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Finally another Oscar nomination? Which 10 actors and actresses have waited at least 10 agonizing years?

Finally another Oscar nomination? Which 10 actors and actresses have waited at least 10 agonizing years?
As we close out another decade, it’s going to be a really special year for a few actors and actresses during awards season. During those 10 years, at least 10 performers have waited at least that long just to get back in at the 2020 Oscars (at least in acting categories). Which ones are included in our photo gallery above? Our list only includes the people that currently have better than 100-1 odds in our Academy Awards predictions center.

Almost all of those included below have also been previous Oscar winners, including Tom Hanks, Charlize Theron and Renee Zellweger.

SEETop 20 Greatest Living Actors Never Nominated for an Oscar

Alan Alda (“Marriage Story”)

He currently has 78/1 odds for Best Supporting Actor. Alda has waited 15 years since his one and only nomination for “The Aviator.”

Tom Hanks (“A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood”)

He currently has 5/1 odds for Best Supporting Actor. Hanks has waited
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tweetweek: 1917, Movie Real Estate, and 'The Bad Place'

by Nathaniel R

So we were at the first screening of 1917 yesterday at the DGA theater in NYC and as you may have noticed if you were online, the Oscar pundits and online film press collectively went berzerk for it, immediately declaring it was going to win everything, it was best this and that... even of the decade! 'Nobody's ever done this before' (uhhhhh. people have been doing continuous take movies since at least Hitchcock's Rope in the 1940s and probably before that and one of 'em just won Best Picture five years ago!) For the record we enjoyed it and it is quite technically impressive... but deep breaths people. "Consider" your opinions before tweeting them out before the credits of the thing you just watched have even stopped rolling!

Much is made in 1917 about the futility of medals and yet my dumb ass still wants one for noticing each
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Joker’ composer Hildur Guonadottir would defy Oscar history by dancing away with nomination

‘Joker’ composer Hildur Guonadottir would defy Oscar history by dancing away with nomination
Joaquin Phoenix has swallowed up most of the attention for “Joker,” but another aspect of the Warner Bros. film has managed to impress moviegoers: the original score. Composer Hildur Guonadottir was honored with the Best Soundtrack award at the Venice Film Festival for her work on “Joker,” and now she is in the hunt to score her first Oscar nomination.

Should “Joker” earn that original score bid, it would be only the seventh comic book film to do so in Oscar history, following “The Mask of Zorro” (1940), “Superman” (1978), “Dick Tracy” (1990), “Men in Black” (1997), “The Adventures of Tintin” (2011) and last year’s winner “Black Panther.” It would be the first nomination in this category for a film based on characters in the Batman universe, with even “The Dark Knight” failing to score a bid in 2008. This would suggest a bias against such films, so “Joker” would seemingly be at a disadvantage.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Iconic Character Actor Michael J. Pollard Dies at 80

Tony Sokol Nov 22, 2019

Michael J. Pollard was in the classic film Bonnie and Clyde, the classic series Star Trek and named a classic album.

Michael J. Pollard, a legendary character actor who was featured in Bonnie and Clyde, the original Star Trek, and House of 1000 Corpses, died in Los Angeles from cardiac arrest on Nov. 21, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 80.

Pollard's breakout role was as C.W. Moss, the gas station attendant who drove getaway cars in the 1967 gangster classic Bonnie and Clyde, starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. The role got Pollard nominated for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar. In a career spanning seven decades, Pollard created many memorable characters. He led the gang of orphan children in the 1966 Star Trek episode "Miri," which also featured Kim Darby. That same year he played character inspired by Peter Pan in in the Lost in Space episode "The Magic Mirror.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Michael J. Pollard, Oscar Nominee For "Bonnie And Clyde", Dead At 80

  • CinemaRetro
Trade magazine ad promoting Pollard's nomination for Best Supporting Actor Oscar in "Bonnie and Clyde".

