologies and so on) but gets nowhere.

DramaPhilip French

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The double life of Atom Egoyan

One minute he's making uneasy arthouse films, the next he's a Hollywood gun for hire, shooting the likes of Liam Neeson. Can auteur Atom Egoyan really cope with a dip in the mainstream?

A year is a long time in the movies. Fifteen months ago, I met the Canadian film-maker Atom Egoyan as he brought his low-key indie Adoration to the London film festival. The venue was an anonymous hotel cafe. At the festival's next edition, Egoyan returns with a new film, Chloe; this one stars Julianne Moore, Liam Neeson and Amanda Seyfried, and Egoyan is holding forth in a suite at Claridge's in central London. Things have clearly gone well for him.

At our first enconter, in the cafe, Egoyan was nursing a hangover that made him pleasantly effusive. He wasn't what I expected. Even his actors can be confused; before starting work on Adoration, one of its leads,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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