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CBS-Viacom Deal Reunites TV Studio and Paramount Legacy; Here’s What Might Come Next

  • Variety
As CBS and Viacom put the pieces back together again and rejoin after nearly 15 years apart, it also means that the former Paramount TV studio assets will be back in the same family as Paramount’s film studio. But it also raises new questions about the fate of the newer Paramount TV shingle.

When Sumner Redstone reversed course in 2005 and split CBS and Viacom back into two separate companies, Paramount Network Television moved to CBS, which merged it with CBS Productions. First renamed CBS Paramount TV, after three years it shed the “Paramount” name and became just CBS TV Studios — now one of the top suppliers of programming to network, cable and streaming services.

Viacom finally decided to get back into the TV studio business in 2013, launching a new Paramount TV studio — focused mostly on turning Paramount film titles into TV series. (It has since branched into original productions as well.
See full article at Variety »

Rip Torn Dead At Age 88

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Actor Rip Torn has died at age 88. He was a volatile figure in the entertainment industry, known for his sometimes bizarre behavior as well as his brilliant performances. A native Texan, he gravitated to  New York City in the 1950s where he studied under Lee Strasberg at the legendary Actors Studio. He was championed by director Elia Kazan, who gave Torn high profile roles in his stage and film productions. Torn gained major acclaim with a Tony-nominated performance on Broadway in "Sweet Bird of Youth", a role he would reprise in the 1963 film version. Torn's film career occasionally saw him attain leading man status but he remained a highly acclaimed supporting actor throughout his career. His feature films include "A Face in the Crowd", "Baby Doll", "The Cincinnati Kid", "Pork Chop Hill", "King of Kings", "Beach Red", "Coming Apart", "Tropic of Cancer", "Crazy Joe", "The Man Who Fell to Earth
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Cinema Retro Exclusive: Interview With L.Q. Jones

  • CinemaRetro
By Andrew J. Rausch

Lq Jones is a legend. He’s been in some of the greatest American films ever made, and his extensive filmography (consisting of well over 100 films) features a virtual Who’s Who of American American cinema. He made his film debut in the 1955 Raoul Walsh war picture Battle Cry, credited with his birth name Justus E. McQueen. The character he played was a young private named...Lq Jones. Soon, at the behest of the studio, the young actor changed his name to that of the character, and the rest is history.

Lq Jones isn’t a household name, and that’s a shame, because it deserves to be. Among knowledgeable cineastes he’s seen as a god among men, a gifted and accomplished performer. He’s one of those character actors people instantly recognize, as he’s been in films with the likes of Elvis Presley,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Amazon Prime Video schedule: Here’s what is coming and leaving in February 2019

Amazon Prime Video has confirmed that several original shows will be debuting new episodes on the streaming service in February, including the first season of “White Dragon”; a new adaptation of the Agatha Christie mystery “The ABC Murders,” with John Malkovich as the famed detective Hercule Poirot; and the documentary “Lorena,” which chronicles the life of Lorena Bobbitt, the wife who castrated her husband after years of abuse.

Likewise, there will be plenty of movies making their first appearances on Amazon Prime Video in February with the service showcasing films from every decade of the 20th century beginning with the 1910s and the Cecil B. DeMille silent classic “A Romance of the Redwoods.” More recent fare includes the Oscar-nominated romantic comedy “Four Weddings and a Funeral,”

Below is the full schedule of everything that is coming to Amazon Prime Video in February 2019. Unlike Netflix, Amazon does not disclose the shows
See full article at Gold Derby »

Burt Reynolds Remembered as Stars Mourn the Loss of a Hollywood Legend

  • MovieWeb
Burt Reynolds Remembered as Stars Mourn the Loss of a Hollywood Legend
Celebrities are posting on social media to pay their respects to the late great Burt Reynolds, who passed away earlier today at the age of 82. Reynolds, known for his work in films such as Boogie Nights, Deliverance, and Smokey and the Bandit, is being celebrated on social media by thousands of fans, many referring to the late actor as a "trailblazer." Arnold Schwarzenegger, Reba McEntire, Kevin Smith, Elijah Wood, and more have shared their thoughts on Reynolds.

Arnold Schwarzenegger called Burt Reynolds a "hero" of his and noted that it was his inspiration that led him to go from being an athlete to one of the world's highest paid actors. Schwarzenegger also said that Reynolds had a great sense of humor, which has been echoed by nearly everybody that ever worked with him. Reba McEntire, who worked with Reynolds in the made-for-tv movie The Man From Left Field, also mourned the actor.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Burt Reynolds Remembered as Stars Mourn the Loss of a Hollywood Legend

  • MovieWeb
Burt Reynolds Remembered as Stars Mourn the Loss of a Hollywood Legend
Celebrities are posting on social media to pay their respects to the late great Burt Reynolds, who passed away earlier today at the age of 82. Reynolds, known for his work in films such as Boogie Nights, Deliverance, and Smokey and the Bandit, is being celebrated on social media by thousands of fans, many referring to the late actor as a "trailblazer." Arnold Schwarzenegger, Reba McEntire, Kevin Smith, Elijah Wood, and more have shared their thoughts on Reynolds.

Arnold Schwarzenegger called Burt Reynolds a "hero" of his and noted that it was his inspiration that led him to go from being an athlete to one of the world's highest paid actors. Schwarzenegger also said that Reynolds had a great sense of humor, which has been echoed by nearly everybody that ever worked with him. Reba McEntire, who worked with Reynolds in the made-for-tv movie The Man From Left Field, also mourned the actor.
See full article at MovieWeb »

William Phipps, Sci Fi Actor and Original Voice of Prince Charming, Dies at 96

  • Variety
William Phipps, Sci Fi Actor and Original Voice of Prince Charming, Dies at 96
Character actor William Phipps, who starred in sci fi films of the 1950s and voiced Prince Charming in 1950’s “Cinderella,” died Friday, June 1 at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 96.

Phipps’ friend and entertainment industry author Tom Weaver announced the news, adding that Phipps had been battling lung cancer, which was complicated by pneumonia.

Phipps was born in Vincennes, Ind., on Feb. 4, 1922. In 1939, he enrolled at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Ill., where he studied accounting and planned to pursue it as a career while continuing what was then an acting hobby on the side.

In 1941, Phipps decided to forgo his Eiu studies and moved to California to pursue his acting dream. He later enlisted in the Navy after his brother Jack was shot down over the South Pacific, serving as a radioman aboard six ships between 1942 and 1945. After his discharge, he returned to Hollywood and used the G.
See full article at Variety »

William Phipps Dies: Voice Of Prince Charming In ‘Cinderella’ Was 96

William Phipps Dies: Voice Of Prince Charming In ‘Cinderella’ Was 96
William Phipps, the voice of Prince Charming in the animated Disney film Cinderella and a prolific actor who appeared in more than 200 film and television productions, has died. Phipps passed Friday at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica at age 96 from lung cancer complications, according to his friend, author Tom Weaver.

Phipps had an interesting career in film, debuting in the Oscar-nominated Crossfire, which was a Best Picture candidate that year. But he was best known for his many roles in 1950s science fiction films, where he was one of the genre’s main players.

Among his appearances were the films Five, The War of the Worlds, Invaders From Mars, Cat Women of the Moon, and The Snow Creature.

Phipps voice-over gig as Prince Charming was a direct hire by Walt Disney himself. It brought Phipps a whopping $100 for an afternoon’s work. He later made a live appearance as
See full article at Deadline »

Global Road Snags Spec Script ‘Rawhide Down’, Real-Time Chronicle Of Day Ronald Reagan Was Shot

  • Deadline
Exclusive: Global Road Entertainment has closed a deal to acquire Rawhide Down, a thriller spec script from scribe Alex Cramer that details in real time the day of President Ronald Reagan’s assassination attempt outside the Washington Hilton on March 30, 1981. We’re hearing that Global Road took the spec off the table a mid six-figure deal with Verve.

Mark Johnson and his Gran Via Productions are aboard to produce along with his exec Tom Williams, who brought the project into the company. Lynn Harris, Global Road’s President of Worldwide Production, will oversee.

The script is a true story that chronicles the day of the attempted assassination of Reagan in real time, told from multiple points of view: the Secret Service agents who tried to protect him, the officers investigating the shooter John Hinckley, and Cabinet members engaged in a power struggle as they awaited Reagan’s fate. (“Rawhide” was
See full article at Deadline »

A Fistful of Dollars

Sergio Leone’s breakthrough international sensation has returned, in a 4k restoration from Italy that’s bound to continue the controversy over odd choices of color. In every other aspect this umpteenth edition of the first murderous adventure of The Man With No Name is the best yet, with a clean image and good new extras.

A Fistful of Dollars

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1964 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 99 min. / Per un pugno di dollari; Fistful of Dollars / Street Date May 22, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Marianne Koch, Gian Maria Volontè, Wolfgang Lukschy, Seighardt Rupp, Joe Egger, Aldo Sambrell, Mario Brega.

Cinematography: Massimo Dallamano

Art Direction: Carlo Simi

Original Music: Ennio Morricone

Written by A. Bonzzoni, Jaime Comas Gil, Victor Andrés Catena, Sergio Leone

Produced by Arrigo Colombo, Giorgio Papi

Directed by Sergio Leone (Bob Robertson)

This is a long-awaited title, not because there aren’t umpteen previous versions out there,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

A Fistful of Dollars review – punk-rock western as fabulous as ever

The film that made Clint Eastwood a star and legend has a cult, comic-book intensity

Two fistfuls in fact: two $500 payments – a gigantic amount – which the Man With No Name accepts casually from either side of a bloody feud in the sunbaked Mexican town of San Miguel. He has blown in like a strange force of nature, with a coolly amoral plan to use their mutual hate to his own gunslinging advantage. Striding towards a gunfight, he tells the coffin-maker in advance how many to knock up.

This is the 1964 movie, now on rerelease, which created the revolutionary new genre of the Spaghetti Western, an Italian coproduction shot in Spain and directed with inspirational pulp passion by Sergio Leone –drawing on Kurosawa. And it made a star and a legend of Clint Eastwood. He had been the impetuous young Rowdy Yates on TV’s Rawhide, an open-faced boy with a pleasant singing voice.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Video Essay. Clint Eastwood's House of Horrors

  • MUBI
There’s a trail of blood and tears across the path of the Clint Eastwood persona. The career of the American movie star/director has been shaped by violence, since his days as a TV star in Rawhide (1959-1965) until his most recent directorial effort, The 15:17 to Paris (2018). Whether directing or directed, the sound of swinging saloon doors and jingling boot spores, more often than not precede gunshots, screams, bodies dropping, cries for help or cries for mourning.I started exploring the relationship of Clint Eastwood with violence in his 1992 masterpiece Unforgiven. It culminated in a video essay that found merit in his depiction of the atrocities on screen, but casted doubts on the its effectiveness. The protagonist, William Munny (Clint Eastwood), is haunted by the evil past he downplays. In a feverish dream, Munny sees the faces of his death wife, as well as his fallen victims, with
See full article at MUBI »

Blazing Saddles: An Old Western About Living in America Today

David Crow Feb 7, 2019

Mel BrooksBlazing Saddles is as timely today as it was in 1974 because it is about America’s past, present, and future.

In September 2017, a filmmaker and statesman for Hollywood days gone by named Mel Brooks gave a grim prognosis for our culture: We’d never make Blazing Saddles today. While he thinks some of his masterpieces of yore like Young Frankenstein could still exist in a modern context, Blazing Saddles would simply ruffle too many feathers.

“Never Blazing Saddles,” Brooks told BBC Radio 4, “because we have become stupidly politically correct, which is the death of comedy.” This is of course an oversimplification of the changing attitudes in our society, yet it rings with an unshakable truth. “They,” being Hollywood studios and the plethora of talent who frequent said distributors, would not touch Blazing Saddles in 2019. Which is a doggone shame since Blazing Saddles is just
See full article at Den of Geek »

10 Things About Back to the Future 3 You Never Knew

10 Things About Back to the Future 3 You Never Knew
Michael J. Fox suggested it would be fun to visit the Old West and the final installment in the Back to the Future trilogy was born. It's Back to the Future Part III, the movie that gave us a "Mad Dog" and a happy ending for Dr. Emmet Brown. Today, we look at 10 things you missed in Back to the Future Part III.

The Paradox script.

Despite the cliffhanger ending, there were originally no real plans for a Back to the Future sequel. However, once the studio became dead set on making one, director Robert Zemeckis and co-creator Bob Gale agreed to come back to make it. Conceived as a single sequel, a script called Paradox contained elements that were eventually split into II and III. Paradox remained the working title for the sequel shoots and parts of that script were used in the novelizations of the two movies.

Marty's bail.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Dashes, commas, and judgmental twitchers | Brief letters

Harry Dean Stanton | Boris Johnson | Dancing about architecture | Fatberg | Ornithology of meetings | Ambridge antidote

Your obituary for Harry Dean Stanton (18 September) mispunctuates the title of the TV series Have Gun – Will Travel by substituting a comma for the dash. This had a curious effect on the list of TV horse operas Stanton acted in: “Laramie, The Gun, Have Gun, Will Travel, Bonanza and Rawhide.” Even the Oxford comma, which coincidentally played a part in Sunday’s episode of Strike, can’t come to our rescue with that one, though it could have helped with Bonanza and Rawhide.

Hugh Darwen

Warwick

Boris Johnson must know that birds do not sing in the nest (Report, 20 September). It is a place of secrecy and security. It is the immature that call out, eager to be fed. This is especially true if an over-sized cuckoo is among them, ensuring that they are ejected and crash to the ground below.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film News: Character Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

Los Angeles – He was often categorized as the ultimate male character actor, but Harry Dean Stanton stood out on his own, with a persona that added immediate recognition in any supporting performance, and was unforgettable when he stepped into a lead role. Stanton died on September 15, 2017, at age 91.

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made his mark over a 60 year career, and appeared in character roles in notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017).

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Kentucky, and was a World War II veteran in the Navy,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Harry Dean Stanton Dead at 91

Harry Dean Stanton Dead at 91
Veteran actor Harry Dean Stanton, whose TV roles included HBO’s Big Love and Showtime’s Twin Peaks revival, has died at the age of 91.

Stanton passed away of natural causes in Los Angeles on Friday, according to our sister site Variety. A familiar face to movie fans, Stanton crafted a Hollywood career that spanned six decades with memorable roles in films like the Molly Ringwald teen drama Pretty in Pink (as Andie’s dad Jack), Repo Man, Cool Hand Luke, Escape From New York, Alien and The Godfather Part II. But he made his presence felt on the small screen as well.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Deathstroke Returns, Akira Kurosawa, Zatoichi, And The Man With No Name -- The Lrm Weekend

By David Kozlowski | 28 July 2017

Welcome to Issue #6 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Previous Issues: 7.21.17 | 7.14.17 | 7.7.17 | 6.30.17 | 6.23.17

Hey Lrm Weekenders, we survived San Diego Comic-Con 2017 -- did you have a favorite moment? Thor: Ragnarok's latest trailer was a big hit at Lrm (Hulk speaks!). As July comes to a close, we're ramping up for the big movies and TV shows of the late summer through the holiday season.

This week our emphasis is on Akira Kurosawa, the legendary Japanese filmmaker who's works have inspired generations of directors, screenwriters, and actors. Kurosawa's films have been adpapted and remade dozens of times, and we hope that this week's column gives you
See full article at LRM Online »

Tom Hanks Found Clint Eastwood ‘Intimidating as Hell’ and Says He ‘Treats His Actors Like Horses’

  • Indiewire
Tom Hanks Found Clint Eastwood ‘Intimidating as Hell’ and Says He ‘Treats His Actors Like Horses’
Tom Hanks has had a pretty busy year, starring in three different films, hosting “Saturday Night Live” and was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Hanks received the most acclaim for his performance as Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger in the Clint Eastwood film “Sully,” which garnered critical and commercial acclaim. Hanks recently appeared on The Graham Norton Show and discussed working with the veteran director and his intimidating style.

Read More: ‘Sully’ Review: Tom Hanks Is a Hero In Clint Eastwood’s Drama, But the Crash Is the Real Star of the Show

“He treats his actors like horses,” says Hanks, “because when he did the 60s series ‘Rawhide,’ the director would shout ‘Action!’ and all the horses bolted. So when he’s in charge, he says in a really quiet soft voice, ‘All right, go ahead,’ and instead of shouting ‘Cut!’ he says ‘That’s enough of that.
See full article at Indiewire »

Michael Gleason Dies; ‘Remington Steele’ Co-Creator Was 78

Michael Gleason, the co-creator of Remington Steele and producer of such popular series as Diagnosis Murder and Rich Man Poor Man Book 2, died Friday at the age of 78. His death was confirmed on his Facebook page; no cause was listed. Gleason, a novelist as well as veteran producer, started as a writer for such 1960s series as Rawhide, Laramie, My Favorite Martian, The Big Valley and Peyton Place, continuing through the ’70s with Marcus Welby, M.D., Cannon, McCloud and Ric…
See full article at Deadline TV »
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