Klute (1971) - News Poster

(1971)

News

‘Seberg’ screenwriters Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse on Kristen Stewart ‘channeling Jean’ [Exclusive Video Interview]

‘Seberg’ screenwriters Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse on Kristen Stewart ‘channeling Jean’ [Exclusive Video Interview]
At one point in “Seberg,” the new film about actress/activist Jean Seberg, a journalist asks the young star why she thinks so many people became obsessed with her after seeing “Breathless.” For the film’s screenwriters, Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse, it stemmed from that classic French New Wave film but it became an obsession upon learning of Seberg’s involvement with the Black Panther Party and her subsequent investigation by the FBI. As Waterhouse observes in an exclusive new interview with Gold Derby, Seberg was “so quintessentially American and yet she fits into that cool Parisian world as well. She’s just got this energy which is very, very difficult to define.” Watch the video interview with Shrapnel and Waterhouse above.

SEEWhich ‘Twilight’ star will win Oscar first: Kristen Stewart or Robert Pattinson? [Poll]

The duo first thought about adapting Seberg’s story to the big screen 15 years ago,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sliff 2019 – They Shoot Horses Don’T They? Golden Anniversary Screening at The St. Louis Public Library November 17th

” I may not know a winner when I see one, but I sure as hell can spot a loser. “

They Shoot Horses Don’t They? will be screening at the St. Louis Public Library (1301 Olive Street St. Louis) on November 17th at 1:30pm as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. They Shoot Horses Don’t They? is part of Cinema St. Louis’ Golden Anniversary of films made in 1969. This is a Free event. With an intro and post-film discussion by We Are Movie Geeks’ own Tom Stockman. A Facebook invite can b found Here

In Depression-era America, desperation spawned a bizarre fad: the dance marathon. Couples competed to stay on their feet for thousands of hours, and audiences flocked to watch. But Gloria doesn’t think of herself as a spectacle. She is a fierce, unforgiving contestant in a battle she’s determined to win.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Roy Scheider movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Jaws,’ ‘All That Jazz,’ ‘The French Connection’

  • Gold Derby
Roy Scheider movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Jaws,’ ‘All That Jazz,’ ‘The French Connection’
Roy Scheider would’ve celebrated his 87th birthday on November 10, 2019. Though he’ll forever be known as Chief Brody, the shark-hunting sheriff in Steven Spielberg‘s “Jaws” (1975), the Oscar-nominated actor starred in a number of classics throughout his career before his death in 2008. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

SEESteven Spielberg movies: All 31 feature films ranked from worst to best

Born in 1932 in Orange, New Jersey, Scheider’s journey towards the screen wasn’t exactly a straightforward one. After trying his hand at amateur boxing and serving in the military, he turned in his gloves and his uniform to set his sights on bit parts in movies and television. His big breakthrough came with William Friedkin‘s “The French Connection” (1971), a gritty police drama for which he earned an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor (the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Roy Scheider movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Roy Scheider movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Roy Scheider would’ve celebrated his 87th birthday on November 10, 2019. Though he’ll forever be known as Chief Brody, the shark-hunting sheriff in Steven Spielberg‘s “Jaws” (1975), the Oscar-nominated actor starred in a number of classics throughout his career before his death in 2008. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1932 in Orange, New Jersey, Scheider’s journey towards the screen wasn’t exactly a straightforward one. After trying his hand at amateur boxing and serving in the military, he turned in his gloves and his uniform to set his sights on bit parts in movies and television. His big breakthrough came with William Friedkin‘s “The French Connection” (1971), a gritty police drama for which he earned an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor (the film won five prizes including Best Picture). He returned to the
See full article at Gold Derby »

AFI Fest Adds ‘The Two Popes,’ ‘Aeronauts,’ Alan Pakula Tribute

  • Variety
The American Film Institute has added “The Two Popes” and “The Aeronauts” as galas during the upcoming AFI Fest along with a tribute to the late director Alan Pakula.

