Alias Smith and Jones (1971) - News Poster

(1971–1973)

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R.I.P. Glen Larson

Tributes have been flying back and forth this weekend in the wake of the death of legendary TV creator Glen A. Larson who passed away from esophageal cancer at the age of 77.

Larson was the man behind a dozen hit television series in the 1970s and 1980s including the original "Battlestar Galactica," "Knight Rider," "Magnum P.I.," "Manimal," "The Fall Guy," "Quincey M.E.," "Alias Smith And Jones" and "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century".

He also wrote the theme songs for both "Knight Rider" and "The Six Million Dollar Man," and won several Emmys for his writing work which included shows like "McCloud" and "The Fugitive".

Source: io9
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Legendary TV Producer Glen A. Larson Dead At 77

Legendary TV Producer Glen A. Larson Dead At 77
The iconic television writer, creator, and producer Glen A. Larson passed away Friday, November 14, at the age of 77.

Larson was perhaps best known for creating some of the most iconic TV shows of the 1970s and '80s including Alias Smith and Jones, McCloud, Buck Rogers In The 25th Century, B.J. And The Bear, Trauma Center, Quincy M.E., Manimal, The Fall Guy, and Magnum P.I..

However, two of Larson's most lasting creations are still cultural touchstones to this day. In 1982, Larson introduced Kitt, the artificially intelligent car, and David Hasselhoff's Michael Knight to American audiences with Knight Rider, and it quickly became one of the biggest TV hits of its day.

Photos: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

Four years prior, Larson created a show that would, much later, become a hugely celebrated franchise. In 1978, Larson brought the cult classic sci-fi series Battlestar Galactica to TVs across the country.

While not a huge
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Battlestar Galactica Creator Glen A. Larson Dies

  • Vulture
Battlestar Galactica Creator Glen A. Larson Dies
The television writer and producer Glen A. Larson, whose oeuvre includes hit television shows from Battlestar Galactica, Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Knight Rider, and a number of others died Friday night in Los Angeles, California. He had been battling esophageal cancer. He was 77.Larson's first writing credit was for The Fugitive, and he later worked his way up the ladder, creating his first show, Alias Smith and Jones in 1971. He later made Battlestar Galactica, which lasted for just a season in 1978-79, because of high production costs. The show is best known now for its beloved rebirth in the mid aughts on Syfy. His biggest hits would come in the '80s with the mustachioed Tom Selleck in Magnum P.I. and Knight Rider starring David Hasselhoff. He earned three Emmy nominations for McCloud and Quincy, M.E. When Larson was younger, he was part of a vocal quartet called
See full article at Vulture »

'Battlestar Galactica' Creator Glen A. Larson Dead at 77

'Battlestar Galactica' Creator Glen A. Larson Dead at 77
Glen A. Larson, the television writer-producer who created Battlestar Galactica, among many other hits series, died on Friday at the age of 77. Larson's son told The Hollywood Reporter that he died of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center.

Larson's incredibly fruitful television career came after a stint in the 1950s pop group the Four Preps. After working as a story editor and producer on It Takes a Thief, he created his first show with the western Alias Smith and Jones, followed by The Six Million Dollar Man. In 1976, Larson introduced Quincy,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

8 Ball-Busting Scenes That Leave All Men Crossing Their Legs

If there’s one thing all men can agree on, it’s that being hit in the balls hurts. A lot. We may not have a clue about the agony of childbirth, but when it comes to having your crown jewels impacted upon there’s no greater feeling to unify a gender.

Some sadistic directors are full aware of this. While common in slapstick – no matter how painful, there is something seriously funny about seeing a guy hit hard in the nards – the most grotesque, gasp-inducing moments tend to come in more straight faced pieces, using the tone to disturb us beyond the length of the the film.

There’s plenty of cases where horrific ball torture is merely anticipated – ‘Chopper, sick balls’ in Stand By Me and the laser scene from Goldfinger – and in some cases humour is found in no pain (Indy vs. the Nazi hulk in Raiders

Ooh, my head: is the old movie 'whack on the head' trick making a comeback?

For years, TV made me think you could knock someone out cold and they'd soon recover. Now the Dardenne brothers' new film, The Kid with a Bike, has revived that dramatic tic

Next week the Dardenne brothers, Jean-Pierre and Luc, are opening their latest film in the UK: Le Gamin au Vélo, or The Kid with a Bike. A young boy in care makes a desperate attempt to find his dad, and the beloved bike he is sure must still be in the father's possession. These film-makers, double Palme d'Or winners at Cannes for Rosetta (1999) and The Child (2005), have created some classic social realist dramas in the past, and The Kid with a Bike is a winningly forthright, heartfelt movie that I reviewed on its Cannes festival premiere last year and will return to again next Friday.

But here I feel I have to notice that once again, the Dardennes
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ooh, my head: is the old movie 'whack on the head' trick making a comeback?

For years, TV made me think you could knock someone out cold and they'd soon recover. Now the Dardenne brothers' new film, The Kid with a Bike, has revived that dramatic tic

Next week the Dardenne brothers, Jean-Pierre and Luc, are opening their latest film in the UK: Le Gamin au Vélo, or The Kid with a Bike. A young boy in care makes a desperate attempt to find his dad, and the beloved bike he is sure must still be in the father's possession. These film-makers, double Palme d'Or winners at Cannes for Rosetta (1999) and The Child (2005), have created some classic social realist dramas in the past, and The Kid with a Bike is a winningly forthright, heartfelt movie that I reviewed on its Cannes festival premiere last year and will return to again next Friday.

But here I feel I have to notice that once again, the Dardennes
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV and the Western

It’s hard to believe, but starting in 1947 (Howdy Doody), with very few exceptions, there has been at least one Western on TV every season. In 1984, the genre took the year off (probably due to Little House fatigue), and there was some downtime after Deadwood ended and before Justified premiered (2007-2009), but other than those four years, some form of Western, be it traditional, revisionist, steampunk, or sci-fi hybrid, has always graced our screens. Here is a brief rundown of the history and trends of the Western in American television.

In the 1950s and 60s, Westerns ruled the air. There were at least 98 distinct shows during the 50s and 89 in the 60s. In 1959, there were 26 Westerns during primetime alone, and keep in mind that these were the days of three-channel TV. Shows such as The Lone Ranger, Have Gun—Will Travel, and Maverick were huge hits and Gunsmoke and Bonanza premiered and became decade-spanning institutions.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Cannon for Cordoba DVD Review!

The Movie Pool goes in with guns blazing to review Cannon for Cordoba on DVD for the first time!

This DVD is offered as part of MGM's "Limited Edition Collection," which is available from select online retailers and manufactured only when the DVD is ordered. The DVD features a simple menu with no menu for chapters or scenes. Manufacture-On-Demand (Mod) DVDs are made to play in DVD playback units only and may not play in DVD recorders or PC drives. This DVD did not play in our laptop DVD drive but did play in our Toshiba DVD recorder.

DVD Specs

Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1  

Running Time: 104 minutes

Rating: PG-13

Audio: Dolby Digital 2.0

Subtitles: None  

Special Features: Theatrical trailer  

The Set-up

During the Mexican Revolution of 1912, a U.S. Army captain (George Peppard) is sent on a mission to destroy stolen American cannons and capture a rebel leader (Raf Vallone).

Written by:
See full article at Cinelinx »

Wilson All Set For Alias Smith & Jones Movie

  • WENN
Wilson All Set For Alias Smith & Jones Movie
Owen Wilson is reportedly heading back to the Wild West for a movie adaptation of cult TV series Alias Smith & Jones.

The Marley & Me star recently confirmed plans were afoot for the project, based on the hit 1970s show about a pair of outlaws.

Wilson says, "We're thinking about (doing) the Western Alias Smith and Jones.

The TV series featured Pete Duel as Hannibal Heyes (aka Joshua Smith) and Ben Murphy as Jed 'Kid' Curry (aka Thaddeus Jones) and ran for 50 episodes between 1971 and 1973.

See also

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