Bang the Drum Slowly (1973) - News Poster

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Holocaust

This four part, eight hour miniseries turns the fate of a family of German Jews into a sprawling drama that covers all the bases of the holocaust horror. It was strong stuff and a big Emmy winner, boosting the careers of James Woods and Michael Moriarty. His warped charisma as a psychotic Nazi is so good that he’s consistently more interesting than the courageous victims. As for Meryl Streep, she became an instant star — everybody remembered her from this. Although it’s been called ‘The Holocaust for Dummies,’ it’s a quality show. Looking from today’s perspective, after forty years of Political Correctness adjustments, I’m not sure any two viewers will react in quite the same way.

Holocaust

Blu-ray

CBS Television Studio / Paramount

1978 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 7 hours, 36 min. / Street Date September 24, 2019 / 43.19

Starring: James Woods, Meryl Streep, Michael Moriarty, Joseph Bottoms, Rosemary Harris, Fritz Weaver, Tovah Feldshuh, Deborah Norton,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Martin Scorsese Breaks Down Five Iconic Scenes from His Career

At this year’s Tribeca Film Festival, Robert De Niro hosted friend and collaborator Martin Scorsese for a freewheeling conversation about the director’s career. They discussed his titles ranging from their 1982 flop The King of Comedy (and how it was resuscitated by film culture) to Scorsese’s massive success with Leonardo DiCaprio in 2013’s The Wolf of Wall Street.

Seated at the Beacon Theatre, the duo tie their latest project, The Irishman, into Scorsese’s oeuvre of operatic scoundrels. De Niro introduced the book I Heard You Paint Houses to Scorsese, which the director chose as the feature film to follow his 2016 religious epic Silence. “You profoundly feel the heart of this character and the situation. It’s a universal story that happens to be set in that world,” Scorsese said of Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran’s story, played by De Niro. Scorsese’s other Irishman tidbit is the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Television’s Lost Classics Vol One: John Cassavetes

John Cassavetes springs forth as a major 1950s talent in these two ‘Primetime Special’ dramatic plays broadcast live on ABC and CBS. Crime in the Streets is the Reginald Rose classic directed by Sidney Lumet; No Right to Kill is a ‘culture for the masses’ adaptation of Crime and Punishment. Cassavetes’ co-stars are Robert Preston, Glenda Farrell, Terry Moore and Robert H. Harris.

Television’s Lost Classics

Volume One John Cassavetes

Crime in the Streets; No Right to Kill

Blu-ray

Vci

1955-’56 / B&W / 1:33 Kinescope / 2 x 60 min. / Street Date September 11, 2018 / 18.99 (Amazon)

Starring: John Cassavetes, Robert Preston, Glenda Farrell, Mark Rydell, Terry Moore, Robert H. Harris.

Directed by Sidney Lumet and Buzz Kulik

Remember the movie Network, when William Holden’s character says he’s going to write a glowing memoir about his ‘good old days’ in the Golden Era of Live TV in New York? That was in 1975, just
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Richard Marks, ‘Apocalypse Now,’ ‘Terms of Endearment’ Editor, Dies at 75

  • Variety
Richard Marks, ‘Apocalypse Now,’ ‘Terms of Endearment’ Editor, Dies at 75
Richard Marks, an Oscar-nominated film editor for “Apocalypse Now,” best picture winner “Terms of Endearment,” “Broadcast News,” and “As Good as It Gets,” died unexpectedly on Dec. 31 in New York City, his widow, film editor Barbara Marks, confirmed to Variety. He was 75.

His other editing credits include “The Godfather: Part II,” “You’ve Got Mail,” “Julie & Julia,” “Serpico,” “Dick Tracy,” “Riding in Cars With Boys,” “Bang the Drum Slowly,” “St. Elmo’s Fire,” “Pretty in Pink,” and “Father of the Bride.” Marks was a producer on “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” “What Planet Are You From?,” and “Pennies From Heaven.”

Marks was born on Nov. 10, 1943, in New York. He married his wife Barbara in 1967. Marks became an assistant editor on Francis Ford Coppola’s “Rain People” in 1969, then worked with Dede Allen on “Alice’s Restaurant” and “Little Big Man” in 1970. He became her co-editor on “Serpico.”