AFI had previously announced that the romantic drama “Queen & Slim” would launch the 33rd annual festival on Nov. 14 and close with the world premiere of Anthony Mackie and Samuel L. Jackson’s drama “The Banker” on Nov. 21. All galas will take place at the Tcl Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

Inspired by a true story, “The Two Popes” stars Anthony Hopkins as Pope Benedict XVI and Jonathan Pryce as the future Pope Francis in a verbal battle of wits over the future direction of the Catholic Church. It will screen at the Chinese on Nov. 18. The film is produced by Netflix, which has scheduled a limited theatrical release on Nov. 27 in the U.S. prior to its release on streaming on Dec.
See full article at Variety »

AFI Fest rounds out gala section with two titles from streaming platforms

Festival runs from November 14-21.

AFI Fest top brass have rounded out the galas line-up with the addition of Netflix’s The Two Popes and The Aeronauts from Amazon Studios.

The Two Popes will screen on November 18 and stars Jonathan Pryce as Pope Francis and Anthony Hopkins as Pope Benedict XVI. Fernando Meirelles directed the story about a series of conversations that took place between the two men in and around the Vatican in late 2012 and 2013.

Benedict, who would announce his shock resignation from the Papacy in February 2013, summoned Argentina’s Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio – who would later succeed him as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Donald Sutherland Reflects on a Life and Career Marked by Cinema

  • Variety
Donald Sutherland Reflects on a Life and Career Marked by Cinema
In a loose and free-flowing on-stage interview held at the Lumière Festival this past Sunday, Donald Sutherland reflected on his decade-spanning career with a tone that mixed personal irreverence alongside genuine veneration for the art form that brought him this far.

“I love filmmakers, I really do,” said the Canadian actor, who delighted the local audience by turning down a translator and speaking in fluent French. “They are part of my life, and I named my four sons after directors I worked with.”

The actor named his first son after “Castle of the Living Dead” director Warren Kiefer, his second after “Don’t Look Now” director Nicolas Roeg, and his third in honor of personal friend Frederic Rossif, but ran into a bit of a snag once his fourth son came into the world.

“I wanted to name another son after [“Ordinary People” director] Robert Redford, but when then the
See full article at Variety »

Cate Blanchett crushes all actresses as your choice to be the next to win a 3rd Academy Award [Poll Results]

Cate Blanchett crushes all actresses as your choice to be the next to win a 3rd Academy Award [Poll Results]
Cate Blanchett has crushed all of the competition in our latest Oscar poll with 73% of all votes. We asked which of the 10 active two-time winning actresses would be next to win a third Academy Award. Blanchett was far ahead of Maggie Smith, who finished second place in our poll results featured below. Be watching for our similar male actor poll coming soon.

Only 20 women have ever won multiple Oscars in the acting categories. Katharine Hepburn is the all-time leader with four Academy Awards, all as Best Actress. Ingrid Bergman and Meryl Streep have each won three, with two in the lead category and one as supporting for both ladies. Tour our new photo gallery above of all 20 actresses.

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Of the 17 actresses who have won twice, Olivia de Havilland is long since retired. Bette Davis, Helen Hayes, Vivien Leigh, Luise Rainer,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars poll: Which actress will be the next to win a 3rd Academy Award?

  • Gold Derby
Oscars poll: Which actress will be the next to win a 3rd Academy Award?
Only 20 women have ever won multiple Oscars in the acting categories. Katharine Hepburn is the all-time leader with four Academy Awards, all as Best Actress. Ingrid Bergman and Meryl Streep have each won three, with two in the lead category and one as supporting for both ladies. Tour our new photo gallery above of all 20 actresses.

But which of the others is the most likely to take home a third and join Bergman and Streep at that level. Take our new poll below to let us know who you think will be next with this achievement.

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Of the 17 actresses who have won twice, Olivia de Havilland is long since retired. Bette Davis, Helen Hayes, Vivien Leigh, Luise Rainer, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelley Winters have all passed away.

Here are the other 10 people in our poll below:

Cate Blanchett won Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Klute’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, Roy Scheider, Robert Milli | Written by Andy Lewis, Dave Lewis | Directed by Alan J. Pakula

Released in 1971, Alan J. Pakula’s sophomore feature Klute is regarded as the first of his unofficial Paranoia Trilogy, which would go on to include The Parallax View and All the President’s Men. However, Klute is far less overtly political – and far more intimate – than those later pictures.

Donald Sutherland plays the titular John Klute, a private investigator who is employed to look into the disappearance of a man named Tom (Robert Milli). Apparently, shortly before his death, Tom was sending filthy letters to a New York call girl named Bree (Jane Fonda). So, John heads to NYC to interview Bree. Once there, a stuttering, sad and sensual relationship begins.

John’s task is to trace the points backwards from Bree’s encounter with a man who
See full article at Nerdly »

Jane Fonda and the Costumes of Klute (1971)

As a new feature for Clothes on Film, we will uploading regular videos (say every couple of weeks) to YouTube examining the costume design of new and classic movies, plus selected television and trailers. This is mainly because Clothes on Film’s creator and editor Christopher Laverty (waves) has been busy on other projects and has not had the opportunity to update the site as much as he’d like. Returning to more regular posting, it felt like a change was needed as there are already over 400 articles currently on here. Hence the idea of video. There will be some written articles added, but for the most part this site will be shifting over to video. It’ll be rough and ready to begin with so please bear with us!

This first video, timed to coincide with Criterion Collection’s new blu-ray release, analyses the costumes worn by Jane Fonda
See full article at Clothes on Film »

Jane Fonda on Her 'Sweet-Hearted' Little Brother Peter's Final Days: 'He Went Out Laughing'

  • PEOPLE.com
Jane Fonda on Her 'Sweet-Hearted' Little Brother Peter's Final Days: 'He Went Out Laughing'
Jane Fonda is mourning her brother Peter Fonda’s death — and celebrating his spirit.

Shortly after People confirmed that her little brother had died on Friday morning, the iconic actress, 81, spoke out about the tragedy and how she was coping with the loss.

Though Jane said that she was devastated by Peter’s passing, she also revealed that she had spent some alone time with him before his death and reassured everyone that her little brother “went out laughing.”

“I am very sad,” Jane said in a statement to People. “He was my sweet-hearted baby brother, the talker of the family.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Criterion Collection: Klute (1971) | Blu-ray Review

“I have no idea what I’m going to do,” and “I have no idea what’s going to happen,” are among some of the lines uttered by the lost souls in Alan J. Pakula’s famed sophomore film Klute, which nabbed Jane Fonda her first of two Best Actress Academy Awards. It’s a New York nightmare released in the heyday of the New American Cinema, a paranoid slow burn thriller about a prostitute trailed by a serial killer, and romanced by the titular private eye hired to find a missing businessman. Its narrative couldn’t be simpler, come to find, and isn’t so much surprising with what happens but rather who becomes its focus.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Blu-ray Review: Klute Channels an Era Ahead of its Time

I'd never seen Alan J. Pakula's 1971 film Klute before now. I had seen another of his films, All The President's Men, starring Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford and was quite impressed. Looking at his filmography, I've even more amazed to see that he also directed Sophie's Choice, and produced To Kill A Mockingbird. To start off, Criterion's new Blu-ray release (out now) of Pakula's Klute (he produced and directed) is one of a few collaborations with master cinematographer Gordon Willis, who shot The Godfather Trilogy, Annie HallAll The President's Men, and The Parallax View, among many other films. This piece of cinematic excellence wowed me, quite frankly. Klute is a "slow" film compared to today's standards, which I'm willing to bet was both suspenseful and filled with dread...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Paranoia Reigns Supreme in Three New Criterion Releases

Paranoia reigns supreme in three recent Blu-Rays from the Criterion Collection. Leading the charge is Alan Pakula’s 1971 neo-noir Klute, widely regarded as the first and most overlooked of the director’s 1970s “paranoid trilogy” which also includes The Parallax View and All the President’s Men. A phenomenally tense, haunting and deliberate detective thriller, Klute leverages two intense lead performances from Donald Sutherland and Jane Fonda cast as perfect foils: a stoic, repressed private dick visiting New York City in search of a missing friend, and an outspoken, libertine call girl and aspiring actress who may be connected to the case. Fonda’s performance was met with emphatic critical acclaim at the time, culminating in an Academy Award, and for good reason: her antiheroine Bree is one of the most multilayered and intriguing femme fatales in all of cinema, a child of the sexual revolution who is simultaneously empowered
See full article at The Film Stage »

New On Blu-ray: ‘Shazam!’, ‘Klute’, ‘Do the Right Thing’, ‘The Intruder’, ‘Moon’

New On Blu-ray: ‘Shazam!’, ‘Klute’, ‘Do the Right Thing’, ‘The Intruder’, ‘Moon’
It’s that time again: time to highlight some physical media! Our latest Blu-ray round-up includes a recent superhero movie, a classic neo-noir, a Spike Lee masterpiece, a trashy but fun thriller, and an indie sci-fi flick celebrating its 10th anniversary with a new 4K release. These are the new Blu-ray releases you should check out this […]

The post New On Blu-ray: ‘Shazam!’, ‘Klute’, ‘Do the Right Thing’, ‘The Intruder’, ‘Moon’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Klute

Klute

Blu ray

Criterion

1971/ 2.39:1/ 114 min.

Starring Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland

Cinematography by Gordon Willis

Directed by Alan J. Pakula

Jane Fonda plays Bree Daniels, the hooker with a heart of glass in 1971’s Klute. The lanky vamp in the shag cut and form-fitting mini-skirt is desired by many but they’ll have to pay a price – that includes John Klute, a small town detective who wants more from Bree than just sex.

Director Alan J. Pakula’s stylish murder mystery connects the dots between depression era potboilers, the doomed romanticism of 40’s noirs and in particular the European crime films that riled up 42nd street audiences in the late 60’s and early 70’s – macabrely glamorous entertainments featuring debonair degenerates like the man Klute is searching for.

Klute has left his tiny hometown of Tuscarora to find Tom Gruneman, a friend and erstwhile “family man” who’s gone missing in New York City.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

New on Blu-ray and DVD for July 15, 2019

With her Oscar-winning turn in Klute, Jane Fonda arrived full-fledged as a new kind of movie star. Bringing nervy audacity and counterculture style to the role of Bree Daniels—a call girl and aspiring actor who becomes the focal point of a missing-person investigation when detective John Klute (Donald Sutherland) turns up at her door—Fonda made the film her own, putting an independent woman and escort on-screen with a frankness that had not yet been attempted in Hollywood.

Suffused with paranoia by the conspiracy-thriller specialist Alan J. Pakula, and lensed by mas
See full article at QuietEarth »

Donald Sutherland movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Donald Sutherland movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Donald Sutherland celebrates his 84th birthday on July 17, 2019. The award-winning thespian has starred in dozens of titles throughout his career, showing no signs of slowing down with old age. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Despite decades of acclaimed work, the Canadian-born star has yet to earn an Oscar nomination, though he did receive an Honorary statuette for his body of work in 2017. The Golden Globes recognized him with nominations for “M*A*S*H” (Best Comedy Actor in 1970), “Ordinary People” (Best Drama Actor in 1980) and “Without Limits” (Best Supporting Actor in 1998), so it certainly wasn’t for lack of good options. Additionally, he reaped a joint BAFTA bid in 1973 for his performances in “Don’t Look Now” and “Steelyard Blues.” Since Sutherland continues to land juicy roles to this day, perhaps his overdue Oscar narrative could pay off sooner than we think.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Review: "Klute" (1971) Starring Jane Fonda And Donald Sutherland; Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Brian Greene

Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

“It’s easy to manipulate men.”

That’s a key line in Alan J. Pakula’s 1971 film Klute, which has just been released in a new Criterion Collection edition. The line is delivered by a New York City call girl named Bree Daniels, as portrayed by Jane Fonda, who won a Best Actress in a Leading Role Oscar for this performance.

“It’s easy to manipulate men” is a striking declaration, especially when it comes from the mouth of a paid sexual escort. But some context is necessary here, because when Daniels utters that line to her psychiatrist – in one of a few crucial scenes that take place in Daniels’s shrink’s office – she is actually talking about the one man in her life whom she’s not sure she can control. This is John Klute (played by Donald Sutherland
See full article at CinemaRetro »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed