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New to Streaming: ‘Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood,’ ‘Age Out,’ The Koker Trilogy, and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options—not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves–each week we highlight the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and an archive of past round-ups here.

Adam (Rhys Ernst)

There’s a specific kind of warm, crowd-pleasing aesthetic–often in the coming-of-age subgenre–that seems to find a home among the Sundance programming more so than any other festival. A few years ago, Sean Baker’s Tangerine heralded a major breakthrough for transgender representation in cinema and broke this mold in formally compelling ways. For better or worse, Adam has now arrived to fit more in the aforementioned lighthearted, simplistic, but ultimately empathetic dramedy conceit. – Jordan R. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes

Age Out (A.J. Edwards)

The only thing worse than never getting your happy ending is having it
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Review: The Merciless (2017) by Byun Sung-hyun

The Merciless” opened on 18th May 2017 in South Korea and topped the box-office selling 95,261 tickets. It had its World premiere at The 70th Cannes Film Festival 2017 on 24th May as part of the Midnight Screenings Strand. According to a number of reports, “The Merciless” received the longest standing ovation of all the South Korean films shown including “The Villainess” (Jung Byung-gil: 2017) and “The Day After” (Hong Sang-soo: 2017) at approximately 7 minutes. The film has since been sold to over 100 countries including India and the UK.

The Merciless” screened at the London Korean Film Festival

Starring veteran actor, Sol Kyung-gu as Han Jae Hoe, the leader of a gang, and with Im Siwon as Jo Hyun-soo as his closest confidant, in what should be a break out role for him, “The Merciless” plays with the form and function of the South Korean the gangster genre or jop’ok (meaning organised game members
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Confirmed Plot Details and Star-Cast for “Train to Busan” sequel “Peninsula”

Ever since director Yeon Sang-ho announced that he is working on “Peninsula”, a sequel to his 2016 hit “Train to Busan“, fans have been waiting anxiously for any news on the upcoming project. Today, the confirmed star-cast has been announced, while we also have some plot details for you in addition to the first look at the concept art for the film.

The film, titled “Peninsula”, will be set 4 years after the event of “Train to Busan”, in which time the entire Korean Peninsula has become uninhabitable wasteland. However, Small groups of humans have survived, still trapped and without any certainty of any rescue or respite.

Concept artwork for “Peninsula”

Superstar Kang Dong-won will take Gong Yoo’s place as the lead in the sequel, starring as Jung-suk, alongside actress/singer Lee Jung-hyun, who plays Min-jung, a strong-willed survivor equipped with both unending hope and leadership. Young actress Lee Re, who
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Nearer My Hong Sang-soo To Me

  • MUBI
Hotel by the RiverIsn't the miracle of art how we see the panoply of our own lives via a magical panopticon? Every time we look, we see something that's really all about us. In concert with this, I vaingloriously clutch Walter Pater's concept of how art gives “nothing but the highest quality to your moments as they pass, and simply for those moments' sake.” But each of these moments, for me, is a multiplicity of moments, the past surfacing after bottom-feeding for minutes, months, or years. It might not be easy to see one's life in film—not in the narrative itself, but in the regard of the camera, the editing, how people say things and what their silences are like. It's really only happened for me with Eric Rohmer and now Hong Sang-soo. But it shouldn't be so surprising, since they are both romantics who capture the improvisatory moments in life,
See full article at MUBI »

New Official Us Trailer for Hong Sang-soo's B&W Cafe Drama 'Grass'

"An exquisite hangout movie." The Cinema Guild has debuted an official Us trailer for the film Grass, one of the latest works from prominent Korean filmmaker Hong Sang-soo. This originally premiered at the Berlin Film Festival last year, and also played at the Busan and New York Film Festivals last year, but is only now getting a release in Us cinemas. Grass is Hong Sang-soo's fourth feature film over the last two years - following On the Beach at Night Alone, which also premiered at the Berlin Film Festival, as well as The Day After and Claire's Camera. This one, also shot in black & white, is about a young Korean woman, played by award-winning actress Kim Min-hee, who sits at a cafe in the corner writing on her laptop about people she sees around here and their interactions. Seems like a good time, offering some nice insight. It's only 68 minutes,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Link Tank: Behind The Curve Takes on the Flat-Earth Movement

Spencer Mullen Mar 12, 2019

Behind The Curve, American Gods, Mr. Rogers, and more in today's daily Link Tank!

Psychologists have determined the key trait that psychopaths share.

"What makes a criminal a psychopath? Their grisly deeds and commanding presence attract our attention — look no further than Ted Bundy, the subject of a recent Netflix documentary, and cult leaders like Charles Manson. But despite years of theorizing and research, the mental health field continues to hotly debate what are the defining features of this diagnosis. It might come as a surprise that the most widely used psychiatric diagnostic system in the Us, the Dsm-5, doesn’t include psychopathy as a formal disorder."

Read more at Inverse.

The documentary Behind The Curve takes on the flat earth conspiracy theory.

Please watch Behind the Curve and become obsessed with this notion that the Earth is flat with me. For those unaware, there is a
See full article at Den of Geek »

Trailer for Upcoming Korean Film “A Resistance” by Jo Min-ho

Another year, another film about the Japanese occupation of Korea. A very delicate subject for a lot of people, most films that are based on it are met with mixed reactions. Director Jo Min-ho’s film “A Resistance” focuses on the female prisoners of war.

Synopsis

17-year-old Yu Gwan-sun participates in the Korean independence movement. The country is under the rule of Japan, which annexed the country in 1910. Yu Gwan-Sun is arrested and sent to Seodaemun Prison. There, she is tortured, but she does not yield her will to her oppressors.

The film stars Ko Ah-sung in the central role of Yu Gwan-sun as well as Kim Sae-byuk and Jeong Ha-dam is supporting roles. It releases in South Korea on February 27th, 2019.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Sang-soo Goes for Slight(ly) Sober in B&W Mix-up ‘The Day After’ | Blu-ray Review

Prolific South Korean auteur Hong Sang-soo’s twenty-first feature, The Day After, was also his second time competing for the Palme d’Or when it premiered at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival (where it would leave empty-handed). After a long stint on the festival circuit, where it was perhaps a bit obscured his two other 2017 titles, On the Beach at Night Alone and Claire’s Camera, Us distributor The Cinema Guild finally landed a limited theatrical run in New York in May of 2018.

From our 2017 Cannes Film Festival Review:

“Throughout it all, a series of scenes featuring characters breaking down into ugly, sometimes drunken sobbing is accompanied by the film’s wonderfully overbearing keyboard inspired score, which lends these moments a droll dimension.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Review: Hong Sang-soo's "Hotel By The River" Offers Something New

  • MUBI
The oft-repeated joke about Hong Sang-soo is that he makes the same movie over and over again, but at this stage in his career there is a necessary, if often overlooked asterisk: though the start- and end-points may vary slightly from viewer to viewer, he has carved out distinguishable periods. If periodizing the South Korean director is a manageable task, it’s ultimately a limiting one as well, a way to make a sometimes overwhelming oeuvre more digestible. Hong’s genius becomes most apparent when—as is the case with Yasujiro Ozu, another director who visibly honed and refined his style from film to film—one begins to look at the deviations, foreshadowings, and throwbacks within a particular period. Ozu’s pre-war sound films fascinatingly oscillate between polemical criticisms and more modernist depictions of Japan on the verge of mass societal uprootings, but maintained a commitment to a particular stylistic approach; Hong,
See full article at MUBI »

'The Day After I'm Gone': Film Review | Berlin 2019

'The Day After I'm Gone': Film Review | Berlin 2019
In Israeli director Nimrod Eldar’s feature debut, The Day After I’m Gone (Hayom Sheachrey Lechti), the failed suicide attempt of a teenage girl prompts her father to finally take an interest in her life — or at least to try to. The result is a delicately handled if rather underwhelming story of communication breakdown, where there’s more showing than telling but not enough of an emotional charge, especially in the last act. A premiere in Berlin’s Panorama section should give the film a push abroad.

Eldar delivers some of his strongest scenes during the opening reels,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Hotel by the River’ Trailer: Hong Sang-soo Returns With a Low-Key Rom-Com

  • Indiewire
‘Hotel by the River’ Trailer: Hong Sang-soo Returns With a Low-Key Rom-Com
Hong Sang-soo is among the most prolific filmmakers in the world, and somehow manages to make each new film an event unto itself. “Hotel by the River” is his fifth film in the last two years — “On the Beach at Night Alone,” “Claire’s Camera,” “The Day After,” and “Grass” all preceded it on the festival circuit — and, like all of those earlier works, stars his creative and romantic partner Kim Min-hee (“The Handmaiden”).

After premiering at Locarno last summer, the black-and-white romantic comedy will soon be released theatrically. Watch the trailer below.

Here’s the synopsis: “Two tales intersect at a riverside hotel: an elderly poet (Ki Joo-bong), invited to stay there for free by the owner, summons his two estranged sons, sensing his life drawing to a close; and a young woman (Kim Min-hee) nursing a recently broken heart is visited by a friend who tries to console her.
See full article at Indiewire »

When Hong Sang-soo Pays You A Compliment

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective Solving Puzzles: The Cinema of Hong Sang-soo is showing January 21 – 2019 in the United Kingdom.Can a director have a trademark line of dialogue? Just as the sure presence of a stylistic camera movement (the dramatic zoom) or narrative convention (doubling or dreams), there exists in the films of Korean minimalist auteur Hong Sang-soo a trademark phrase. Three guesses are already too many for these scripts that are heavy on talking, but bereft of easy meaning. A hint: it’s often got to do with looks. The Hongian catchphrase is: “You’re so pretty [너무 예쁘다]!” An impetuous and instigating force, the allure of the physical, or pretty, as descriptor is often arbitrary and inexplicable. The young women who bear the burden of such a compliment are hardly extraordinary. This is not at all to remark on the outward appearances of the actresses who play them, but to note that as a trait,
See full article at MUBI »

The 50 Best 2019 Films We’ve Already Seen

We don’t want to overwhelm you, but while you’re catching up with our top 50 films of 2018, more cinematic greatness awaits in 2019. Ahead of our 100 most-anticipated films (all of which have yet to premiere), we’re highlighting 50 titles we’ve enjoyed on the festival circuit this last year (and beyond) that either have confirmed 2018 release dates or are awaiting a debut date from its distributor. There’s also a handful seeking distribution that we hope will arrive in the next 12 months. U.S. distributors: take note!

The Image Book (Jean-Luc Godard; Jan. 25)

Another miraculous, meticulously feat of cinematic collage, The Image Book finds the French New Wave icon continuing his boundary-pushing editing techniques, both in video and sound (to see this at Alice Tully Hall during New York Film Festival was something truly special). Rory O’Connor said in his Cannes review, “Split into five sections of various lengths titled Remakes,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Ryan Swen’s Top 10 Films of 2018

After the relatively lackluster theatrical release year of 2017, the variety and depth of quality found in 2018 felt like a breath of fresh air. Due to other commitments, I wasn’t able to watch (or write on) as many films as in previous years, but what I did see more than satisfied. True, there were more known quantities, and the pleasures felt slightly more familiar, but even in those environs there is a great deal of comfort and inordinate amounts of true artistic ingenuity to be found.

My favorite films can be roughly divided into the top two films and the other eight, so seismic are the former movies’ impacts, but this should by no means discount the immense value of the rest. A few films that I couldn’t fit into this expanded fifteen but which continue to stick with me, among others: A Star Is Born, Western, and Notes on an Appearance.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Review: Hotel by the River (2018) by Hong Sang-soo

Hong Sang-soo can be a very frustrating artist at times for some. He has developed a formula that he has stuck to so well for so long that audiences can pretty much guess several settings and situations off the bat, a quality that you either love or hate in the director’s works. The main thing that differs are the narrative choices he takes. His latest film, and his second of 2018, “Hotel by the River” however takes a simpler, more linear approach to the narrative. The film premiered at the Locarno Film Festival, where it won Best Actor for Gi Ju-bong.

Hotel by the River” is screening at Five Flavours Festival

On the invitation of the owner, renowned poet Young-hwan has been living at a lovely riverside hotel for the past couple weeks, in the middle of winter. Though he seems hale and hearty, he seems to be under the
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Mexican Revolution: Paula Amor

  • Variety
Los Cabos, Mexico — Paula Amor, the former head of communications of Mexico’s Morelia Festival, now has one of the most exciting jobs in Mexico, running La Corriente del Golfo, the new film-tv production shingle launched by Gael García Bernal and Diego Luna in April.

An inevitable major production force, it also marks a pivot in a film-tv company’s range and focus of operations.

At Canana, Luna and García Bernal leveraged their fame as actors to ensure movies got made at a budgetary level which their directors required. Think Pablo Larraín’s “No.” García Bernal once remarked that launching Ambulante, the touring documentary festival, was one of his proudest achievements. They have now applied this leverage in a different sphere with the launch of The Day After.

“The idea is to provide a base for their projects in film, TV, theater, projects with a social impact,” she explained to
See full article at Variety »

Film Review: Hotel by the River (2018) by Hong Sang-soo

Hong Sang-soo can be a very frustrating artist at times for some. He has developed a formula that he has stuck to so well for so long that audiences can pretty much guess several settings and situations off the bat, a quality that you either love or hate in the director’s works. The main thing that differs are the narrative choices he takes. His latest film, and his second of 2018, “Hotel by the River” however takes a simpler, more linear approach to the narrative. The film premiered at the Locarno Film Festival, where it won Best Actor for Gi Ju-bong.

Hotel by the River is screening at London Korean Film Festival

On the invitation of the owner, renowned poet Young-hwan has been living at a lovely riverside hotel for the past couple weeks, in the middle of winter. Though he seems hale and hearty, he seems to be under
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The Best Films at the 2018 Toronto, Venice, and Telluride Film Festivals

With the Toronto International Film Festival concluding today and Telluride, Venice, and Locarno in the rearview, the first phase of fall film festivals have concluded. Ahead of the New York Film Festival, BFI London Film Festival, Fantastic Fest, AFI Fest, and more we’ve rounded up our favorite films seen over the past month or so, resulting in a selection of premieres to have on your radar.

Stay tuned over the next months (or years) as we bring updates on films as they make their way to screens. One can also click here for a link to all of our festival coverage, including news, trailers, reviews, and much more. As always, thanks for reading, and let us know what you’re most looking forward to in the comments below. Also, for a more substantial look at what’s coming to theaters this season, check out our fall preview, which also includes titles from Cannes,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Frank Serafine, ‘Star Trek’ and ‘Tron’ Sound Editor/Designer, Dies at 65

  • Variety
Frank Serafine, ‘Star Trek’ and ‘Tron’ Sound Editor/Designer, Dies at 65
Hollywood sound maven Frank Serafine died on Wednesday in Palmdale, Calif., according to the Los Angeles County Coroner. He was 65.

According to the a report by the Antelope Valley Times, he was fatally struck by a motorist travelling west on Palmdale Boulevard, and Serafine died at the scene of major head and body trauma.

Serafine was known for his work in sound design, editing, and composing for many hit movies, television shows, shorts, and commercials. His list of credits includes “Star Trek: The Motion Picture” (1979), “Tron” (1982), “Star Trek III: The Search for Spock” (1984), “Manhunter,” “Field of Dreams,” “The Hunt for Red October” (1990), “The Addams Family,” and “Tron: Legacy” (2010). He was sound designer on the 1983 telefilm “The Day After” (which won an Emmy for its sound editing).

In addition to his film and TV credits, he worked on several film and video game projects, including the original “Grand Theft Auto,” “Pocahontas,
See full article at Variety »

‘American Horror Story: Apocalypse’ Episode 1 Recap: It’s The End Of The World As We Know It

  • Deadline
‘American Horror Story: Apocalypse’ Episode 1 Recap: It’s The End Of The World As We Know It
Spoiler Alert: The Recap contains spoilers from tonight’s American Horror Story: Apocalypse season 8 opener “The End”:

Eight seasons in, and one thing you can’t say is that Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk don’t know how to reinvigorate a TV Series. Tonight’s first episode of season 8 of American Horror Story: Apocalypse titled “The End” which has largely been shrouded in secrecy (except for the fact that it’s a crossover over between season 1’s Murder House and season 3’s Coven) literally began with a bang: Nuclear missiles have decimated Hong Kong, Russia, the Baltics and more and the United States isn’t too far behind. A jarring, unnerving sequence which makes us realize just how far TV has come since 1983’s The Day After. Plus they’re some great dark zingers as Beverly Hills just can’t come to grips with the world that’s melting around them.
See full article at Deadline »
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