Marks received a career
See full article at Variety »

Richard Marks Dies: Four-Time Editing Oscar Nominee Who Worked On ‘Apocalypse Now’ & ‘As Good As It Gets’ Was 75

  • Deadline
Richard Marks, a film editor who scored four Oscar nominations during a prolific 50-year career and earned a Career Achievement Award from the American Cinema Editors, has died at 75. Ace executive director Jenni McCormack confirmed that Marks died December 31 but gave no other details.

Marks earned his Best Film Editing Academy Award noms for Francis Ford Coppola’s seminal Vietnam War film Apocalypse Now (1979) and a trio of pics by James L. Brooks: As Good As It Gets (1997) — which he also co-produced — Broadcast News (1987) and Best Picture Oscar winner Terms of Endearment (1983). He also edited Coppola’s Best Picture winner The Godfather Part II and Brooks’ I’ll Do Anything, How Do You Know and Spanglish, among dozens of other credits..

“Richie Marks was, from his first films, one of the very best editors ever,” Brooks said in a statement. “I and others, including every actor whose performances he so lovingly shaped,
See full article at Deadline »

'Bang the Drum Slowly': THR's 1973 Review

On Aug. 26, 1973, Paramount unveiled baseball drama Bang the Drum Slowly at its world premiere in New York. The film went on to nab an Oscar nomination in the supporting actor category for Vincent Gardenia at the 46th Academy Awards ceremony. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

The film version of Mark Harris' novel Bang the Drum Slowly, produced by Maurice and Lois Rosenfield and directed by John Hancock from Harris' screenplay, is not a completely successful movie. But it has three uncommonly fine performances by Robert De Niro, Michael Moriarty and Vincent Gardenia, a rich sense of character ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Georgann Johnson Dead at 91

Georgann Johnson, best known for her roles on TV and Broadway, died on June 4. She was 91.

The actress died in Los Angeles, daughter Carol Prager announced in the obituary section of the Los Angeles Times.

Johnson was born on August 15, 1926, in Decorah, Iowa, and worked as a character actress in more than 115 films and TV series including Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Too Close For Comfort and Archie Bunker’s Place.

It was in the 1953 Broadway revival of "Room Service" that Johnson met actor and future husband, Stanley Prager. After Prager's death in 1972, she was married to Honorable Jack Tenner, a Superior Court Judge and civil rights activist, until his death in 2008.

Other notable credits included Life Sentence (1953) opposite James Dean, Bang the Drum Slowly (1956) opposite Paul Newman and Midnight Cowboy (1969), which won the Oscar for Best Picture.

Johnson also appeared in Three's Company as John Ritter's mother in 1983.

On daytime soap operas,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

‘Midnight Cowboy’ Actress Georgann Johnson Dies at 91

  • Variety
‘Midnight Cowboy’ Actress Georgann Johnson Dies at 91
Midnight Cowboy” actress Georgann Johnson died June 4 in Los Angeles. She was 91.

With a career spanning six decades, the Iowa native first appeared on television in 1950s commercials, later appearing opposite James Dean in TV drama “Life Sentence” (1953).

Johnson’s live TV performances include the original production of “Bang the Drum Slowly” (1956) with Paul Newman as well as playing Tony Randall’s wife in “Mr. Peepers” from 1952 to 1955.

The actress recalled: “It was a terribly good and terribly funny show and yet very gentle. I realized how much a special thing it was at the time.”

Her dream of singing in a Big Band came to fruition in Steve Allen’s “Songs for Sale” (1950-1952), a talent show for aspiring songwriters. Peggy Lee performed Johnson’s song, which won the prize and made an impression on Allen. He later cast her in the live television musical “The Bachelor.” In 1954, Johnson
See full article at Variety »

Robert De Niro To Be Honored With Brass Ring Award at 2018 Carousel of Hope Ball

Event chair and host Barbara Davis announced today that Academy award-winning actor, producer and director Robert De Niro will be honored with the “Brass Ring Award” at The 2018 Carousel of Hope Ball on Saturday, October 6.

The biennial event is dedicated to increasing awareness for diabetes, and raising funds for clinical care and diabetes research at the Barbara Davis Center For Diabetes. Longtime supporter, Robert De Niro, will receive the award at this year’s ball for his humanitarian efforts and continued support of the cause. The “Brass Ring Award” was named after the elusive brass ring that carousel riders would try to catch when the ride first became popular. Now universally recognized as a symbol of achievement, the brass ring represents the ultimate goal of finding a cure for diabetes. “Brass Ring Award” recipients exemplify the dedication and strength that brings the Children’s Diabetes Foundation and the Barbara Davis
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Acting Oscar Upsets Could Go to ‘The Shape of Water’ and ‘Lady Bird’

As Oscar voters ponder their ballots, anything can happen. Yes, the four acting races look like locks: With precursor SAG, Golden Globe, Critics Choice and BAFTA awards going to the same four actors, two from “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell), one from “I, Tonya” (Allison Janney) and one from “Darkest Hour” (Gary Oldman), things could get boring indeed.

Still, while Rockwell and Oldman are locks — they both tower over the two actor categories — the actress races may be closer than we think. Am I going to tell you to change your votes and risk losing your Oscar pool? No. All four winners are still the safe bet. But sometimes Academy voters are not the same as the other groups: they take the high road, go classy, reward the career actor’s actor with a statue — or decide a favorite film has to win something. Victory
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Acting Oscar Upsets Could Go to ‘The Shape of Water’ and ‘Lady Bird’

  • Indiewire
As Oscar voters ponder their ballots, anything can happen. Yes, the four acting races look like locks: With precursor SAG, Golden Globe, Critics Choice and BAFTA awards going to the same four actors, two from “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell), one from “I, Tonya” (Allison Janney) and one from “Darkest Hour” (Gary Oldman), things could get boring indeed.

Still, while Rockwell and Oldman are locks — they both tower over the two actor categories — the actress races may be closer than we think. Am I going to tell you to change your votes and risk losing your Oscar pool? No. All four winners are still the safe bet. But sometimes Academy voters are not the same as the other groups: they take the high road, go classy, reward the career actor’s actor with a statue — or decide a favorite film has to win something. Victory
See full article at Indiewire »

From Sam Rockwell to Patrick Stewart: Ranking Contenders for Best Supporting Actor Oscar

From Sam Rockwell to Patrick Stewart: Ranking Contenders for Best Supporting Actor Oscar
There’s more than a few good men lining up for Supporting Actor recognition at this year’s Oscars, and they all won’t make the cut. Here’s a roundup of who’s likely to land a nomination slot, as well as a few worthy dark-horse contenders.

Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson

From Venice to Toronto to the Hollywood Foreign Press, “Three Billboards from Ebbing, Missouri” has been wowing audiences and critics. Actually, if the Screen Actors Guild is any indication, the Ozark-set dramedy may score three acting Oscar contenders — Golden Globe winners Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell, as well as Woody Harrelson. It’s a rare sign of strength.

The veteran character actors starred together in McDonagh’s raucous comedy “Seven Psychopaths.” This time out, uncharacteristically, two-time Oscar nominee Harrelson (“The People vs. Larry Flynt,” “The Messenger”) is the straight man of the piece as empathetic cancer-ridden Sheriff Willoughby,
See full article at Indiewire »

From Sam Rockwell to Patrick Stewart: Ranking Contenders for Best Supporting Actor Oscar

From Sam Rockwell to Patrick Stewart: Ranking Contenders for Best Supporting Actor Oscar
There’s more than a few good men lining up for Supporting Actor recognition at this year’s Oscars, and they all won’t make the cut. Here’s a roundup of who’s likely to land a nomination slot, as well as a few worthy dark-horse contenders.

Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson

From Venice to Toronto to the Hollywood Foreign Press, “Three Billboards from Ebbing, Missouri” has been wowing audiences and critics. Actually, if the Screen Actors Guild is any indication, the Ozark-set dramedy may score three acting Oscar contenders — Golden Globe winners Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell, as well as Woody Harrelson. It’s a rare sign of strength.

The veteran character actors starred together in McDonagh’s raucous comedy “Seven Psychopaths.” This time out, uncharacteristically, two-time Oscar nominee Harrelson (“The People vs. Larry Flynt,” “The Messenger”) is the straight man of the piece as empathetic cancer-ridden Sheriff Willoughby,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Bang the Drum Slowly”

Bang the Drum Slowly” was released in 1973. It is a well-known American sports drama that was directed by John D. Hancock. In this film, the star of the show is a baseball player who has a terminal illness and limited intellect, and his more skilled, smarter teammate takes a keen and impactful interest in his life. It is a film adaptation of a baseball novel from 1956 written by Mark Harris. While the film was watched, and is still watched today, there are certain bits of information that are surprising to some fans. Here you can learn 10 interesting

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Bang the Drum Slowly
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Baby (1973)

Only in the ‘70s, man, only in the ‘70s. Long before PC culture invaded popular entertainment, movies were the haven of the taboo, a safe house for ideas two steps from the norm. Now, many of these films of perversion were relegated to grindhouse theatres and the third feature of a Dusk Til Dawn showing at your local Drive-In. But occasionally a film will crawl towards the mainstream and plop itself down, bawling for attention. The Baby (1973) is one such film, so twisted in conception that it’s hard to believe it would be released in any decade. Except the ‘70s of course, where you could even get the director of a Dirty Harry and a Planet of the Apes flick to helm it.

Distributed by Scotia International in March, The Baby was given a limited theatrical release; and that’s really for the best – as much as the film
See full article at DailyDead »

Why 'Slap Shot' Captures the 1970s Better Than Any Other Sports Movie

Why 'Slap Shot' Captures the 1970s Better Than Any Other Sports Movie
Over the last few decades – thanks in part to movies and TV shows like Dazed and Confused, Boogie Nights, Anchorman and HBO's Vinyl – there’s been a pronounced pop cultural tendency to reduce the 1970s to little more than a fabulous parade of campy signifiers like mirrored disco balls, brightly-painted muscle cars, platform shoes, bellbottomed jeans, tube tops, Afro hairdos, pornstaches and piles of cocaine.

It's an understandable impulse, of course. (Who doesn't love Afros or piles of cocaine?) But taking such a superficial approach to the seventies means glossing over the grittier,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Best Baseball Movies

In the midst of March Madness and with the Kentucky Derby around the corner, the first pitch of baseball season is almost here.

A quote from Field Of Dreams best describes America’s national pastime, “The one constant throughout the years has been baseball.”

To mark the start of the 2016 season, here’s our list of the Best Baseball movies.

The Bad News Bears

Considered by some to be the best baseball movie ever, the film celebrates its 40th anniversary this month (April 7, 1976). In an article from the NY Daily News, one line reads, “It is a movie that someone like the late Philip Seymour Hoffman called his favorite, and one which resonates on many levels today, with all different generations.”

Who are we to argue with greatness?

After skewering all-American subjects such as politics (The Candidate) and beauty pageants (Smile), director Michael Ritchie naturally set his sights on the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

John Hancock's 'The Looking Glass' is Coming to Theaters Via First Run Features

Dorothy Tristan wrote and stars in the latest film from Academy Award® nominated director John Hancock,"The Looking Glass," set to open in New York at the Cinema Village, and in Los Angeles at the Fine Arts on October 23, 2015.

“I was very moved by the film. Dorothy gives an extremely touching performance, one that is definitely worthy of an Academy Award nomination,” said film critic Kathleen Carroll.

The official synopsis reads: "After losing her mother, troubled 13-year-old Julie must go to Indiana to live with her grandmother, Karen. Karen, a former star of stage and screen, now facing the end of her life, wants desperately to connect with her granddaughter in a meaningful way and pass on all she knows before it's too late. But the two of them—each stubborn in her own way—butt heads at every turn. Soon, Karen makes a remarkable discovery: Julie’s powerful, unique singing voice. Will the sudden discovery of Julie’s talent be enough to bring the two together and allow Karen to pass on her legacy? This beautifully shot film shows a tenderness in its treatment of family matters such as depression and low self-esteem. In watching the story unfold, the watcher is touched at the beauty and sadness of the rebellious young girl. Our hopes for her finding herself and allowing her voice to be shared with the world engages as the movie unfolds. This is the sort of film families with pre-teen and teen girls and boys would enjoy together. Then one talks of 'family entertainment,' this is the film that fits for a pleasurable movie day"

Married for forty years, "The Looking Glass" finds Dorothy Tristan and John Hancock collaborating for the seventh time. Since 1994, when their house was destroyed in the Malibu fire, they’ve been living and working in La Porte County, Indiana, and turning that little corner of the Midwest into a filmmaking hub.

Dorothy appeared in the director's “California Dreaming” and wrote “Steal the Sky,” “Weeds,” “A Piece of Eden” and “Suspended Animation.” She also did the final polish on Hancock's Christmas classic, “Prancer.” Tristan began her acting career in theatre, playing Charlotte Corday in the national touring production of “Marat/Sade.” She was Helena in “Midsummer Night’s Dream” and Lady Macduff in “Macbeth” at Stratford, Connecticut. She played Blanche Dubois opposite Jon Voight in “Streetcar Named Desire.” She had leading or supporting roles in a number of major motion pictures including “Klute,” “Man on a Swing,” and Aram Avakian’s “End of the Road” with James Earl Jones and Stacy Keach.

Hancock’s feature film credits include “Bang The Drum Slowly,” “California Dreaming,” “Let’s Scare Jessica to Death,” “Baby Blue Marine,” “Weeds,’ and the Christmas classic “Prancer,” starring Sam Elliott, Cloris Leachman, Abe Vigoda and Rebecca Harrell, which he shot "The Looking Glass" on his family’s fruit farm in Laporte County. His current production, , brings him home again, physically and emotionally. He says he “tried to catch the sense of returning to this place where you grew up, and falling in love with what you were not truly able to see before.

The story hits close to home for Hancock and Tristan. “Dorothy and I have reached a point in our lives where we’ve thought a lot about what we’ve accomplished, and what kind of legacy we hope to leave behind once we’re no longer here,” says Hancock, 76.

“You always hope you’ve had some type of impact on people, that what you did with your life meant something to people. That’s what this story is about: reaching out to those closest to you and imparting on them all your knowledge, all your life lessons so a part of you lives on.

“You’re preparing the next generation for greatness. That’s true not just for the characters in the film, but for Dorothy and me, that maybe we can inspire a new generation of filmmakers to create movies that mean something to people.”
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Hollywood Film Awards billed as the launch of awards season

dick clark productions announced today that two-time Oscar-winning actor Robert De Niro will be honored with the “Hollywood Career Achievement Award.” The awards ceremony will take place at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, on November 1, 2015. The Hollywood Film Awards, the official launch of the awards season®, has recognized excellence in the art of cinema and filmmaking for 18 years, honoring some of the world’s biggest stars. Honorees have gone on to garner many Oscar nominations and wins. “The Hollywood Film Awards is an incredible brand, previewing some of the biggest movies and stars of the year, while launching the award season,” said Allen Shapiro, CEO of dick clark productions. “We are honored to have Robert De Niro as this year’s recipient of the Hollywood Career Achievement Award.” Robert De Niro is currently starring in Warner Bros. Pictures’ “The Intern” and will appear next in 20th Century Fox’s “Joy,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

It’s Opening Week: Best Baseball Movies

Is this heaven? Nope, it’s Opening Week.

Recently Mlb rounded up a group of players to recite, word for word, James Earl Jones’ famous “people will come, Ray” speech from Field Of Dreams.

Wamg declares America’s national pastime, Baseball, to be the official sport of movie fans everywhere. As Brad Pitt said in Moneyball, “How can you not be romantic about Baseball?”

It all started Sunday night with the Cardinals at the Cubs with St. Louis winning 3 to 0.

To celebrate the first pitch of Opening Week, here’s our list of the best Baseball movies.

The Rookie

One of the best baseball biopics to come along over the years, The Rookie, starring Dennis Quaid, tells the true story of Jim Morris, a man who finally gets a shot at his lifelong dream-pitching in the big leagues. A high school science teacher/baseball coach, Morris’ players make a bet with him:if they win district,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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