The South Bank Show (1978) - News Poster

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Movie Poster of the Week: Bill Forsyth’s “Local Hero” and the Business of Marketing Movies

  • MUBI
Back in 1983, when I was but a wee lad in Wales, I saw an episode of the British arts TV program The South Bank Show about the making of Bill Forsyth’s new film Local Hero (my family already being huge Gregory’s Girl fans). It covered the whole process of making the film, from script to screen, but the scene that most interested me, and which had stayed with me ever since, was the marketing meeting in which hot-shot producer David Putnam and the staff of the British branch of 20th Century Fox discussed the various concepts for the film’s poster. I remember thinking that that would be the greatest job in the world, but it was so far from anything I thought I’d really end up doing.The Criterion Collection is releasing Local Hero on Blu-ray and DVD on September 24, and I was very happy to
See full article at MUBI »

Game Of Theories: End Game [Spoilers]

So Season 7 is finally finished and we have only six more episodes left of Game of Thrones in total, there could also be a bit of a wait for Season 8, with many people predicting a 2019 release, and from what HBO has been saying recently, that is looking every likely indeed!

Let’s start by mentioning here that there could be potential Spoilers for Season 8 (If any of this is accurate) and definite Spoilers if you are not finished watching Season 7 yet. You Have Been Warned!!

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With only six epsiodes left, it's hard to get a feel for what theories we have left to explore.

So far in the previous two Game of Theories articles we have made several predictions based on popular fan theories, firstly I have a slight follow up to two of these theories.

UpdateValonqar – You can find this Theory here

If you read the first Game of Theories piece,
See full article at LRM Online »

The Sweet Makers: A Tudor Treat review – not just a sugary concoction

This was familar but pleasurable fare as modern-day confectioners were given the task of making sweets the 16th-century way. Plus: Amma Asante on The South Bank Show

Mmmmm, a BBC primetime programme about sweeties. Candy floss-coloured neon signs. Mildly erotic closeups of coloured confections tumbling forth and melted chocolate dripped and stirred. A few sour fizz balls of history to pop in your cheek. A stately home to satisfy one’s period-drama tooth. This is not the same multimillion pound industry killing us all, the tobacco of the 21st century. It’s suuuuugggggaaaarr. So come, treat yourself to four modern-day confectioners dressed in Tudor garb rolling coriander seeds in 50 layers of sugar for four days.

The Sweet Makers: A Tudor Treat (BBC2) is a familiar pleasure. I’ve seen a version of this programme about 10 times already, the best of which remains 2008’s The Supersizers Go …, when Sue Perkins and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sense8 to My Mother the Car: the TV you think was most correctly killed off

The offensive, the misguided – and the mum reincarnated as an ancient automobile. Here are the programmes our readers feel were rightfully axed

• Heroes to Heil Honey I’m Home – are these the smartest TV cancellations ever?

Some television shows are cruelly ended before their time. Others – Star Trek: Enterprise, I’m looking at you – are quite rightly offed before they have the chance to do any further damage.

Our writers nominated Heroes, Twin Peaks and the bizarre Heil Honey I’m Home! in the latter category. Below, we list our readers’ own suggestions, from a truly sinister 1960s comedy to a terrible 1980s soap opera.

I hear they've cancelled Sense8 - I'd add that to the list. Great opening season but the actual plot got waylaid in favor of tedious romantic entagelements. Said gongs on might have been politically brave, empowering etc etc but I just pined for some action,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Tree of Wooden Clogs

Ermanno Olmi’s three-hour saga is a masterful ethnographic recreation of the long-gone way of life of Italian tenant farmers, virtual slaves working for a landowner. We see the entire agrarian lifestyle, with hints of modern times on the way. An ever-present backdrop of spiritualism and faith keeps the laborers going. Using unprofessional actors and an obsolete dialect, this is listed as one of the great Italian films of the 1970s.

The Tree of Wooden Clogs

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 854

1978 / Color / 1:33 flat full frame / 187 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 14, 2017 / 39.95

Photographed & Edited by Ermanno Olmi

Sets: Enrico Tovaglieri

Costumes: Francesca Zucchelli

Produced by Attillio Torricelli

Written and Directed by Ermanno Olmi

Some filmmakers move quietly from show to show, until a project comes along that’s hailed as a career masterpiece. For Italian Ermanno Olmi the film is The Tree of Wooden Clogs (L’albero degli
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Scott Reviews Ermanno Olmi’s The Tree of Wooden Clogs [Criterion Blu-ray Review]

As the art film revolution of the late 1950s and 1960s gave way to more populist manifestations of its stylistic inventions, so too did the “foreign language drama” become a codified form. As Bergman, Antonioni, Kurosawa, Fellini, and other renowned directors of that earlier time aged out of their peak years of financial viability, a new class found a framework in which to ground their career. They didn’t always have the training in commercial art that their forerunners had worked in and helped develop before eventually resisting, subverting, or overthrowing, but they had the stamina and the work ethic to invest in the trappings that made earlier more revolutionary works so galvanizing.

Ermanno Olmi made his start in documentary shorts, making more than two dozen from 1953-1959, before making his feature narrative debut with Time Stood Still (1959), an avalanche drama about a generational divide. He gained considerably more acclaim for 1961’s Il Posto,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ Trilogy and More Coming to The Criterion Collection in February

Update: The Before Trilogy on Criterion is currently $39.95. Pre-order while you can.

After The Criterion Collection hinted at it and some of the own crew confirmed it, it’s now been officially revealed that one of their most-requested releases will be arriving next year. Richard Linklater‘s Before trilogy will be joining the colelction just a few weeks after Valentine’s Day, on February 28th, featuring new 2K restorations of Before Sunrise and Before Sunset as well as Before Midnight.

Special features include a new discussion with Linklater, Julie Delpy, and Ethan Hawke, moderated by Kent Jones, and Athina Rachel Tsangari’s documentary on the making of the most recent feature. There’s also the full feature-length documentary Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny, and more. While we’re still waiting on cover art for the Linklater set, check out the full details on February’s line-up below, also including one
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Observer/Anthony Burgess awards 2015: Ed Cripps wins second prize

Ed Cripps’s article on a South Bank Show about Paul Greengrass scooped second place at the annual arts journalism awards

Read the winning essay by Leah Broad

The South Bank Show’s episode on Paul Greengrass was the best kind of arts journalism, an accidental celebration of two aesthetic statesmen dense with respect and common ground. Melvyn Bragg and his subject are sophisticatedly mainstream, lustrously haired documentarians with inverse social trajectories, Bragg the Wigton-born baron of the arts, Greengrass the public school anti-establishment renegade, a peer and a parabolist. If Bragg has become our post-Parkinson interviewer-laureate, Greengrass is (along with Shane Meadows) a sort of director-laureate, north-south magnets of tough, humane Englishness.

Bragg’s approach flickers between tutorial, therapy, dance and seduction, occasionally catching himself in the mirror

Related: 2015 Observer/Anthony Burgess prize-winner announced

Greengrass’s films have the impartiality of a Bragg documentary, fragments of dialectic and opinion shored with artistry

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Observer/Anthony Burgess awards 2015: Ed Cripps wins second prize

Ed Cripps’s article on a South Bank Show about Paul Greengrass scooped second place at the annual arts journalism awards

Read the winning essay by Leah Broad

The South Bank Show’s episode on Paul Greengrass was the best kind of arts journalism, an accidental celebration of two aesthetic statesmen dense with respect and common ground. Melvyn Bragg and his subject are sophisticatedly mainstream, lustrously haired documentarians with inverse social trajectories, Bragg the Wigton-born baron of the arts, Greengrass the public school anti-establishment renegade, a peer and a parabolist. If Bragg has become our post-Parkinson interviewer-laureate, Greengrass is (along with Shane Meadows) a sort of director-laureate, north-south magnets of tough, humane Englishness.

Bragg’s approach flickers between tutorial, therapy, dance and seduction, occasionally catching himself in the mirror

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Michael Collins

On the centennial of the Easter Uprising and just a few days past St. Patrick's Day, Whv present's Neil Jordan's biopic epic of Ireland's most beloved patriotic hero -- a militant who stood up to the English occupiers. It's the role that should have cemented Liam Neeson's stardom. Michael Collins Blu-ray The Warner Archive Collection 1996 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 132 min. / Street Date March 22, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Liam Neeson, Aidan Quinn, Julia Roberts, Alan Rickman, Stephen Rea, Brendan Gleeson, Charles Dance, Jonathan Rhys Myers, Ian McElhinney. Cinematography Chris Menges Film Editors J. Patrick Duffner, Tony Lawson Original Music Elliott Goldenthal Produced by Stephen Wooley Written and Directed by Neil Jordan

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Irish politics must be in ascendance, as this St. Patrick's Day Warner Bros. has bumped its Irish patriot biopic up to Blu-ray status. A DVD of it came out only a year before. It's
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Criterion Collection: The French Lieutenant’s Woman | Blu-ray Review

In the decades since its premiere, The French Lieutenant’s Woman is now most commonly discussed for its placement in the extensive awards resume of its star Meryl Streep, since it was her follow-up to her Best Supporting Actress win for 1979’s Kramer vs. Kramer and would serve as netting her first nomination in a leading category (it’s also interesting to note Streep won the Golden Globe but ultimately, perhaps ironically, lost to Katharine Hepburn, the iconic performer who previously held the most nominations record). But at the time of its release, the final product was the result of a decade long ordeal, seeing many auteurs, actors, and screenwriters attempting to adapt the notoriously ‘unfilmable’ 1969 novel by John Fowles, an experiment in form termed “post-modern historical fiction.” Directed by Karel Reisz, the Czech-born British auteur a British New Wave progenitor of the realist strain of filmmaking, it remains one of his most prolific works.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

George Rr Martin reveals why he turned down Game of Thrones movie: 'No is the sexiest word'

George Rr Martin reveals why he turned down Game of Thrones movie: 'No is the sexiest word'
Game of Thrones fans finally have an answer as to why it took 15 years for George Rr Martin's novels to get a live-action adaptation.

Martin offered a detailed explanation as to why he spent a decade opposing a Game of Thrones film series in an interview with The South Bank Show.

Be the first to own Game of Thrones season 5 digitally with a branded iPad

Game of Thrones 'The Dance of Dragons' recap: Devastating and exhilarating

"It took Peter Jackson three movies to make Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, and he still had to cut things," Martin told host Melvyn Bragg.

"It would take three movies for A Storm of Swords alone! And if you figure like two movies for A Game of Thrones, and two for A Clash of Kings, you're already up to seven movies and you're halfway through the series.

"Nobody's going to commit to that, and,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

The Criterion Collection announces August line-up

The Criterion Collection has announced its new line-up for August, with some more classic films being added to the collection. On August 4th Jules Dassin’s Night and the City is released, followed on August 11th by Karel Reisz’s The French Lieutenant’s Woman starring Meryl Streep, and on August 18th Brian De Palma’s Dressed to Kill starring Michael Caine and François Truffaut’s Day for Night. Finally on August 25th the Dardenne Brothers superb Two Days, One Night starring Oscar Winner Marion Cotillard.

You can check out the full press release details below, as well as the artwork for each release.

Night and the City

Two-bit hustler Harry Fabian (Richard Widmark) longs for a life of ease and plenty. Trailed by an inglorious history of go-nowhere schemes, he tries to hatch a lucrative plan with a famous wrestler. But there is no easy money in this underworld of shifting alliances,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Daniel Radcliffe: 'I find it hard to watch early Harry Potter movies'

Daniel Radcliffe: 'I find it hard to watch early Harry Potter movies'
Daniel Radcliffe has admitted to finding the early Harry Potter films "hard to watch".

The actor - who played the young wizard in all eight films - said that his performances in earlier instalments of the series lacked "nuance".

Speaking to Melvyn Bragg on The South Bank Show, Radcliffe said: "If we had a singing scene, we had a singing teacher come in. If we had a dance scene, a dance coach would come in.

"We never had an acting coach in all the time we were there and there were times we could have done with one. I know I could have.

"There wasn't a lot of nuance to my performance when we were young and I find those early films very hard to watch personally.

"There were certain things I just didn't know. There were certain things like how to break down a script, or even certain questions
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Watch: Werner Herzog Names His Favorite England Soccer Player Plus 1-Hour TV Special From 1982

Generally, The Playlist offices don't care much for sports, but there are definitely more than a few of us watching the World Cup. And it has been a helluva tournament so far, with defending champions Spain out of the contest already, along with England, who just couldn't get it together. So for all of you in the U.K. mourning your early exit from the World Cup, here's a little cinephile treat. Back in 1982, ITV focused an entire episode of "The South Bank Show" to Werner Herzog, and as usual, you should probably watch it. Across 60 minutes, it jumps around with the director, highlighting his films to date, talking with him about his work with Klaus Kinski, showing him reading dramatically on a train and ... talking about soccer. In fact, you'll see Herzog play soccer, as he talks about his fave English footballer Glenn Hoddle. We wonder what he thinks of English football now?
See full article at The Playlist »

On my radar: Matt Cain's cultural highlights

The arts aficionado, TV presenter and writer talks about a novel set in 1820s Iceland, an abstract Royal Ballet, Jean Paul Gaultier's bustiers and Beyoncé's experimental production

Born in Bury, Greater Manchester, Matt Cain spent seven years as an executive producer and director on The South Bank Show. In 2010, he was appointed to the on-screen role of Channel 4 News' first ever culture editor, where he reported on the Women's prize for fiction, the Mercury music prize and the Turner prize. In 2012, Cain presented the More4 series What Makes a Masterpiece? and in 2013 was a judge for the Costa Book awards. He left his role as culture editor last July to pursue his career as a writer of fiction. His debut novel, Shot Through the Heart, is out now, with a second book due to be published in April next year.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

New on Video: ‘Tess’

Tess

Written by Gérard Brach, Roman Polanski, and John Brownjohn

Directed by Roman Polanski

France/UK, 1979

Roman Polanski revealed an exceptional eye for gripping visual design in his earliest films. In those works, like Knife in the Water, Cul-de-sac, Repulsion, Rosemary’s Baby and, somewhat later, The Tenant, most of this pictorial construction was derivative of themes, and subsequent depictions of, confinement, claustrophobic paranoia, and severely taut antagonism. In terms of visual and narrative scope, Chinatown opened things up somewhat, but it was with Tess, his 1979 adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s “Tess of the d’Urbervilles,” that Polanski significantly broadened his canvas to encompass the sweeping tale of the Victorian era loves and conflicts of this eponymous peasant girl.

Polanski speaks to this distinction during an interview in the newly released Criterion Collection Blu-ray/DVD of Tess. In discussing the film for the French TV program Cine regards, the director
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Reviews: Polanski's "Tess" (1979) And Godard's "Breathless" (1960), Dual Format Criterion Releases

  • CinemaRetro
Two European Gems

By Raymond Benson

February is a good month for The Criterion Collection. Last week we reviewed the company’s restored Blu-ray/DVD dual format release of Foreign Correspondent. Coming quickly on its heels are two more excellent releases on this red carpet of home video labels.

First up—Tess, directed by Roman Polanski. This 1979 picture—released in the U.S. in 1980 and nominated for Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Score) and winner of three (Art Direction, Cinematography, and Costumes) is a scrumptious, beautiful depiction of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. It is a very faithful adaptation, although several scenes from the book are left out or shortened. Still, the film is nearly three hours long—but don’t let that scare you, it’s never dull. I have to confess that I fell in love with Nastassja Kinski when I first
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Blu-ray Review: Memory of Adolescence Captured in Mesmerizing ‘The Long Day Closes’

What do you remember of your childhood? Other than major events, the majority of your memories are probably vaguely defined and few films have more deftly captured that hazy recollection of youth than Terence Davies’ riveting “The Long Day Closes.” More of an art piece than a traditional narrative, the film, recently added to The Criterion Collection, may first seem slow but becomes transfixing in the deliberate way that its creator doesn’t seek to replicate history but his memory of it.

Rating: 4.5/5.0

With dozens of songs, many of them in their entirety (we hear three before a line of dialogue), and some still shots that have the beauty of an artist’s eye, “The Long Day Closes” is a beautifully conceived and executed. A mother singing quietly to herself as she makes tea, the reflection of rain on a boy’s ceiling, the escape of the cinema — “The Long Day Closes
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Criterion Collection: The Long Day Closes | Blu-ray Review

The inimitable Terence Davies gets his first Criterion treatment this month with his 1992 title, The Long Day Closes, a superb memory poem drenched in melancholy nostalgia. A follow-up to the much more dark and brutal Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), Davies returns once more to the memoirs of a ravaged childhood, further expanded upon from his first three short films which comprised The Terence Davies Trilogy (1976-1984). Swimming freely between quiet fantasy sequences and recollections of free associations as we drift in and out of abandoned ramshackle buildings of the past like a restless spirit, there is a delicate and fragile longing in Davies’ second feature, a ruminative exploration absent from the pained dirge of his previous film.

Bud (Leigh McCormack) is a bright and lonely 11 year old boy growing up in 1950’s Liverpool. Absent a father figure, Bud spends most of his time at home with his mother (Marjorie Yates
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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