By Lee Pfeiffer

Actor Michael J. Pollard has passed away from cardiac arrest at age 80. Pollard's unique look and acting style propelled him to fame in the 1960s. Pollard was born in New Jersey and crossed the river to study in the famed Actors Studio. He first appeared on Broadway in the smash hit production of "Bye Bye Birdie" and quickly became a familiar face on popular television programs including  "Gunsmoke", "Lost in Space", "The Andy Griffith Show", "Star Trek", "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis", "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", "Route 66", "I Spy", "The Fall Guy", "The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.", "Crime Story", "Superboy" and "Tales from the Crypt". Pollard's trademark onscreen persona was as a lovable but dim-witted, slow moving character. The image paid off handsomely for him when was cast as C.W. Moss
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Michael J. Pollard Dies: Oscar-Nominated ‘Bonnie And Clyde’ Actor Was 80

  • Deadline
Michael J. Pollard Dies: Oscar-Nominated ‘Bonnie And Clyde’ Actor Was 80
Michael J. Pollard, whose long list of acting credits stretches back to the late 1950s but likely will is best remembered for his Oscar-nominated, star-making turn as the dimwitted but lovable sidekick C.W. Moss in 1967’s Bonnie and Clyde, has died. He was 80.

His death was announced on Facebook today by filmmaker Rob Zombie, who directed Pollard in 2003’s House of 1000 Corpses. A New York Times obituary cites Pollard’s friend Dawn Walker, who says the actor died Thursday of cardiac arrest at a Los Angeles hospital.

“Another member of our House of 1000 Corpses family has left us,” Zombie wrote. “The great Michael J Pollard has died. I have been a huge fan of Michael since I first saw him on the Star Trek “Miri”. He was amazing in everything from Bonnie and Clyde to Little Fauss and Big Halsy from Dirty Little Billy to The Four of the Apocalypse.
See full article at Deadline »

Danny Elfman Attuned To ‘Chaotic Thinkers’ As New MasterClass Maestro

  • Deadline
Danny Elfman Attuned To ‘Chaotic Thinkers’ As New MasterClass Maestro
Exclusive: The looming new year brings with it a double anniversary in the singular career of the great Danny Elfman. It will mark the 40th anniversary of the composer’s first film soundtrack as well as the 40th anniversary of Oingo Boingo, the new wave band with a brassy boneyard sound and loads of lyrical mischief in alt-rock standards like Dead Man’s Party, Only A Lad, Little Girls and Weird Science.

Elfman remains a movie maestro in high demand and the Los Angeles native has no plans to pass off the baton anytime soon. Still, Elfman has found himself contemplating his legacy more in recent seasons and the thought process has led the erstwhile rock star to a new and unexpected place: the classroom.

With “Making Music Out of Chaos,” Elfman’s just-released addition to the highly regarded MasterClass series, the 66-year-old
See full article at Deadline »

Prolific Title Designer Wayne Fitzgerald Dies at 89

  • Variety
Prolific Title Designer Wayne Fitzgerald Dies at 89
Wayne Fitzgerald, the main title designer of films and television shows including “Apocalypse Now,” “The Graduate,” “Chinatown,” “Dallas,” “The Searchers,” “The Godfather” and “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” died Monday in Whidbey Island, Wash. He was 89.

Fitzgerald began his title design career with Pacific Art & Title Studio after graduating from Pasadena’s Art Center College of Design in 1951, where he eventually became head of art and design department. During his 17 years with the studio Fitzgerald designed the titles for classic films such as “Touch of Evil,” “My Fair Lady,” “Pillow Talk,” “Imitation of Life” and “Music Man.”

In 1967, Fitzgerald left the company to found his own studio Wayne Fitzgerald FilmDesign. With his new studio he worked on films such as “Footloose,” “Total Recall,” “The Deer Hunter,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “Catch-22,” “Dick Tracy,” “Scent of a Woman” and many more.

Fitzgerald racked up 455 title design credits over his nearly half century long career.
See full article at Variety »

Wayne Fitzgerald, Prolific Hollywood Title Designer, Dies at 89

  • The Wrap
Wayne Fitzgerald, Prolific Hollywood Title Designer, Dies at 89
William Fitzgerald, the prolific title designer who worked on such films as “The Godfather: Part II,” “The Godfather: Part II,” “Total Recall” and “Dick Tracy” has died, according to reports. He was 89.

After graduating from Pasadena’s Art Center College of Design in 1951, Fitzgerald was hired by Pacific Art & Title Studio. The Studio was responsible for creating all of the title work for the major studios at the time: 20th Century Fox, MGM and Warner Bros. The artists’ work went uncredited, but during his 17-year-tenure, Fitzgerald designed the titles for such films as “Music Man,” “My Fair Lady” and “Pillow Talk,” and television shows including “The Beverly Hillbillies” and “Mr. Ed.”

Fitzgerald left Pacific Art & Title in 1968 to found his own studio, Wayne Fitzgerald FilmDesign. There, he worked on some of cinema’s greatest films, including both “Godfather” sequels, “The Deer Hunter,” “Chinatown,” “Tootsie,” “Footloose,” “Total Recall,” “Dick Tracy” and “Scent of a Woman.
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscar predictions: Top 10 frontrunners for Best Supporting Actor include Brad Pitt, Tom Hanks and …

  • Gold Derby
Oscar predictions: Top 10 frontrunners for Best Supporting Actor include Brad Pitt, Tom Hanks and …
Frontrunners are already forming in the Oscar race for Best Supporting Actor, according to early predictions at Gold Derby. While most films in contention have not yet been released, many were recently seen by film critics and industry insiders at the Toronto, Telluride and Venice Film Festivals. We’ve confirmed most category placements with studios or campaigners, but some decisions aren’t yet final. Meantime, Gold Derby lists Brad Pitt (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”) as well as Christian Bale and Matt Damon (“Ford v. Ferrari”) in both lead and supporting categories in our prediction center.

Here are the current top 10 supporting actor picks according to racetrack odds based upon our users’ predictions as of Sept. 17:

1. Brad Pitt (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”): Pitt doesn’t have a designated category yet, so he appears both as a lead and supporting candidate on the Gold Derby site.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Top 10 early-bird Best Supporting Actor Oscar predictions: Brad Pitt (‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’) is No. 1 for now

Top 10 early-bird Best Supporting Actor Oscar predictions: Brad Pitt (‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’) is No. 1 for now
Frontrunners are already forming for the Oscar Best Supporting Actor race, according to early predictions at Gold Derby. While most films in contention have not yet been released, enough teaser trailers are out there, ranging from “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” and “The Irishman” to “Joker” and “Ford v Ferrari” to provide some sense of what at least feels like a worthy contender. We’ve confirmed category placements with studios or campaigners, but — as awards season veterans know — such labels can change later. And once the fall film fests commence, the standings will likely rapidly shift.

Here are the current top 10 supporting actor picks on the Gold Derby site, in order, as of Aug. 13:

1. Brad Pitt (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”): Pitt doesn’t have a designated category yet, so he appears both as a lead and supporting candidate on the Gold Derby site. But fans
See full article at Gold Derby »

"Cuphead" On Netflix

Netflix Animation and King Features, will co-produce an adaptation of StudioMDHR's 1930's cartoon-inspired video game "Cuphead", created by Chad and Jared Moldenhauer, as the first, long-form animated series for King Features, the home of "Popeye" and "Dick Tracy", as the company builds up franchises across TV, digital video, licensing and social media:

"...on 'Inkwell Isles', 'Cuphead' and his brother 'Mugman' are two fun-loving cups who live under the watchful eye of 'Elder Kettle'. Against the elder's warnings, the brothers enter the 'Devil's Casino' and begin playing craps. 

"When they go on a winning streak, the Devil himself offers to raise the stakes. If Cuphead and Mugman can win one more roll, they will receive all the money in the casino; if not, the Devil will take their souls.

"Cuphead loses by rolling snake eyes, and he and Mugman beg for mercy. The Devil makes a deal with them: collect the
See full article at SneakPeek »

Seymour Cassel, Wes Anderson and John Cassavetes Actor, Dead at 84

Seymour Cassel, Wes Anderson and John Cassavetes Actor, Dead at 84
Seymour Cassel, the veteran character actor known for his work with directors John Cassavetes and Wes Anderson, has died at the age of 84.

Cassel died Sunday in Los Angeles, Variety reported, adding that the actor suffered from Alzheimer’s disease in recent years.

A longtime character actor with over 200 credits on his resume, Cassel first appeared onscreen in Cassavetes’ 1958 directorial debut Shadows, with Cassel serving as both actor and crewmember on the independent production.

The film was the first in a nearly 30-year-long collaboration and friendship between Cassavetes and Cassel,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Seymour Cassel Dies: Oscar-Nominated Actor In John Cassavetes & Wes Anderson Pics Was 84

  • Deadline
Seymour Cassel Dies: Oscar-Nominated Actor In John Cassavetes & Wes Anderson Pics Was 84
Seymour Cassel, an Oscar-nominated longtime actor whose 200-plus screen credits include several John Cassavetes movies and three for Wes Anderson, died Sunday of Alzheimer’s complications in Los Angeles. He was 84.

Cassel scored a Supporting Actor Oscar nom for Cassavetes’ 1968 film Faces, a role that also earned him a trophy from the National Society of Film Critics. He appeared in about a half-dozen of Cassavetes’ films and also acted opposite him in a few others. Anderson cast Cassel in his films The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004), The Royal Tenenbaums (2001) and Rushmore (1998).

Cassel also was active in pre-merger SAG politics, running for national president in 2007 and 2009.

Born on January 22, 1935, in Detroit, Cassel’s film debut was an uncredited role in Cassavetes’ Shadows (1958). We would co-star alongside the filmmaker-actor in the early-’60s movies The Webster Boy, Too Late Blues — which Cassavetes also helmed — and The Killers, which was Ronald Reagan’s last movie.
See full article at Deadline »

Seymour Cassel, ‘Rushmore’ and ‘Minnie and Moskowitz’ Actor, Dead at 84

Seymour Cassel, ‘Rushmore’ and ‘Minnie and Moskowitz’ Actor, Dead at 84
Seymour Cassel, a revered actor beloved by cinephiles for his frequent collaborations with John Cassavetes and Wes Anderson, has died. The actor was 84. An Oscar nominee for his performance in “Faces,” his third of seven films with Cassavetes, Cassel worked with Anderson on “Rushmore,” “The Royal Tenenbaums,” and “The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.”

The thespian had more than 200 acting credits to his name throughout his nearly 60-year career, which began with a role in Cassavetes’ “Shadows.” He wasn’t confined to independent productions, however, with roles in films like “Dick Tracy,” “Indecent Proposal,” and “Tin Men” balancing his more arthouse-inclined fare. Even so, he made it clear in a 1997 discussion with IndieWire where his allegiance was: “Independent film is film that has thought in it. There’s no independent thought in studio films. It’s collective thought,” he said.

“With independent film, simply because they don’t have the
See full article at Indiewire »

With ‘Dumbo,’ Tim Burton Will Release His 10th Film to Gross $100 Million

With ‘Dumbo,’ Tim Burton Will Release His 10th Film to Gross $100 Million
Jordan Peele’s “Us” and its terrific $71 million opening is his second straight critically acclaimed hit, following his Oscar-winning “Get Out.” On its heels comes Tim Burton’s “Dumbo,” the latest in Disney’s live-action recreation of its cartoon classics. Opening projections for that film are lower, around $50 million or so. The two films represent an interesting juxtaposition of two careers — one veteran, one ascendent — with a common source.

Both men broke into public view with unlikely comedy-related hits, then followed up with an inventive original horror-adjunct film that also opened about double the debut. For Burton, it was 1985’s “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure.” At 2019 ticket prices, it grossed $104 million, #19 among its year’s top grossers. “Get Out” was even bigger. Like “Us,” Burton’s “Beetlejuice” was backed by higher budgets, trusting the directors’ vision and originality a second time to terrific results.

We’ll see how Peele’s trajectory continues.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Shazam!’ Film Review: DC Comics Gets a Bouncy Burst of Big-Screen Ebullience

  • The Wrap
‘Shazam!’ Film Review: DC Comics Gets a Bouncy Burst of Big-Screen Ebullience
If the “Wonder Woman” and “Aquaman” movies represented DC Comics’ first big-screen steps away from the austere color palette of the Zach Snyder movies, “Shazam!” takes us deeply into primary colors in a single bound. There’s still a touch of urban decay and kitchen-table warmth on display — this is by no means Warren Beatty’s “Dick Tracy” or a candy-colored Cartoon Network production — but this new DC entry has a lovely lightness, both in the visuals and in its tone.

Before the 1940s serials and the 1970s Saturday-morning TV show, “Shazam!” was born in a magazine called Whiz Comics, published by Fawcett and later acquired by the company that would be known as DC Comics. And to use a 1940s expression, there’s a gee-whiz ebullience to the movie that makes it stand out among the last several decades’ worth of caped crusaders.

Young Billy Batson has spent most
See full article at The Wrap »

Richard Marks, ‘Apocalypse Now,’ ‘Terms of Endearment’ Editor, Dies at 75

  • Variety
Richard Marks, ‘Apocalypse Now,’ ‘Terms of Endearment’ Editor, Dies at 75
Richard Marks, an Oscar-nominated film editor for “Apocalypse Now,” best picture winner “Terms of Endearment,” “Broadcast News,” and “As Good as It Gets,” died unexpectedly on Dec. 31 in New York City, his widow, film editor Barbara Marks, confirmed to Variety. He was 75.

His other editing credits include “The Godfather: Part II,” “You’ve Got Mail,” “Julie & Julia,” “Serpico,” “Dick Tracy,” “Riding in Cars With Boys,” “Bang the Drum Slowly,” “St. Elmo’s Fire,” “Pretty in Pink,” and “Father of the Bride.” Marks was a producer on “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” “What Planet Are You From?,” and “Pennies From Heaven.”

Marks was born on Nov. 10, 1943, in New York. He married his wife Barbara in 1967. Marks became an assistant editor on Francis Ford Coppola’s “Rain People” in 1969, then worked with Dede Allen on “Alice’s Restaurant” and “Little Big Man” in 1970. He became her co-editor on “Serpico.”

Marks received a career
See full article at Variety »

'Terms Of Endearment' editor Richard Marks dies

'Terms Of Endearment' editor Richard Marks dies
Final credit was How Do You Know directed by longtime collaborator James L. Brooks

Richard Marks, the Oscar-nominated editor of such films as Apocalypse Now, Terms Of Endearment, and Broadcast News, has died. He was 75.

Marks passed away unexpectedly on December 31, 2018. He earned nods for all three films as well as for As Good As It Gets, his last Academy nomination in 1998. His range of work was notable, and credits included Serpico, Pretty In Pink, Dick Tracy, St. Elmo’s Fire, You’ve Got Mail, Julie & Julia and Elia Kazan’s final film The Last Tycoon, and he was part
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Beatty Holding Onto His "Dick Tracy" ?

  • SneakPeek
Because of a "pre-existing licensing deal" with Tribune Co. "Archie" Comics had to kill their comic book reboot of plainclothes officer, private detective "Dick Tracy", with actor Warren Beatty ("McCabe & Mrs. Miller") continuing to hold onto the character's rights, despite a 'use it' or 'lose it' clause in a long-standing agreement with Tribune to produce a "Dick Tracy" movie or TV series:

The monthly comic book series was illustrated in a more realistic style, than that of "Dick Tracy" creator Chester Gould...

Created by Gould as a newspaper comic strip, 'Dick Tracy' has appeared in five movie serials from 1937 through 1941...

...six movies, including Beatty's 1990 feature, plus three TV series including animated cartoons.

In a previous announcement of the new comic book series, Tribune Co. was "...very excited to work with Archie Comics. 'Dick Tracy' is an iconic character, who still resonates with his fan base. 

"The reboot of the franchise
See full article at SneakPeek »
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