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The Honey Pot (1967) Poster

(1967)

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (1)
The great Italian Cinematographer Gianni Di Venanzo died suddenly of hepatitis (aged only forty-five) during the making of this movie, with many weeks of the five-month shooting schedule to go before completion. His operator, Pasqualino De Santis, took over as Director of Photography, but refused credit in this capacity, although he would quickly go on to international renown with his work for Luchino Visconti, Franco Zeffirelli, Joseph Losey, and others.
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Anne Bancroft was originally cast as Merle McGill, but she turned it down for a stage role.
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This movie opened first in London, around two months before its American opening. At its premiere, it ran to two hours and thirty minutes, and almost all British reviews commented on its being overlong. By the time it went on general release in Britain, it had been cut by eighteen minutes, and this version is the one shown on television and released on DVD. Herschel Bernardi, prominently billed in the original advertising, had had his role deleted entirely, while Massimo Serato appears only for a second or two in Capucine's (Princess Dominique's) first scene. (There is a brief and now-inexplicable reference to the Bernardi character late in this movie.) Both actors are, however, featured in the cast-list at the end of the movie, although Serato's surname is mis-spelled as "Serrato".
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz's first script contained several novelties that never made it to the screen. Among them was a series of memos from a theater-chain owner (made to look as though they had been slipped in front of the projector) that commented on the action taking place. Also, there was to have been a running argument (resembling backstage squabbling) between a theater manager and the actor playing Cecil over such things as lines and cues.
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Three dream sequences were filmed (though ultimately scrapped) of the women fantasizing Cecil's (Sir Rex Harrison's) death and their inheritance.
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Afoldo Celi was dubbed by an well-known British voice actor.
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The ballet music to which Cecil Fox (Sir Rex Harrison) is seen dancing in his bedroom is the famous "Dance of the Hours", a short ballet piece, representing the third act finale of the opera "La Gioconda" composed by Amilcare Ponchielli. It was first performed in 1876. The choreography and the music represent the perennial struggle between light and darkness. They also symbolize the hours of the dawn, day, twilight, and night.
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(At around one hour and eighteen minutes) Sarah Watkins (Dame Maggie Smith) walks by a giant cast head in the garden of Cecil Fox (Sir Rex Harrison). Fourteen years later, Smith was the talking, giant, cast head which falls from the statue of the Goddess Thetis, mother of Calibos, in Clash of the Titans (1981).
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Sir Rex Harrison took dancing lessons for this movie. However, the more strenuous moves were performed by a double.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

After Cecil Fox (Sir Rex Harrison) dies, William McFly (Cliff Robertson) reveals that he was broke and that all of his furniture was rented from movie studios. He lifts a chair to show its owner's name under the seat: Cinecittà - where most of this movie was filmed.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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