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‘Seberg’ Review: Dir. Benedict Andrews (2019) [Lff]

Kristen Stewart leads an impressive cast in this true story of Jean Seberg, the hugely popular French New Wave actress and Hollywood star of films such as Paint Your Wagon and Airport. This film focusses on a specific part of Seberg’s life, the late 1960s where she was targeted by the American government as part of the FBI Cointelpro investigation.

Seberg review, image courtesy of Lff

Stewart headlines as Seberg, a hugely impressive turn who meet in the openings scenes just as she’s about to board a plane to Los Angeles for a big audition in a huge Hollywood movie. On the plane she meets activist Hakim Jamal (Anthony Mackie), who she immediately strikes up a relationship with, both in terms of his ideas and political beliefs, but also a romantic one. Jamal, however, we soon learn is being pursued by the FBI, his every move monitored and ever conversation recorded.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Film Review: The Captain (2019) by Andrew Lau

After “Operation Mekong” (2016), “Operation Red Sea” (2018), and “The Bravest” (2019), the Chinese cinema industry continues on with the series of epic tales about infallible servicemen. Andrew Lau’s “The Captain” is such a movie and it was inspired by a true story of Sichuan Airlines flight 3U8633 incident.

Cine Asia is releasing The Captain in UK & Roi cinemas from 4th October

The story takes place on the 14th of May, 2018. Captain Liu Chuanjian (Zhang Hanyu) prepares for a standard flight from Chongquin to Lhasa together with his two co-pilots, Xu Ruichen (Ou Hao) and Liang Peng (Du Jiang) as well as the flight attendants supervised by Bi Nan (Yuan Quan). Passengers board an Airbus A319 plane and everything seems to be in order. Forty minutes after take-off, on the altitude of 32,000 feet, the windshield blows out, sucking one of the co-pilots halfway out of the cockpit. The plane is now depressurized and with inoperative radio communication.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

It Came From The Tube: The Terror At 37,000 Feet (1973)

  • DailyDead
Since I’m on holidays, let’s look at a mode of transport I won’t be using this year: The Terror at 37,000 Feet (1973), which fits snugly in the ‘70s Disaster Sweepstakes, television division. A star-studded goof fest, it’s a fun destination vacation; or at the very least a pleasant diversion with a solid supernatural bent.

Disaster movies were all the rage; Airport (1970), The Poseidon Adventure (‘72), Earthquake (’74) and many more kept people lined up at the box office. But what about those staring intently at their little boxes at home? TV always reflected what was happening on the big screen, and Terror loads its craft with as many of the tropes as possible.

Originally broadcast on Tuesday, February 13th as part of The New CBS Tuesday Night Movies, Terror’s competition was movies from the other two networks; Tuesday’s were not exactly prime Prime Time.

So, open up
See full article at DailyDead »

The Seberg in "Seberg"

by Mark Brinkherhoff

Jean Seberg at only 17 years of age at a screen test for her film debutKristen Stewart as Jean Seberg in Seberg (2019)

Jean Seberg is a largely under-seen screen star among contemporary moviegoers and even cinéastes. I myself was unfamiliar with her work, save maybe Airport (1970), until a couple of years ago when Katrina Longworth, of the absolutely essential podcast, You Must Remember This, embarked on a nine-part journey that chronicled the parallel rise and, in terms of public favor, fall of Jane Fonda and Jean Seberg, circa the late 1950s into the ‘70s.

That Jane Fonda of all people purportedly envied Seberg, a friend and fellow American expat in ’60s France, for her edgy, avant-garde segues into French New Wave cinema is itself intriguing. But it’s the eclectic filmography of the beleaguered, ill-fated Seberg, who died tragically (at only 40) in the summer of 1979, that actually warrants our collective fascination,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Fault Lines: How "Earthquake" Broke The Disaster Movie Rules...And Failed.

  • CinemaRetro
While criticism of Earthquake usually concentrates on its flaky Sensurround effects, the film’s more important flaws lie in a confused approach to the genre and – especially – one character who really belongs in a different movie altogether, writes Barnaby Page.

Although it remains one of the best-known of the early-1970s all-star disaster extravaganzas, Earthquake (1974) was less successful commercially than Airport, The Towering Inferno or The Poseidon Adventure, and did not enjoy the critical acclaim of the latter two.

