Sweet Smell of Success (1957) - News Poster

News

‘Motherless Brooklyn’: Ed Norton Plays a Minor-League Gumshoe, Scores a Major-League Triumph

‘Motherless Brooklyn’: Ed Norton Plays a Minor-League Gumshoe, Scores a Major-League Triumph
For nearly two decades, Edward Norton has been trying to realize his passion project — a film version of Jonathan Lethem’s landmark 1999 novel Motherless Brooklyn. Now the film is here, sporting a few signs of artistic struggle, but nonetheless an ardent and ambitious triumph for writer-producer-director-star Norton. You might think multi-hyphenate Norton would err on the side of hat-in-hand faithfulness in adapting Lethem’s bestseller about an unlikely New York private detective with Tourette syndrome. Not the case. Norton has moved the novel’s 1990s setting backwards to 1957 (yup, the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Toronto Correspondences #10: Get That Money

  • MUBI
The Notebook is covering Tiff with an on-going correspondence between critics Fernando F. Croce, Kelley Dong, and editor Daniel Kasman.Uncut GemsDear Kelley and Fern,When one is in the thick of a film festival, surrounded on all sides by movie after movie after movie, the caffeine jolt of coffee may not be enough to keep up your energy; you may need a film that throttles you. If you want to be grabbed by the throat, then I’ve got just the movie for you: Josh and Benny Safdie's Uncut Gems. Like the brothers’ last two features, Heaven Knows What (2014) and Good Time (2017), it’s a showboating immersion into a gritty but resiliently existent side of New York that is nowadays rarely set to film. And like Good Time, their collision of Robert Pattinson with a borough-based B-film, Uncut Gems is driven by the monomania of its protagonist, Harold Ratner,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Loro’ Film Review: Paolo Sorrentino Spins a Gloriously Messy Yarn About Berlusconi

  • The Wrap
‘Loro’ Film Review: Paolo Sorrentino Spins a Gloriously Messy Yarn About Berlusconi
Loro” is the definitive Paolo Sorrentino film to date. It’s brash, stylish, and silly. It oscillates back and forth between horny and human, profound and misguided. It’s a glorious mess. That it exists in the #MeToo era is a miracle. That it manages to evolve beyond a dick-swinging affair is even more miraculous.

In the vein of “The Great Beauty,” “Youth” and “The Young Pope,” the film is sprawling and idiosyncratic. This time Sorrentino centers his story on Silvio Berlusconi, the infamous medial mogul and former prime minister of Italy. But this is not your standard cradle-to-grave biopic.

The film toggles back and forth between Silvio and Sergio, a youthful businessman determined to impress Silvio. Sergio works primarily as a glorified pimp, trafficking escorts to bribe politicians for permits and favors. When he’s not knee-deep in a line of cocaine or anonymous women, he has ambition. The
See full article at The Wrap »

John Lithgow Joins Jeff Bridges in FX Pilot ‘Old Man,’ Jon Watts to Direct

  • Variety
John Lithgow Joins Jeff Bridges in FX Pilot ‘Old Man,’ Jon Watts to Direct
John Lithgow has joined the cast of the upcoming FX drama pilot “Old Man” alongside previously announced lead Jeff Bridges, Variety has learned. In addition, “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Spider-Man: Far from Home” director Jon Watts has come onboard to direct the pilot and executive produce the series.

Based on the bestselling novel of the same name by Thomas Perry, the series centers on Dan Chase (Bridges), who absconded from the CIA decades ago and has been living off the grid since. When an assassin arrives and tries to take Chase out, the old operative learns that to ensure his future he now must reconcile his past.

Lithgow will play Harold Harper. Described as intelligent and tough with deep reservoirs of compassion and ruthlessness, Harper is called back to service by the FBI after suffering a terrible personal loss. He has a complicated past with rogue fugitive Chase, which makes him
See full article at Variety »

NYC Weekend Watch: Outsider Visions of America, Koker Trilogy, ‘Joan the Maid’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

“Another Country: Outsider Visions of America” offers films by Demy, Resnais, Antonioni, Varda and more.

IFC Center

The rather staggering Abbas Kiarostami retrospective continues, with screenings of the Koker trilogy and more.



Quad Cinema

Jacques Rivette’s masterpiece Joan the Maid has begun screening in a fantastic-looking 4K restoration.

Metrograph

Written by Paul and Leonard Schrader,
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: Machiko Kyō, Abbas Kiarostami, Godzilla & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Films by Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, and Naruse kick off a retrospective of Japanese actress Machiko Kyō.

The Pasolini retrospective continues.

Streetwise and its follow-up, Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell, begin a run.

The restoration of A Bigger Splash continues screening, while the ’90s indie film Chalk has been restored.

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
See full article at The Film Stage »

Body Politics: Burt Lancaster and "The Swimmer"

Burt Lancaster in Frank and Eleanor Perry's The Swimmer (1968), based upon the John Cheever short story. Courtesy of Film Forum.For decades, film critics and academics interested in the classical Hollywood cinema have been dutifully studying the canonized big stars—Cary Grant, Garbo, the Hepburns, Bogart and Bacall, Dietrich and Crawford and Monroe—while downplaying one of the most highly varied and fascinating careers of any studio actor: Burt Lancaster. Now, New York’s Film Forum is giving us a great excuse to revisit this actor’s towering body of work—emphasis on “body.” From big-name classics like Louis Malle’s Atlantic City (1980) and John Frankenheimer’s Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) to little-known masterpieces like Carol Reed’s Trapeze (1956) and Luchino Visconti’s late decadent chamber drama Conversation Piece (1974), a meaty, healthy range of Burt is on display for the next four weeks, between July 19 to August 15.Serious film talk
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: Burt Lancaster in Posters

Above: Italian 4-fogli for Birdman of Alcatraz. Artist: Renato Casaro.Starting today with a week-long run of Robert Siodmak’s The Killers, New York’s Film Forum is hosting a 4-week, 37-film retrospective of one of the great he-men of Hollywood. With his square jaw, gymnast’s physique, and megawatt grin, Burt Lancaster (1913–1994) must have been a boon to movie poster artists and over the years he was drawn or painted by many great affichistes. I could have curated a post on just the Italian renditions of Lancaster alone: over the years he was painted by Ercole Brini, Anselmo Ballester, Luigi Martinati, Renato Casaro, Averardo Ciriello, and many more. To mark the retrospective I have selected 50 of my favorite illustrated images of the indelible star, from his brooding film noir youth (though he was actually 33 when he made his debut in The Killers), through his serious thespian mid-period to his
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: 21st-Century Debuts, Barbara Hammer, Burt Lancaster & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

A retrospective of 21st-century debuts is underway, with two-for-one packages doubling some of today’s best working filmmakers.

A free screening of Martin Scorsese’s After Hours is held at Governor’s Island tonight.

A Bigger Splash has screenings.

Museum of the Moving Image

The expressively named “Barbara Hammer, Superdyke” looks
See full article at The Film Stage »

Brian d’Arcy James Does It All, from Tony-Winner ‘The Ferryman’ to ‘Dark Phoenix’ and ‘West Side Story’

Brian d’Arcy James Does It All, from Tony-Winner ‘The Ferryman’ to ‘Dark Phoenix’ and ‘West Side Story’
At 50, Brian D’Arcy James has parlayed his theater stardom — he boasts three Tony nominations, for “Sweet Smell of Success,” “Shrek the Musical,” and “Something Rotten” originated King George III in “Hamilton,” and currently stars in Tony-winning drama “The Ferryman” — into frequent supporting roles in film and television. He popped up as Debra Messing’s husband in NBC showbiz series “Smash,” as the parent of a troubled teenager in “13 Reasons Why,” won the ensemble SAG award in Oscar-winner “Spotlight,” cheated at poker in Aaron Sorkin’s “Molly’s Game,” tested airplanes in “First Man,” plays the U.S. president in current “X-Men: Dark Phoenix,” Melissa McCarthy’s criminal husband in “The Kitchen,” a Silicon Valley player in Alex Garland’s FX series “Devs,” and is prepping Officer Krupke for Steven Spielberg’s revamp of Stephen Sondheim and Jerome Robbins’ “West Side Story.”

In short, James has a wide range
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Brian d’Arcy James Does It All, from Tony-Winner ‘The Ferryman’ to ‘Dark Phoenix’ and ‘West Side Story’

Brian d’Arcy James Does It All, from Tony-Winner ‘The Ferryman’ to ‘Dark Phoenix’ and ‘West Side Story’
At 50, Brian D’Arcy James has parlayed his theater stardom — he boasts three Tony nominations, for “Sweet Smell of Success,” “Shrek the Musical,” and “Something Rotten” originated King George III in “Hamilton,” and currently stars in Tony-winning drama “The Ferryman” — into frequent supporting roles in film and television. He popped up as Debra Messing’s husband in NBC showbiz series “Smash,” as the parent of a troubled teenager in “13 Reasons Why,” won the ensemble SAG award in Oscar-winner “Spotlight,” cheated at poker in Aaron Sorkin’s “Molly’s Game,” tested airplanes in “First Man,” plays the U.S. president in current “X-Men: Dark Phoenix,” Melissa McCarthy’s criminal husband in “The Kitchen,” a Silicon Valley player in Alex Garland’s FX series “Devs,” and is prepping Officer Krupke for Steven Spielberg’s revamp of Stephen Sondheim and Jerome Robbins’ “West Side Story.”

In short, James has a wide range
See full article at Indiewire »

Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Sweet Smell of Success,’ ‘Some Like It Hot,’ ‘Spartacus’

  • Gold Derby
Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Sweet Smell of Success,’ ‘Some Like It Hot,’ ‘Spartacus’
Tony Curtis would’ve celebrated his 94th birthday on June 3, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer starred in dozens of movies throughout his career, becoming famous as the charismatic leading man of romantic comedies, action films, and prestige dramas. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1925 in The Bronx, New York, Curtis got his start in movies thanks mainly to his good looks. He first gained attention as a serious actor thanks to Alexander Mackendrick‘s searing drama “Sweet Smell of Success” (1957), in which he played an unscrupulous publicist who agrees to do the bidding of an amoral Broadway critic (Burt Lancaster). The film brought him a BAFTA nomination as Best Actor.

SEEBurt Lancaster movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

He earned his one and only Oscar bid the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Tony Curtis would’ve celebrated his 94th birthday on June 3, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer starred in dozens of movies throughout his career, becoming famous as the charismatic leading man of romantic comedies, action films, and prestige dramas. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1925 in The Bronx, New York, Curtis got his start in movies thanks mainly to his good looks. He first gained attention as a serious actor thanks to Alexander Mackendrick‘s searing drama “Sweet Smell of Success” (1957), in which he played an unscrupulous publicist who agrees to do the bidding of an amoral Broadway critic (Burt Lancaster). The film brought him a BAFTA nomination as Best Actor.

He earned his one and only Oscar bid the following year as Best Actor for Stanley Kramer‘s
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Perry Mason’ Series at HBO Casts John Lithgow

  • Variety
‘Perry Mason’ Series at HBO Casts John Lithgow
John Lithgow has joined the cast of the upcoming “Perry Mason” limited series at HBO, Variety has learned. He joins previously announced series lead Matthew Rhys as well as Tatiana Maslany.

“Perry Mason” was ordered to series back in March. Based on characters created by Erle Stanley Gardner, the limited series follows the origins of American fiction’s most legendary criminal defense lawyer (Rhys). When a child kidnapping case breaks down his door, Mason’s relentless pursuit of the truth reveals a fractured city and just maybe, a pathway to redemption for himself.

Lithgow will play Elias Birchard “E.B.” Jonathan, described as a personal attorney at the nadir of his career and a semi-regular employer of Mason. A mentor and a father figure to Mason, E.B. is handed the kind of case he hasn’t seen in years: a high-profile parallel investigation to the Lapd involving a case of child kidnapping.
See full article at Variety »

Susan Harrison, 'Sweet Smell of Success' Actress, Dies at 80

Susan Harrison, 'Sweet Smell of Success' Actress, Dies at 80
Susan Harrison, who starred opposite Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis as the sensitive younger sister of an unscrupulous newspaper columnist in the hard-boiled drama Sweet Smell of Success, has died. She was 80.

Harrison died March 5 at a nursing facility in North Hills, California, her daughter, Darva Arellano, told The Hollywood Reporter.

"She was an amazingly talented and highly trained actress who started acting on Broadway and became a bona fide movie star," Arellano wrote on Instagram. "She had many titles, but to me she was my sweet Mom, and there will never be another like her."

Outside ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Corey Stoll & Brian d’Arcy James Join Steven Spielberg’s ‘West Side Story’

  • Deadline
On the eve of the Disney-Fox merger, Fox’s Steven Spielberg West Side Story has tapped Corey Stoll to play Lieutenant Schrank, the New York City detective charged with quelling civic unrest in his racially-torn precinct, and Brian dʼArcy James to play the iconic role of Sergeant Krupke, the cop whose beat includes the territories of warring street gangs, the Sharks and the Jets, and who is the target of a classic Stephen Sondheim musical put-down.

Stoll and d’Arcy James join already announced cast members Rita Moreno, Ansel Elgort (Tony), Rachel Zegler (Maria), Ariana DeBose (Anita), David Alvarez (Bernardo) and Josh Andrés Rivera (Chino).

Stoll recently portrayed Buzz Aldrin in Universal’s First Man. His screen credits include Midnight in Paris (Independent Spirit Nomination), Ant-Man, The Seagull, This Is Where I Leave You and the upcoming Sopranos prequel movie The
See full article at Deadline »

Burt Lancaster movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Elmer Gantry,’ ‘Sweet Smell of Success,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’

  • Gold Derby
Burt Lancaster movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Elmer Gantry,’ ‘Sweet Smell of Success,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’
Burt Lancaster would’ve celebrated his 105th birthday on November 2, 2018. The Oscar-winning actor appeared in dozens of movies until his death in 1994. But which titles are among his finest? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of Lancaster’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1913, Lancaster got into acting after performing as an acrobat in the circus. He made his movie debut in 1946 with a leading role in the quintessential noir thriller “The Killers” (1946). He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor for Fred Zinnemann‘s wartime drama “From Here to Eternity” (1953), winning the prize just seven years later for playing a fast-talking preacher in “Elmer Gantry” (1960). Lancaster would compete twice more in the category (“Birdman of Alcatraz” in 1962 and “Atlantic City” in 1981).

In the 1950s, the actor decided to chart his own career by forming the production company Hecht-Hill-Lancaster, which churned
See full article at Gold Derby »

Burt Lancaster movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Burt Lancaster movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Burt Lancaster would’ve celebrated his 105th birthday on November 2, 2018. The Oscar-winning actor appeared in dozens of movies until his death in 1994. But which titles are among his finest? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of Lancaster’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1913, Lancaster got into acting after performing as an acrobat in the circus. He made his movie debut in 1946 with a leading role in the quintessential noir thriller “The Killers” (1946). He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor for Fred Zinnemann‘s wartime drama “From Here to Eternity” (1953), winning the prize just seven years later for playing a fast-talking preacher in “Elmer Gantry” (1960). Lancaster would compete twice more in the category (“Birdman of Alcatraz” in 1962 and “Atlantic City” in 1981).

In the 1950s, the actor decided to chart his own career by forming the production company Hecht-Hill-Lancaster, which churned
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Lithgow movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘World According to Garp,’ ‘Footloose’

  • Gold Derby
John Lithgow movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘World According to Garp,’ ‘Footloose’
Happy 73rd birthday on October 19, 2018, to one of the most honored actors in the business, John Lithgow! Whether it be recordings, television, the stage and film, Lithgow has had one of the most wide-ranging careers of any actor working today.

Lithgow has been nominated for two Academy Awards for his supporting performances (as a mild-mannered banker and a transsexual football player). For television, he has been nominated for 12 Emmy Awards, winning six, and has won two Golden Globe Awards from his five nominations. He has also been nominated for nine Screen Actors Guild Awards, of which he has won three times. For his stage work, Lithgow has won two Tony Awards (for 1973’s “The Changing Room” and 2002’s “Sweet Smell of Success”) from six Tony nominations. And he has even been nominated for four Grammy Awards for his recording work.

To celebrate this celebrated actor’s birthday, let’s look
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Lithgow movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
John Lithgow movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Happy 73rd birthday on October 19, 2018, to one of the most honored actors in the business, John Lithgow! Whether it be recordings, television, the stage and film, Lithgow has had one of the most wide-ranging careers of any actor working today.

Lithgow has been nominated for two Academy Awards for his supporting performances (as a mild-mannered banker and a transsexual football player). For television, he has been nominated for 12 Emmy Awards, winning six, and has won two Golden Globe Awards from his five nominations. He has also been nominated for nine Screen Actors Guild Awards, of which he has won three times. For his stage work, Lithgow has won two Tony Awards (for 1973’s “The Changing Room” and 2002’s “Sweet Smell of Success”) from six Tony nominations. And he has even been nominated for four Grammy Awards for his recording work.

To celebrate this celebrated actor’s birthday, let’s look
See full article at Gold Derby »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed