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Card Sharks (TV Series 1978–1989) Poster

(1978–1989)

Trivia

This show uses the same theme song as Double Dare (1976). Both shows featured Gene Wood as announcer and were both produced by Jonathan M. Goodson.
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The maximum amount that could be won on this show was $28,800. Only one contestant was able to pull this off during the Money Cards round.
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Only one contestant won the maximum $28,800 allowed, Norma Brown in late-1978. No other contestant was able to duplicate her success.
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During the Money Cards, a "double" (or having the next card be the same value as the previous one) used to lose the contestant money. Enough contestants cried foul, and eventually it became a push in 1981.
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Though Gene Wood was the announcer for this series, both pilots were announced by Johnny Olson.
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Host Jim Perry thought the question podium looked like R2D2 from Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977) and he began referring to it as G2T2.
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On the series finale, Jim Perry gave a farewell speech and invited the entire crew on stage so the TV audience could see all of the hardworking people who make the show possible.
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Once during the run on the CBS version; in the Big Money Cards, a contestant wagered all of her money, by calling out higher than a Queen, and won.
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Next to The Price Is Right (1972), this was the second successful Goodson show ever to not feature a Tournament of Champions.
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In the show's run, nobody had won $32,000, on the CBS version. Only 2 contestants almost won that amount.
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Before Suzanna Williams was one of the dealers on the CBS version, she was a contestant on Super Password (1984).
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When it premiered on the CBS version, contestants had won $90,000 in 1 week on the Money Cards. The producers realized that the original change card rules produced too many big wins. To control the prize budget, the rules reinstated to changing 1 card, per line.
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On one of the tapings, a contestant had 3 jokers, and lost the car.
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At least one educated guess question did have an answer of zero. It happened only once, throughout its run.
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99 was the answer to a 100 people survey question. It happened only once, throughout its run.
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Two $500 bonuses were added to the main game by 1981. One for if a contestant hits the actual number in a question right on, and one for if a contestant can run his line of cards to the end without freezing or guessing wrong.
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The intro actually featured clips from the pilot. If you pay close attention to the wide shot of the set, you may notice a slightly different layout and design for the "Money Cards" bonus round board.
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The show also uses the same opening sequence with four corners with flashing graphics. Both shows were produced by Jonathan M. Goodson.
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Only one card per line could be changed during the Money Cards round.
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From it's debut until June 20th 1980, the show aired at 10:00 am on NBC. After a schedule shuffle at NBC to accommodate The David Letterman Show (1980), Card Sharks was moved to noon where it faced fierce competition against top-rated game show Family Feud (1976) on ABC and the first half of The Young and the Restless (1973) in certain markets on CBS.
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In the event any contestant has not cleared their row of cards, a fourth question was Sudden Death, the last question in the round, that determined who got control the cards before they won or lost.
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In early episodes of the Money Cards of the CBS version, when a contestants loses his/her money, the scoreboard resulted in $0, then later, it reinstated itself back to "Bust."
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Bob Eubanks appeared on the show to promote his show All Star Secrets (1979).
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When it returned, in the Money Cards bonus round, the graphic behind the playing card featured a circle, which later changed into a diamond.
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The tiebreaker game to determine a winner to play the Money Cards round had three cards dealt instead of five, with a maximum of three questions.
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Originally, the two card dealer models were Janice Baker and Ann Pennington. Pennington eventually left the show and was replaced by Lois Areno.
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The bell when a contestant gets the answer exactly right was the school bell taken from Child's Play (1982) and Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour (1983).
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The CBS version was canceled within a week right after Sale of the Century (1983) and Super Password (1984) went off the air. It was replaced a week later with the short-lived game show Now You See It (1989).
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When hosting the show for the NBC version, Jim Perry used a wired microphone with a marble top.
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On the original Jim Perry version, each time a player freezes their own position, the player's freeze bar electronically moved by itself. On the Bob Eubanks/Bill Rafferty reboot, the freeze bar was moved manually by the models.
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The losing horn was taken from The Price Is Right (1972) and Double Dare (1976). On the NBC run, they used the abbreviated version, and on the CBS run, they used the version in augmentation.
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All of their survey questions were similar to the surveys done on Family Feud (1976).
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On this version of Card Sharks, Jim Perry would ask as many as ten, maybe eleven questions per show.
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The show was based on 'Acey Deucy.'
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Until it's move to the noon death timeslot, Card Sharks remained one of the most consistent performers on the struggling NBC network during Fred Silverman's tenure as network president.
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Reuns were first aired on CBN in 1984 and along with Blockbusters (1980) was the first Goodson-Todman game show to be rerun on cable TV. This predated the launch of GSN by 10 years.
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This show and Family Feud (1976) were both survey based shows created by Chester Feldman, the executive producer of this show.
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On the CBS version, when a contestant won a car, the word "CAR" circling around the winner appears to be a rainbow color scheme, would also be shown around the contestant (similar to the graphic of chasing rainbow cars on Classic Concentration (1987)). Though for the first few weeks, it didn't appear, until November 1986. The most coincidental thing is both game shows were produced by Mark Goodson, they both aired, at the same time, but on different networks.
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Just like the NBC version, whenever there was a tiebreaker, the CBS version would also have 3 cards, along with 3 questions. This changed on February 29, 1988 until the series' ending, the tiebreaker is changed to only a 1 question sudden death game; where both base cards are shown before the winner of the question decides whether they needed to play or pass.
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When the second version (CBS) was in development, former host Jim Perry was Mark Goodson's first choice, a second time, when he was already under contract with NBC, who was also hosting Sale of the Century (1983) at the time, therefore, the job was given to Bob Eubanks, who previously hosted the short-lived Goodson game show Trivia Trap (1984), who was also hosting The New Newlywed Game (1984) at the time.
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It premiered on January 6, 1986, on CBS at 10:30 A.M. EST/9:30 PST, replacing Body Language (1984), whose network also relocated Press Your Luck (1983), in the time slot of 4:00 P.M. EST/3:00 P.M. PST.
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On the CBS version, like The Price Is Right (1972), earlier in the run, before a commercial break, director Marc Breslow would do a freeze frame of the winning contestant, who played The Big Money Cards.
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On the premiere episode of the CBS version, a contestant had won $5,200 in the Money Cards, and stayed on for 3 days, for a total of $13,200.
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During Young People's Week, throughout its run, surveys are modified to more family/friendly questions.
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After Card Sharks was developed for the CBS version, Bob Eubanks promoted his show on The Price Is Right (1972), in late 1985, where he jokingly bid $400, when the prize wasn't brought out.
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During the CBS series, over 6,000 questions were asked, including roughly over 1,500 audience polling questions, roughly over 600 educated guess questions, and over 4,000 questions asked of 100 individuals. Some of the questions were recycled in later episodes, but educated guess questions were very rarely recycled.
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During the run of the CBS version, only five known episodes had no car game and no Money Cards played during a full episode due to a lengthy match that took up the whole show
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When the show returned to CBS, and after the Money Cards, contestants did not play for a car. On October 27, 1986, for the CBS version, a winning contestant received one Joker for winning the match. Three more were added to the Money Cards deck, and if a contestant uncovered them they received an additional chance to win the car. After the Money Cards round was over, a row of seven numbered cards was wheeled out, in front of them and the contestant placed whatever Jokers they'd earned over the cards in the hopes that behind one of them was the word "CAR". During the special weeks when children played, the top prize was a trip to Hawaii (with either "WIN" or "HAWAII" displayed on one of the cards) and the children were given two Jokers to start. From July 4, 1988 until the show's ending, the winning contestant had to correctly predict one final audience poll question. To record their guess, the contestant used a special prop with a dial and the numbers 0 through 10 on it. The contestant moved the dial to the number they thought was correct, and if it was they won the car. Missing by one in either direction won the contestant $500 as a consolation prize, while any other incorrect guess won nothing. On the final episode, however, if the contestant was even one off, they still won the car. This version of the car game was based on the "Judge the Jury" round on the short-lived Goodson game show, Mindreaders (1979).
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Along with The $25,000 Pyramid (1974), Press Your Luck (1983) and of course The Price Is Right (1972), it is considered to be the greatest game show on CBS.
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When hosting the CBS version, Bob Eubanks used a microphone widescreen.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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