It probably suffered in the short term from being released only a month before Inferno, and in the longer term from its over-reliance on the Sensurround system; watched now, though, it is flawed largely through discontinuity of tone and the uneasy co-existence of both a strong human villain and a natural threat. Still, the film casts interesting light on the genre as a whole, sometimes complying with its standards and sometimes departing from them.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Actually perfect in every way: Mahershala Ali is the 7th actor with a 2-for-2 Oscar record

Actually perfect in every way: Mahershala Ali is the 7th actor with a 2-for-2 Oscar record
Mahershala Ali‘s second Oscar triumph Sunday night, for Best Supporting Actor in “Green Book,” puts him some exclusive company: He is the seventh performer to maintain a perfect 2-for-2 record.

Only six other actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

Since he won his first Best Supporting Actor Oscar two years ago for “Moonlight,” Ali has the second shortest gap between wins of this group,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Double Supporting Actress Oscar nominations for ‘The Favourite’: Will Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone vote-split?

Double Supporting Actress Oscar nominations for ‘The Favourite’: Will Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone vote-split?
While it is a common complaint that there aren’t enough good roles for women in films nowadays, “The Favourite” had the reverse problem in that it had almost too many good roles for actresses. The film offers Oscar caliber roles for three performers as it tells the tale of Queen Anne and two women who compete to be her “favourite.” The film inspired a lot of debate in the early days of the Oscar derby as to what categories the film would campaign its three actresses. Ultimately it was decided to place Olivia Colman in Best Actress and Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz in Best Supporting Actress. All three were nominated, thus placing Stone and Weisz in direct competition with each other. In taking a look back on Oscar history since the supporting categories were introduced at the 9th ceremony, are Stone and Weisz in danger of splitting the vote?
See full article at Gold Derby »

The 2-for-2 Oscar club could welcome Mahershala Ali, Rachel Weisz

The 2-for-2 Oscar club could welcome Mahershala Ali, Rachel Weisz
Mary Poppins is practically perfect in every way, but Mahershala Ali and Rachel Weisz could be actually perfect at the Oscars. The Oscar winners are on the verge of their second nominations, for “Green Book” and “The Favourite,” respectively, and could become the seventh and eighth actors to have a 2-for-2 record.

Only six actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

Two
See full article at Gold Derby »

December 11th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Silent Night, Deadly Night Part 2 and Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation Collector’s Editions, The Mangler

  • DailyDead
Ooh, it’s a great week for horror fans, as this Tuesday’s Blu-ray and DVD releases are a stellar bunch of films that will make for great additions to your personal collection of movies to enjoy from the comfort of your own home. Because it is the holiday season, I’m stoked to see Scream Factory show a little love to Silent Night, Deadly Night Part 2 with their Collector’s Edition Blu that hits shelves tomorrow, and for those of you who enjoy your horror movies with a side of sleaze, William Lustig’s Maniac has been given the 4K treatment by Blue Underground (and the film has never looked better).

The Mangler is also getting a brand new Blu-ray this week, and Scorpion Releasing is resurrecting Death Ship with their new Special Edition release as well. Vinegar Syndrome is keeping busy with both Ice Cream Man and Beware My Brethren,
See full article at DailyDead »

Emma Stone seeking to be 7th woman to win lead and supporting Oscars

Emma Stone seeking to be 7th woman to win lead and supporting Oscars
Emma Stone took home her first Oscar just two seasons ago, for Best Actress for “La La Land” (2016), and she might soon find herself not only with a bookend statuette but in a very exclusive group. Back in the running with a supporting campaign for “The Favourite,” Stone could become the seventh woman to win in lead and supporting.

The first six to accomplish this are:

1. Helen Hayes, Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1931/32) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

2. Ingrid Bergman, Best Actress for “Gaslight” (1944) and “Anastasia” (1956), and Best Supporting Actress for “Murder on the Orient Express” (1974)

3. Maggie Smith, Best Actress for “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie” (1969) and Best Supporting Actress for “California Suite” (1978)

4. Meryl Streep, Best Supporting Actress for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), and Best Actress for “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011)

5. Jessica Lange, Best Supporting Actress for “Tootsie” (1982) and Best Actress for “Blue Sky” (1994)

6. Cate Blanchett,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the early 1970s, including ‘Theme from ‘Shaft,’ ‘The Morning After’

Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the early 1970s, including ‘Theme from ‘Shaft,’ ‘The Morning After’
This article marks Part 11 of the Gold Derby series analyzing 84 years of Best Original Song at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at the timeless tunes recognized in this category, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the winners.

The 1970 Oscar nominees in Best Original Song were:

“Whistling Away the Dark” from “Darling Lili

“For All We Know” from “Lovers and Other Strangers

“‘Til Love Touches Your Life” from “Madron”

“Pieces of Dreams” from “Pieces of Dreams”

“Thank You Very Much” from “Scrooge

Won: “For All We Know” from “Lovers and Other Strangers

Should’ve won: “Whistling Away the Dark” from “Darling Lili

1970, the year voters embraced monumental pictures including “Patton” and “Mash” and far lesser efforts like “Airport” and “Love Story,” marked a comparably mixed bag in Best Original Song, sporting a truly grand Julie Andrews tune and respectable winner in “For All We Know,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mahershala Ali could become the 7th performer with a perfect 2-for-2 Oscar record

Mahershala Ali could become the 7th performer with a perfect 2-for-2 Oscar record
What’s harder than winning more than Oscar? Having a perfect record while doing so. But that’s what our combined odds are forecasting for Mahershala Ali (“Green Book”), who could join the exclusive 2-for-2 club if he prevails in Best Supporting Actor.

Only six actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

See Mahershala Ali knocks Timothee Chalamet out of top spot
See full article at Gold Derby »

Will Sissy Spacek (‘The Old Man and the Gun’) join elite group of actresses who have won both lead and supporting Oscars?

Will Sissy Spacek (‘The Old Man and the Gun’) join elite group of actresses who have won both lead and supporting Oscars?
It has been 17 years since Sissy Spacek was in the Oscar race, but with the release of “The Old Man and the Gun,” she might find herself once again walking the red carpet at the Academy Awards. Spacek has been getting strong reviews for the film, which leading actor Robert Redford has announced will be his last film performance. Rolling Stone poetically described Spacek’s work in the film: “There’s a look that crosses Spacek’s face as she falls in love with this man at a diner that’s the acting equivalent of the first time you tasted ice cream.”

This role could bring Spacek her first nomination as Best Supporting Actress following six nominations as Best Actress. Her first career bid came for her third film, the classic thriller “Carrie.” Spacek herself has described the Brian de Palma film as a “B-List” horror film, and Oscar was
See full article at Gold Derby »

All 15 Egot Winners, From Audrey Hepburn to John Legend (Photos)

  • The Wrap
All 15 Egot Winners, From Audrey Hepburn to John Legend (Photos)
Only a select number of entertainers have earned a competitive Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony to earn the coveted Egot distinction.

Richard Rodgers, composer (1902-1979)

Emmy: Outstanding Achievement in Original Music Composed, “Winston Churchill: The Valiant Years” (1962)

Grammy: Best Show Album, “The Sound of Music” (1960); Best Original Cast Show Album, “No Strings” (1962)

Oscar: Best Song, “It Might As Well Be Spring” from “State Fair” (1945)

Tony: three for “South Pacific” (1950); one each for “The King and I” (1952), “The Sound of Music” (1960) and “No Strings” (1962)

Helen Hayes, actress (1900 – 1993)

Emmy: Best Actress, “Schlitz Playhouse of Stars: Not a Chance” (1953)

Grammy: Best Spoken Word Recording, “Great American Documents” (1977)

Oscar: Best Actress, “The Sin of Madelon Claudet (1932); Best Supporting Actress, “Airport” (1970)

Tony: Best Actress in a Drama, “Happy Birthday” (1947); Best Actress in a Drama, “Time Remembered” (1958)

Rita Moreno (1931 -)

Emmy: Supporting Actress, Variety or Music, “The Muppet Show” (1977); Lead Actress for Single Appearance in a Comedy or Drama,
See full article at The Wrap »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Tatum O’Neal … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Tatum O’Neal … ? [Poll]
Much like the Best Actress category, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in the 1970s went to some true living legends. This decade included the youngest acting winner in history, the shortest performance to win an Oscar in history, and the start for a woman who would go on to become the all-time nomination leader. So which Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of the 1970s is your favorite? Look back on each and vote in our poll below.

Helen Hayes, “Airport” (1970)— Hayes won her second Oscar thanks to her role in “Airport” as Ada Quonsett, an older woman who makes a habit of being a stowaway on airplanes. She previously won an Oscar in Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1931). Hayes became the first woman to “Egot,” winning the grand slam of major awards: the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

SEEJessica Lange (‘Tootsie’) named top Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Universal Launches Music Restoration Program, New Soundtrack Imprint (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Universal has embarked on a long-range plan to preserve and restore its unreleased movie music and, starting next week, release some of these scores as limited-edition soundtrack albums.

