7.0/10
2,060
36 user 32 critic

The Landlord (1970)

PG | | Comedy, Drama, Romance | 20 May 1970 (USA)
At the age of twenty-nine, Elgar Enders "runs away" from home. This running away consists of buying a building in a black ghetto in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn. Initially his ... See full summary »

Director:

Hal Ashby

Writers:

Bill Gunn (screenplay), Kristin Hunter (novel)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Biography | Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

The early life of Woody Guthrie as a vagabond folk singer.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: David Carradine, Ronny Cox, Melinda Dillon
Shampoo (1975)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

Lovers undo a hairdresser from Beverly Hills around Election Eve in 1968.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, Goldie Hawn
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.7/10 X  

A high-spirited wife and her meekish husband hit the road to take back her kids from her previous marriage who live with her ex-inlaws.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Robert Blake, Barbara Harris, Collin Boone
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.2/10 X  

Two gamblers must leave New York City after one loses a lot of money. Doing what all gamblers in trouble would do, they hurry to the gambling capital Las Vegas to turn their luck around.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Jon Voight, Ann-Margret, Burt Young
Coming Home (1978)
Drama | Romance | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A woman whose husband is fighting in Vietnam falls in love with another man who suffered a paralyzing combat injury there.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, Bruce Dern
Hal (2018)
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Hal Ashby's obsessive genius led to an unprecedented string of Oscar®-winning classics, including Harold and Maude, Shampoo and Being There. But as contemporaries Coppola, Scorsese and ... See full summary »

Director: Amy Scott
Stars: Allison Anders, Judd Apatow, Rosanna Arquette
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

Two Navy men are ordered to bring a young offender to prison, but decide to show him one last good time along the way.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Jack Nicholson, Randy Quaid, Otis Young
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

The Rolling Stones' shows in Tempe, Arizona and East Rutherford, New Jersey during their 1981 US tour.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Two New York City longshoremen Axel Nordmann, an Army deserter and Tommy Tyler, an easy-going freight car loader whose growing friendship is threatened by Charles Malik, a notably repellent punk.

Director: Martin Ritt
Stars: John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier, Jack Warden
Comedy | Music | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.5/10 X  

A major league star who is on the verge of breaking a record, meets a singer and they get married, but they have different goals, so they separate, jeopardizing his opportunity in sports and the possibility of making up with his wife.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Michael O'Keefe, Rebecca De Mornay, Martin Ritt
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A black man and his school-teacher wife face discriminatory challenges in 1960s America.

Director: Michael Roemer
Stars: Ivan Dixon, Abbey Lincoln, Julius Harris
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

In 1940s Mississippi, two teenage boys and an elderly woman combine forces to prevent a miscarriage of justice and clear a black man of a murder charge.

Director: Clarence Brown
Stars: David Brian, Claude Jarman Jr., Juano Hernandez
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Beau Bridges ... Elgar
Lee Grant ... Mrs. Enders
Diana Sands ... Fanny
Pearl Bailey ... Marge
Walter Brooke ... Mr. Enders
Louis Gossett Jr. ... Copee (as Lou Gossett)
Marki Bey ... Lanie
Mel Stewart ... Professor Duboise (as Melvin Stewart)
Susan Anspach ... Susan Enders
Robert Klein ... Peter (as Bob Klein)
Will Mackenzie ... William Jr.
Gretchen Walther Gretchen Walther ... Doris
Doug Grant Doug Grant ... Walter Gee (as Douglas Grant)
Stanley Greene Stanley Greene ... Heywood
Oliver Clark ... Mr. Farcus
Edit

Storyline

At the age of twenty-nine, Elgar Enders "runs away" from home. This running away consists of buying a building in a black ghetto in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn. Initially his intention is to evict the black tenants and convert it into a posh flat. But Elgar is not one to be bound by yesterday's urges, and soon he has other thoughts on his mind. He's grown fond of the black tenants and particularly of Fanny, the wife of a black radical; he's maybe fallen in love with Lanie, a mixed race girl; he's lost interest in redecorating his home. Joyce, his mother has not relinquished this interest and in one of the film's most hilarious sequences gives her Master Charge card to Marge, a black tenant and appoints her decorator. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Watch the landlord get his.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 May 1970 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Landlord See more »

Edit

Box Office

Gross USA:

GBP957,758
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Hal Ashby: bearded hippie/groom in opening shot. See more »

Quotes

Elgar Winthrop Julius Enders: [being held at gunpoint by Marge] I am the new landlord. And you are disregarding your lease by practicing whatever you're practicing here with these, with these readings. I'll have you thrown out! So if you want to shoot, just go ahead and shoot. That'll be running an illegal business, nonpayment of rent... and manslaughter.
See more »

Connections

Features The Dating Game (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

Brand New Day
Lyrics and Music by Al Kooper
Sung by Al Kooper/The Staple Singers
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Culture Clash
23 April 2016 | by LechuguillaSee all my reviews

Our hero here is Elgar Winthrop Julius Enders (Beau Bridges), age 29, a White, rich, and very naïve man who, much to the disgust of his hateful bourgeoisie family, cheerily buys a rundown urban tenement building, filled with Black, poor, and very sophisticated adults and street-wise kids. Elgar thus sets himself up to be caught in the middle of an inevitable culture clash.

Director Hal Ashby creates a cinematic social commentary suited to the late 1960s and early 70s that is both comedic and thoughtful. Elgar's tenement dwellers wrestle with serious issues, like how to pay the rent. Elgar's snobbish mother worries about what Elgar wears to an elitist banquet. The plot doesn't "flow" in a traditional way; instead, it feels "jerky"; long scenes are followed by very short scenes, followed again by long scenes, and so on.

This change in rhythm, brought about by cross-cutting, amplifies ironic contrasts between these two social classes. The resulting editing is satisfying in that the comedy takes the edge off of the anger attendant to the more serious subtext. This film style works well until the final twenty minutes when the plot becomes too heavy handed and alarming. The bow and arrow scene in the middle is okay, but the fearful ax scene toward the end, sans humor, is not okay because it disrupts tonal balance.

Ashby also wanted the cinematography to be darker in the tenement scenes than in Elgar's aristocratic family segments. The result is cinematography so dark in ghetto interior scenes I could sometimes not distinguish people from furniture.

Casting and acting are quite acceptable. The standout performance is Diana Sands as Fanny, "Miss Sepia of 1957". And then there's wonderful Pearl Baily; I never realized she had been that young looking.

Social commentary films do not usually age well. And "The Landlord" certainly shows its age. I kept expecting a Simon and Garfunkel song at almost any moment.

Overall, this film is an enjoyable throwback to a bygone era of hippies, social consciousness and the generation gap. It has its flaws, but hippie Ashby gets his message across effectively, owing to an adroit mix of seriousness and humor.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 36 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed