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Barry Coe Dies: ‘Peyton Place’ & Mr. Goodwrench Actor Was 84

Barry Coe Dies: ‘Peyton Place’ & Mr. Goodwrench Actor Was 84
Barry Coe, who starred in the 1957 film Peyton Place, was considered as a possible series regular on Bonanza and became familiar to a new generation of TV viewers as the Mr. Goodwrench character in commercials that ran in the 1970s and ’80s, died July 16 in Palm Desert, CA. He was 84.

Coe’s death from the bone marrow disease myelodysplastic syndrome was announced by his family.

A resident of Sun Valley, ID, in later life, Coe began his Hollywood career with small, uncredited roles in such mid-1950s fare as How to Be Very, Very Popular, D-Day The Sixth of June and TV’s Cheyenne, moving on to credited roles in the 1956 Elvis Presley hit Love Me Tender and TV’s The 20th Century-Fox Hour.

His breakthrough came in 1957’s Peyton Place, in the role of Rodney Harrington. Although the character would be played by Ryan O’Neal in the subsequent TV adaptation,
See full article at Deadline »

Barry Coe, Actor in 'Peyton Place,' 'Follow the Sun' and 'Bonanza,' Dies at 84

Barry Coe, Actor in 'Peyton Place,' 'Follow the Sun' and 'Bonanza,' Dies at 84
Barry Coe, who starred in the Peyton Place movie and on the short-lived Hawaii-set ABC adventure series Follow the Sun, has died. He was 84.

A longtime resident of Sun Valley, Idaho, Coe died July 16 in Palm Desert after a battle with the bone marrow disease myelodysplastic syndrome, his family announced.

A Golden Globe recipient in 1960 for most promising male newcomer — shared with James Shigeta, Troy Donahue and George Hamilton — Coe also appeared with Elvis Presley in Love Me Tender (1956); with Sal Mineo, Terry Moore, Gary Crosby and Barbara Eden in A Private's Affair (1959); and ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

"The Young Philadelphians" 60th Anniversary Screening With Barbara Rush, August 7, Santa Monica

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

According to actor and film historian Douglas Dunning, his friend, legendary actress Barbara Rush, will be appearing in-person for a Q & A following a 60th anniversary screening of Vincent Sherman’s The Young Philadelphians. The 1959 film, which stars Paul Newman, Alexis Smith, Brian Keith, and Robert Vaughn among many others, will be screened at Laemmle’s Royal Theatre in Los Angeles on Wednesday, August 7th, 2019 at 7:00 pm. The film runs 136 minutes.

From the press release:

The Young Philadelphians

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

60th Anniversary Screening

Q & A with Actress Barbara Rush

Wednesday, August 7, at 7 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a rediscovery of a juicy melodrama from 1959: The Young Philadelphians, which boasted a vibrant cast headed by Paul Newman and our special guest, Barbara Rush. As Leonard Maltin wrote in his review,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

20th Century Fox And The Oscars: A Storied Studio And Its Legacy At The Academy Awards

  • Deadline
Now that one of Hollywood’s great studios, 20th Century Fox, has merged into another named Disney, let’s reflect, as a form of final tribute to a proud former stand-alone major, on one of Fox’s great legacies: its Oscars. Its track record with the Academy is far better than the studio that just swallowed it up.

Since 1937, when the fabled Pico Boulevard studio got its first-ever Best Picture nomination for In Old Chicago (a movie that also won Alice Brady only the second Best Supporting Actress Oscar ever given), there have been a remarkable 78 Best Picture nominations overall (by my count) and 12 wins beginning with the studio’s first Best Picture triumph in 1941 for How Green Was My Valley, a decision that still causes controversy even today since that venerable John Ford classic beat Orson WellesCitizen Kane, considered now by many to be the greatest movie of all time.
See full article at Deadline »

Joseph W. Sarno Retrospect Series 4

Let the debate about the incompatibility of film art and screen eroticism commence: Joe Sarno is back! His 1964 Sin in the Suburbs is still a slice of genuine Americana, considered total smut when first released but barely notable now except for the sordid believability of its subject matter. Is Sarno the Cassavetes of his own subgenre, the ’60s softcore sex soap opera? He certainly impresses as a man with a cinematic mission, following the beat of a different drummer.

Joseph W. Sarno Retrospect Series 4

Blu-ray

Sin in the Suburbs,

Confessions of a Young American Housewife,

+ Warm Nights and Hot Pleasures

Film Movement Classics

1964/1974/1964 / 1:78 widescreen / Sin B&W 90 min. Confessions Color 74 min. Warm B&W 70 min. / Street Date October 2, 2018 / 39.95

Written and Directed by Joseph W. Sarno

Trying to distinguish between legitimately artistic ‘erotic’ films and the mountains of porn sludge out there is likely a waste of time, what with arguments based on outside values,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Today in Soap Opera History (June 29)

1966: Dark Shadows' Victoria noticed her letter had moved.

1987: As the World Turns' Margo and Hal shared a kiss.

1994: Days of our Lives' Salem said goodbye to Dr. Tom Horton.

2012: The Young and the Restless' Paul shot his son, Ricky."All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."

Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1915: Future soap opera legend Ruth Warrick was born. Her daytime roles included Phoebe on All My Children,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

‘Rosemary’s Baby’ Gave Birth to a New Breed of Terror When It Premiered 50 Years Ago

‘Rosemary’s Baby’ Gave Birth to a New Breed of Terror When It Premiered 50 Years Ago
June 12 marks the 50th anniversary of “Rosemary’s Baby,” which still remains a gold standard for suspense movies. Though Ira Levin’s novel was a hit, the film adaptation “remained a big question mark until its initial screenings,” Variety wrote on May 29, 1968. The skepticism was because director Roman Polanski’s 1967 “The Fearless Vampire Killers” lost money, while star Mia Farrow was unproven at the box office. But Variety reviewer A.D. Murphy predicted it would be a success and praised the film’s “brilliant” work, above and below the line. With a budget of $3.2 million, the movie was one of the year’s biggest winners, bringing $12.3 million in rentals to Paramount. It was also subtly radical: While other 1960s shockers took place in isolated locations or creaky old homes, “Rosemary’s Baby” found horror in everyday urban settings. And after the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy that year,
See full article at Variety »

Memorial Day tribute: 2018 celebrity deaths include Harry Anderson, Steven Bochco, Milos Forman, John Mahoney

Memorial Day tribute: 2018 celebrity deaths include Harry Anderson, Steven Bochco, Milos Forman, John Mahoney
To honor Memorial Day with a tribute on Monday, Gold Derby takes a look back at celebrity and entertainment deaths so far in 2018. We are continuing to update our memoriam photo gallery above with major celebrity deaths from film, television, theater and music.

For this year, losses have included Oscar winners Milos Forman and Dorothy Malone, Emmy winners Steven Bochco, Reg E. Cathey and Olivia Cole, Emmy nominees Harry Anderson, John Mahoney and Jerry Van Dyke, Oscar-nominated composer Johann Johannsson, and legendary sports announcer Keith Jackson. Here is a brief summary of the careers of 14 people who have died in 2018:

See Over 100 video interviews with 2018 Emmy contenders

Actress Margot Kidder died at age 69 on May 13. She was best known for playing reporter Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in “Superman: The Movie” (1978). She won a Daytime Emmy in 2015 for the children’s TV show “R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Back to One, Episode Six: Lee Grant on Strasberg vs. Meisner, Being Directed by Mike Nichols and More

I finished Lee Grant’s incredible autobiography I Said Yes To Everything right before sitting down with her and that was a huge mistake, only because it was frustrating to have such a limited time with the legendary actress after reading her extraordinary story. Consider this episode a tiny drop in the ocean of this astounding life. She was nominated for an Oscar for her first screen role in William Wyler’s Detective Story and then was blacklisted by Huac for 12 long, painful years. She rebuilt her career with roles in Peyton Place, In The Heat Of The Night, and Shampoo […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Back to One, Episode Six: Lee Grant on Strasberg vs. Meisner, Being Directed by Mike Nichols and More

I finished Lee Grant’s incredible autobiography I Said Yes To Everything right before sitting down with her and that was a huge mistake, only because it was frustrating to have such a limited time with the legendary actress after reading her extraordinary story. Consider this episode a tiny drop in the ocean of this astounding life. She was nominated for an Oscar for her first screen role in William Wyler’s Detective Story and then was blacklisted by Huac for 12 long, painful years. She rebuilt her career with roles in Peyton Place, In The Heat Of The Night, and Shampoo […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Dorothy Malone Dead at 93

Actress Dorothy Malone, who starred in the primetime soap opera Peyton Place, died Friday in her hometown of Dallas. She was age 93.

Malone died in an assisted living center from natural causes days before her 94th birthday, said her daughter, Mimi Vanderstraaten.

After 11 years of mostly roles as loving sweethearts and wives, the brunette actress decided she needed to gamble on her career instead of playing it safe. She fired her agent, hired a publicist, dyed her hair blonde and sought a new image.

"I came up with a conviction that most of the winners in this business became stars overnight by playing shady dames with sex appeal," she recalled in 1967. She welcomed the offer for Written on the Wind, in which she played an alcoholic nymphomaniac who tries to steal Rock Hudson from his wife, Lauren Bacall.

"And I've been unfaithful or drunk or oversexed almost ever since— on the screen,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Lee Grant to Receive Split Screens Festival’s Inaugural Legacy Award

Lee Grant: splitscreensfestival.com

Actress, director, and author Lee Grant will be honored this year at the Split Screens Festival. According to an announcement from the television fest, Grant will receive its first Legacy Award, which pays tribute to “an individual whose career has had a lasting impact on television.” Split Screens will present the award to Grant on June 5, in partnership with AMC Networks.

One of Grant’s first films, 1951’s “Detective Story,” earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. But her success was short-lived. In 1952 the House Un-American Activities Committee — aka the Communist Witch Hunt Club — ordered Grant to testify against her husband, playwright Arnold Manoff. She refused and was blacklisted as a result.

Luckily that wasn’t the end of her career. She won an Emmy in 1966 and for her turn as Stella Chernak on nighttime soap “Peyton Place” and an Academy Award for her supporting role in “Shampoo.” After making her comeback as an actress, she shifted gears. She “channeled her political awareness into a career as a director of socially aware fiction and nonfiction films, tackling such hot-button subjects as workplace discrimination (‘A Matter of Sex’), transgender identity (‘What Sex Am I?’), poverty and Reaganomics (‘Down and Out in America’), and sexism in medical treatment (the TV movie ‘Nobody’s Child’)”, the Split Screens website details. She won a Director’s Guild Award for “Nobody’s Child,” becoming the first woman ever to receive the honor.

Lee Grant is the history of television,” Split Screens Creative Director and TV/film critic Matt Zoller Seitz told Women and Hollywood. “She’s one of the most important trailblazing women in both film and television, and the way she remade herself over and over again is inspiring.” “Lee has done it all,” he added.

Mulholland Drive,” “Dr. T & the Women,” and “Defending Your Life” are among Grant’s other screen credits. In 2014 she published her memoir, “I Said Yes to Everything.”

The Split Screens Festival is June 2–8, 2017 at the IFC Center in New York City. Head over to the fest’s website for more information.

Lee Grant to Receive Split Screens Festival’s Inaugural Legacy Award was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Nine Actors Who Reinvented Themselves and Revitalized Their Careers

  • Cinelinx
Some actors manage to catch lightning in a bottle twice. It’s impressive enough to find your niche in Hollywood’s A-list even once. Occasionally, an actor will reinvent him/herself and begin a new phase of their careers that will be even more successful than it was before. Here are nine actors who had a cinematic rebirth.

Liam Neeson- Neeson has had a long career, and the early part of it was in dramatic roles. An intense dramatic actor, he apeared in films like The Dead Pool, Dark Man, Schindler’s List, Rob Roy and Les Miserables. His career rebirth came after playing Qui-Gon Jinn in Star Wars-Episode one: The Phantom Menace. After that, he got more offers for actions parts and recreated himself as an action hero in films like Gangs of NY, Batman Begins, Taken, Clash of the Titans, the A-Team, Unknown, the Grey, Taken 2,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Jeffrey Hayden Dies: ‘Peyton Place’, ‘Donna Reed Show’ Director Was 90

Prolific TV and theater director Jeffrey Hayden, whose credits include Peyton Place and The Donna Reed Show, among many others, died December 24. Hayden passed away following a year-long battle with cancer at his Los Angeles home surrounded by his family, including his wife, Eva Marie Saint. He was 90. Hayden began his decades-long career at NBC New York after graduating from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He joined ABC Television as an associate director…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Michael Gleason Dies; ‘Remington Steele’ Co-Creator Was 78

Michael Gleason, the co-creator of Remington Steele and producer of such popular series as Diagnosis Murder and Rich Man Poor Man Book 2, died Friday at the age of 78. His death was confirmed on his Facebook page; no cause was listed. Gleason, a novelist as well as veteran producer, started as a writer for such 1960s series as Rawhide, Laramie, My Favorite Martian, The Big Valley and Peyton Place, continuing through the ’70s with Marcus Welby, M.D., Cannon, McCloud and Ric…
See full article at Deadline TV »

It Came From The Tube: Salem’S Lot (1979)

Stephen King adaptations are very hard to pull off successfully. For every Misery, there’s a Graveyard Shift; Carrie soars while Cujo stalls. The small screen has had it just as bad—the elephantine The Stand benefits from its four-night rollout, while no amount of time could save The Tommyknockers. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg—at last count, there were 91 King adaptations (I’ll need to double-check those figures) across all media. For this blurry-eyed cathode ray kid, however, nothing has yet to match the two-part graveyard dance known as Salem’s Lot (1979).

Originally airing on CBS on Saturday November 17th and 24th, Salem’s Lot was a huge success for the network; there was even talk of turning it into a weekly series. Alas, that never came to be. However, we were gifted with 183 minutes of measured, chilling suspense and terror helmed by none other
See full article at DailyDead »

Criterion Reflections – Rosemary’s Baby (1968) – #630

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

Roman Polanski made a massively successful transition to Hollywood filmmaking in this iconic horror-thriller classic of the psychologically disorienting variety. All the elements at play come together with the kind of perfect synchronization that signals the beginning of a new era in cinema: Mia Farrow’s star-making performance as a naive young wife living through a worst nightmare scenario, a flawless gradual atmospheric transition from seeming everyday normalcy into deeply disturbing paranoia, unsettling pivots between charming oddball humor and creeping, continually intensifying dread, and a perfectly timed interjection of quotidian satanism as practiced by one’s next door neighbors, when the taboos were still intact and capable of delivering maximum shock value. Rosemary’s Baby opened up new territory for mass audiences to experience intense levels of anxiety that didn’t depend on directors resorting to jump scenes, gratuitous violence,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Beauty Break: Ryan O'Neal

Baby Tatum and dad RyanToday is the 75th birthday of early 70s cinema's golden boy Ryan O'Neal. Happy Birthday Father o' Tatum. The picture to the left is just the cutest thing ever, don't you think? If not you don't cherish and worship and love to revisit Paper Moon (1973) in which the real life father & daughter stars played a fictional father and daughter, and played it to perfection in one of the greatest movies of that enormously fine cinematic decade.

But today, perhaps, younger readers don't really know Ryan O'Neal. In today's celebrity parlance I would suggest that he's something like a cross between Ryan Phillipe (all-american golden boy, super young dad as celebrity parenting goes, who remains more famous for his personal life than his career) and Leonardo DiCaprio (I shall explain). After coming to fame on television's Peyton Place (1964-1969) O'Neal was Oscar nominated for the #1 box office
See full article at FilmExperience »

Peyton Place: James Douglas Dies at 86

We are sorry to report actor James Douglas died on March 5, 2016. Perhaps best known for his roles on cancelled TV shows like the daytime soap operas As the World Turns (CBS), One Life to Life (ABC) and ABC's primetime soap, Peyton Place, Douglas had a long TV career.

His first appearance was on The Millionaire TV series, in 1957. Director James Sheldon, who died on Saturday, March 19, directed that series. Other TV appearances by Douglas include the soap operas Another World, The Doctors, and The Edge of Night, as well as primetime offerings like 12 O'Clock High, Ironside, and Spenser for Hire.

Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

James Douglas Dies: ‘Peyton Place’, ‘As The World Turns’ Actor Was 86

James Douglas, a ruggedly handsome, intense actor who starred in ABC’s racy primetime drama Peyton Place and CBS’ soap opera As The World Turns, has died. He was 86. His family confirmed his death on March 5 in Bethlehem Ct, where a wake in his honor was held on March 17 and 18. Douglas’ wife, Dawn, predeceased him. During the five seasons (1964-69) that Peyton Place set the bar for timely, often risqué TV drama, Douglas played lawyer Steven Cord on some 400 episodes of…
See full article at Deadline TV »
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