The imprint will be called Universal Pictures Film Music Heritage Collection, and its first release, to be formally announced Tuesday, will be Michel Colombier’s music from the 1970 science-fiction film “Colossus: The Forbin Project.”

Following in August will be Henry Mancini’s score for the 1979 Peter Sellers remake of “The Prisoner of Zenda.” Both will be on the La-La Land label, which specializes in movie and TV soundtracks.

“We’re a century-old media company,” Mike Knobloch, Universal Pictures president of global film music and publishing, told Variety. “As much as we’re always looking forward, sometimes we have to look back, and recognize and value our history. Our catalog dates back to the beginning of cinema and the advent of sound. This
See full article at Variety »

Dick Delson, Longtime Hollywood Publicist, Dies at 81

  • Variety
Dick Delson, Longtime Hollywood Publicist, Dies at 81
Dick Delson, a well-known Hollywood publicist who worked with stars including Sylvester Stallone, Walter Matthau and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and on campaigns for films including “The Deerhunter” and “Jaws,” died Sunday in Yarmouth, Maine. He was 81.

His niece, Joanna Delson, said he died in his sleep at a longterm care facility.

Among his other clients were James Coburn, whose Oscar campaign for “Affliction” Delson designed, Robert Culp, Peter Graves, Lou Gossett, Jr., Marsha Mason, George Segal, Fred Dryer and Roddy McDowall, as well as authors Harold Robbins and Iris Rainer Dart.

Before forming his own firm in 1984, Delson was national director of publicity/promotion and television advertising at Walt Disney Productions, where he worked on campaigns for films including “Tron,” “Tex” and “Fantasia” as well as for “Splash” and “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.”

Prior to Disney, he served as national director of publicity for Filmways Pictures, promoting titles like “Dressed to Kill,
See full article at Variety »

Smackdown '70 Companion Podcast Pt 1: "Mash" and "Airport"

Nathaniel R welcomes Mark BlankenshipDan CallahanDenise Grayson, Lena Houst, and Bobby Rivers to talk 1970 at the movies

Pt 1 (35 minutes)

You've read our takes on the five Supporting Actress nominees of 1970, now let's talk the movies they're in. On the first half of the podcast we discuss "cheese with wings" Airport (1970) and what it wrought at the movies and the Oscars. Who was the Mvp among its actresses: Helen Hayes? Maureen Stapleton? Jean Seberg? Jacqueline Bisset? We then turn our attention to another smash hit M*A*S*H (1970) and both its modern filmmaking and its misogyny.

You can listen to the podcast here at the bottom of the post or download from iTunes. Continue the conversations in the comments, won't you? 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Truffaut's "Day For Night" 45Th Anniversary Screening, L.A. May 10

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

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Laemmle’s Royal Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 45th anniversary screening of Francois Truffaut’s 1973 film Day for Night. The 115-minute film, which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and known in its native France as La Nuit américaine (The American Night), stars Jacqueline Bisset, Valentina Cortese, Dani, Alexandra Stewart, Jean-Pierre Aumont, Jean Champion, Jean-Pierre Léaud and François Truffaut and has been referred to as the most beloved film ever made about filmmaking. It will be screened on Thursday, May 10, 2018 at 7:30 pm.

Please Note: At press time, Actress Jacqueline Bisset is scheduled to appear in person for a discussion about the film following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

Day For Night

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Coming Soon: Smackdown 1970 and Smackdown 1994

The next two regular Smackdowns were among the most requested years last time I shared the remaining years that haven't been done (among the years where it's still possible to find all five films -sigh). In both cases there are only 4 movies you need to watch to play along. I'm still on the hunt for panelists but in the meantime get to watching for the first time (or rewatching!)

Helen Hayes in "Airport"

May 6th "Supporting Actress Smackdown 1970"

Panelists: Tba; Nominees:

Karen Black, Five Easy Pieces Lee Grant, The Landlord Helen Hays, Airport Sally Kellerman, Mash Maureen Stapleton, Airport

Balloting is currently open and closes May 1st. Send your ballot to me with "1970" as subject line and a heart rating for each contender of 1 (awful) to 5 (perfection). Please only vote on the performances you've seen since the results are weighted accordingly so as not to punish the underseen or overvalue the widely seen.
See full article at FilmExperience »
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