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Best Classic TV Shows to Stream Right Now — and Where to Watch Them

Best Classic TV Shows to Stream Right Now — and Where to Watch Them
With the need for content at a premium, it’s not just enough to stick to the shows you know. Television has a rich history going back decades, though you might not know it considering how much of it is — or, more often than not, isn’t — available to stream. But with so much time on our hands it’s worthwhile to seek out the shows made before the rise of the Peak TV streaming era that you can actually access. Prepare to laugh, cry, and scratch your head with some of the best classic TV shows available right now:

Note: “Classic” in this sense is defined as within the last 30 years. Hate to tell you, fellow millennials, but our television has officially gone retro.

More from IndieWireStream of the Day: Sofia Coppola's 'Bling Ring' Knows What It's Like to Feel DisconnectedNetflix Paying Talent Guarantees During Production
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Best Alfred Hitchcock Movie Posters, Ranked

10 Best Alfred Hitchcock Movie Posters, Ranked
Alfred Hitchcock is a distinct “auteur,” a director whose deft camerawork is omnipresent, creative and unique. He was also known for considerable innovation, even regarding special effects, such as the convincing plane crash in Foreign Correspondent. So it is especially memorable when Hitchcock’s advertising actually translated such inventive and visually defined movies.

Related: Alfred Hitchcock Presents: 5 Best & 5 Worst Episodes, According To IMDb

Granted, like many movie posters of the time, the majority of them merely feature some star-studded kiss. To Catch a Thief was set in the naturally romantic France, colorful and vibrant throughout yet its poster is moody and suspenseful. But there are some that stand out in capturing the personality of the corresponding film with slick inspiration.
See full article at Screen Rant »

How William Shatner Landed on “The Curse of Oak Island”

How William Shatner Landed on “The Curse of Oak Island”
It is hard to imagine an actor with a longer reach across the arc of television history than William Shatner. He is 88 years old, long past the time when most people have moved onto the next plane, let alone maintained an ongoing presence in popular culture. However, a career in front of the camera that dates all the way back to 1955 just keeps going. He made his film debut in The Brothers Karamazov, which starred Yul Brynner. He made guest-star appearances on such shows as Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Twilight Zone starting in 1955, and he got

How William Shatner Landed on “The Curse of Oak Island
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Gene Reynolds Dies: ‘M*A*S*H’ Co-Creator, TV Director-Producer & Ex-DGA President Was 96

  • Deadline
Gene Reynolds Dies: ‘M*A*S*H’ Co-Creator, TV Director-Producer & Ex-DGA President Was 96
Gene Reynolds, a former child actor who went on to co-create M*A*S*H and Lou Grant and direct and/or produced multiple other series and was a two-term DGA president, died Monday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank. He was 96.

Reynolds won six Emmys — from more than two dozen nominations — three DGA Awards and a WGA Award during a six-decade showbiz career that began as a preteen actor. He would continue with onscreen roles through the 1950s before segueing to producing and directing.

He got his start behind the camera writing the 1958-61 NBC Western Tales of Wells Fargo and soon began directing episodes of such enduring TV series as Leave It to Beaver, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Andy Griffith Show — co-starring a young Ron HowardFather of the Bride, The Munsters and more than 70- half-hours of the long-running Fred MacMurray sitcom My Three Sons.
See full article at Deadline »

The Oscar for Best Director doesn’t go to … 5 legendary filmmakers

The Oscar for Best Director doesn’t go to … 5 legendary filmmakers
With the Academy Awards just around the corner, it’s time to talk about the “who didn’ts” — the actors who never won an Oscas, let alone received a nomination-as well as classic films that never saw Oscar gold. And there are plenty of who didn’t filmmakers. Countless legendary directors didn’t win Oscars or even earn nominations.

Martin Scorsese, who is one of the most influential, acclaimed directors of the past 50 years has only won for directing 2006’s Best Picture winner “The Departed.” Though his 1976 masterpiece “Taxi Driver” was nominated for Best Picture, he didn’t earn an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He first got his first directing nomination for his 1980 masterwork “Raging Bull,” but lost to Robert Redford for “Ordinary People.”

Scorsese has received a lot of Oscar love. As far as producing, writing and directing, he’s received 14 nominations. And this year, he’s nominated
See full article at Gold Derby »

Iconic Character Actor Michael J. Pollard Dies at 80

Tony Sokol Nov 22, 2019

Michael J. Pollard was in the classic film Bonnie and Clyde, the classic series Star Trek and named a classic album.

Michael J. Pollard, a legendary character actor who was featured in Bonnie and Clyde, the original Star Trek, and House of 1000 Corpses, died in Los Angeles from cardiac arrest on Nov. 21, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 80.

Pollard's breakout role was as C.W. Moss, the gas station attendant who drove getaway cars in the 1967 gangster classic Bonnie and Clyde, starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. The role got Pollard nominated for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar. In a career spanning seven decades, Pollard created many memorable characters. He led the gang of orphan children in the 1966 Star Trek episode "Miri," which also featured Kim Darby. That same year he played character inspired by Peter Pan in in the Lost in Space episode "The Magic Mirror.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Michael J. Pollard, Oscar Nominee For "Bonnie And Clyde", Dead At 80

  • CinemaRetro
Trade magazine ad promoting Pollard's nomination for Best Supporting Actor Oscar in "Bonnie and Clyde".

By Lee Pfeiffer

Actor Michael J. Pollard has passed away from cardiac arrest at age 80. Pollard's unique look and acting style propelled him to fame in the 1960s. Pollard was born in New Jersey and crossed the river to study in the famed Actors Studio. He first appeared on Broadway in the smash hit production of "Bye Bye Birdie" and quickly became a familiar face on popular television programs including  "Gunsmoke", "Lost in Space", "The Andy Griffith Show", "Star Trek", "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis", "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", "Route 66", "I Spy", "The Fall Guy", "The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.", "Crime Story", "Superboy" and "Tales from the Crypt". Pollard's trademark onscreen persona was as a lovable but dim-witted, slow moving character. The image paid off handsomely for him when was cast as C.W. Moss
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Michael J. Pollard Dies: Oscar-Nominated ‘Bonnie And Clyde’ Actor Was 80

  • Deadline
Michael J. Pollard Dies: Oscar-Nominated ‘Bonnie And Clyde’ Actor Was 80
Michael J. Pollard, whose long list of acting credits stretches back to the late 1950s but likely will is best remembered for his Oscar-nominated, star-making turn as the dimwitted but lovable sidekick C.W. Moss in 1967’s Bonnie and Clyde, has died. He was 80.

His death was announced on Facebook today by filmmaker Rob Zombie, who directed Pollard in 2003’s House of 1000 Corpses. A New York Times obituary cites Pollard’s friend Dawn Walker, who says the actor died Thursday of cardiac arrest at a Los Angeles hospital.

“Another member of our House of 1000 Corpses family has left us,” Zombie wrote. “The great Michael J Pollard has died. I have been a huge fan of Michael since I first saw him on the Star Trek “Miri”. He was amazing in everything from Bonnie and Clyde to Little Fauss and Big Halsy from Dirty Little Billy to The Four of the Apocalypse.
See full article at Deadline »

Michael J. Pollard Dies, House of 1000 Corpses and Bonnie and Clyde Star Was 80

  • MovieWeb
Michael J. Pollard Dies, House of 1000 Corpses and Bonnie and Clyde Star Was 80
This morning brings about some sad news as we've learned Oscar-nominated actor Michael J. Pollard has passed away at the age of 80. The circumstances surrounding his passing have not yet been made clear. Rob Zombie, who directed the 2003 horror movie House of 1000 Corpses which featured Pollard in the role of Stucky, broke the news on Facebook with a touching message for the late actor. Here's what Zombie wrote about Pollard's passing on the post.

"We have lost another member of our House Of 1000 Corpses family. I woke up to the news that Michael J. Pollard had died. I have always loved his work and his truly unique on screen presence. He was one of the first actors I knew I had to work with as soon as I got my first film off the ground. He will be missed."

Included in Zombie's Facebook post is a photo from the
See full article at MovieWeb »

Rip Torn Dies: ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Emmy Winner & Broadway Veteran Was 88

  • Deadline
Rip Torn Dies: ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Emmy Winner & Broadway Veteran Was 88
Rip Torn, who played Garry Shandling’s profane, fiercely loyal producer on HBO’s The Larry Sanders Show, co-starred in the original Men in Black films and was a major star of Broadway and Off Broadway during a seven-decade career, died today surrounded by family at his home in Lakeville, Ct. He was 88.

The prolific Torn played the unstoppable and unflappable Artie on Larry Sanders, which aired from 1992-98 and followed the behind-the-scenes and onstage antics of a successful late-night network talk show. Along with scoring a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Emmy in 1996, he was nominated for each of the show’s six seasons.

The year Torn won his Emmy, he also had been up for Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his turn on CBSChicago Hope. In 2008, he earned his ninth and final Emmy nom, for his recurring role as Don Geiss on NBC’s 30 Rock.
See full article at Deadline »

Sydney Pollack movies: All 20 films as a director, ranked worst to best, including ‘Tootsie,’ ‘Out of Africa,’ ‘The Way We Were’

  • Gold Derby
Sydney Pollack movies: All 20 films as a director, ranked worst to best, including ‘Tootsie,’ ‘Out of Africa,’ ‘The Way We Were’
Sydney Pollack would’ve celebrated his 85th birthday on July 1, 2019. The Oscar winning filmmaker could’ve branded himself as Hollywood’s favorite journeyman, crafting solid entertainments for over 40 years. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 20 of his films as a director, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1934, Pollack got his start as an actor, studying under legendary New York teacher Sanford Meisner. He cut his teeth is television, appearing in such shows as “The Twilight Zone,” “Playhouse 90” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” before transitioning into directing for the small screen. Even after making a name for himself behind the camera, he kept popping up onscreen, starring in “The Player” (1992), “Husbands and Wives” (1992), “Eyes Wide Shut” (1999), “Changing Lanes” (2002), “Michael Clayton” (2007) and his own “Tootsie” (1982), to name but a few.

SEERobert Redford movies: 15 greatest films ranked from
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sydney Pollack movies: All 20 films as a director ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Sydney Pollack movies: All 20 films as a director ranked worst to best
Sydney Pollack would’ve celebrated his 85th birthday on July 1, 2019. The Oscar winning filmmaker could’ve branded himself as Hollywood’s favorite journeyman, crafting solid entertainments for over 40 years. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 20 of his films as a director, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1934, Pollack got his start as an actor, studying under legendary New York teacher Sanford Meisner. He cut his teeth is television, appearing in such shows as “The Twilight Zone,” “Playhouse 90” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” before transitioning into directing for the small screen. Even after making a name for himself behind the camera, he kept popping up onscreen, starring in “The Player” (1992), “Husbands and Wives” (1992), “Eyes Wide Shut” (1999), “Changing Lanes” (2002), “Michael Clayton” (2007) and his own “Tootsie” (1982), to name but a few.

It was this experience as a performer
See full article at Gold Derby »

Link Tank: Is Chernobyl Historically Accurate?

Spencer Mullen Jun 7, 2019

HBO's Chernobyl, The Handmaid's Tale, Keanu Reeves, and more in today's daily Link Tank!

How historically accurate is HBO's miniseries Chernobyl?

"We live in a time where people seem to be re-embracing the corrosive notion that what we want to be true is more important than what is true," Craig Mazin, the writer and creator of HBO's Chernobyl, told the Moscow Times; "This is why this story is more relevant than ever." And in many ways, his show is unbelievably painstaking in its fidelity to historical truth: Most of the actors play real people — saying and doing the things they are reported to have said and done — while everything from the graphite debris to the buckets used to take out the trash are scrupulous reproductions of the real thing. Entire scenes and storylines are lifted directly from Svetlana Alexievich's Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster.
See full article at Den of Geek »

23 Years Later, ‘Goosebumps: The Haunted Mask’ Is Still the Scariest Thing R.L. Stine’s Series Has Ever Produced

  • Indiewire
23 Years Later, ‘Goosebumps: The Haunted Mask’ Is Still the Scariest Thing R.L. Stine’s Series Has Ever Produced
The ’90s were a blessed time for spooky-not-scary TV for kids. Following the same anthology format that resonated with viewers of “The Twilight Zone” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” Nickelodeon introduced “Are You Afraid of the Dark?” to the inaugural edition of its Saturday night Snick lineup in August of 1992. That same summer also saw the premiere of R.L. Stine’s “Goosebumps” series, whose 231 books have sold more than 400 million copies in 32 different languages and spawned a movie franchise that continues with this weekend’s “Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween” (is there any other kind?).

It also resulted in a largely forgotten television adaptation that, like much else of its era, lives fondly in the hearts of millennials who face an uphill battle when trying to justify their love of it to anyone else. Most episodes of the hour-long show, each of which is based on one of Stine’s books, weren
See full article at Indiewire »

Days Of Our Lives Star Peggy McCay Dead at 90

Veteran actress Peggy McCay has died at the age of 90. The daytime star, best known as Caroline Brady on Days Of Our Lives, passed away on Oct. 7. “Our dearest Peggy McCay has left us,” Deidre Hall shared on Facebook. “She was a friend, an activist, and a real scrapper! I remember meeting her at the bedside of a dear, very ill friend. I backed her up as she ferociously took on doctors and nurses to make sure she had the very best care. She fought hard for all her causes. Passionate and tireless. And how she loved being Caroline!” McCay’s career took off when she starred as Vanessa Dale on the soap opera Love Of Life beginning in 1951. She left in 1955 to appear in numerous primetime television series such as Perry Mason, Maverick, and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. She returned to soaps with a role on ABC’s The Young
See full article at CBS Soaps in Depth »

Close-Up on Alfred Hitchcock's "The Trouble with Harry"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Alfred Hitchcock's The Trouble with Harry (1955) is showing from September 16 – October 16, 2018 in many countries around the world as part of the series Alfred Hitchcock: A Ticking Bomb.The illustrated opening credits of The Trouble with Harry, featuring cartoonish countryside drawings designed by Saul Steinberg, conclude on an amusingly lifeless body, a crudely sketched frame lying horizontal and rigid and looking quite at peace. When the film proper begins, shots of vibrant fall hues drench rolling Vermont hills in shades of similarly pastoral tranquility. In spots, the multicolored leaves have fallen indiscriminately to the ground. In one spot, there is the more conspicuous corpse of ill-fated Harry Worp (Philip Truex). In what might be the most overtly humorous camera angle of his career, director Alfred Hitchcock positions the image at ground level, leaving Harry’s feet thrust forward in the frame,
See full article at MUBI »

Cynthia Nixon, Robert Altman’s ‘Tanner ‘88,’ and Running For Public Office Now & Then

The Democratic primary for Governor of New York is on Thursday, September 13. Based on polls, it appears that incumbent Governor Andrew Cuomo will prevail and run for his third term despite the populist wave and attention around his primary opponent, actress Cynthia Nixon. Nixon, a longtime public-school and education activist, has never been in elected office, and her acting background has been characterized as both a blessing and curse with regard to her visibility and viability as a candidate. Her iconic role as Miranda Hobbes in the television program Sex & the City can be what Cuomo voters point to in not taking her seriously, in addition to her inexperience; meanwhile, Nixon’s campaign created apparel in the “I’m a Miranda Collection,” which includes t-shirts and tote bags with the slogans “I’m a Miranda and I’m voting for Cynthia.” Nixon’s campaign has played a delicate balancing act
See full article at The Film Stage »

Burt Reynolds, Star of ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit,’ Dies at 82

  • Variety
Burt Reynolds, Star of ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit,’ Dies at 82
Burt Reynolds, one of Hollywood’s most popular leading men during the ’70s and early ’80s in such films as “Deliverance,” “Smokey and the Bandit, “The Longest Yard” and “Semi-Tough,” has died. His rep confirmed that he died Thursday in Jupiter, Fla. He was 82.

He later earned an Oscar nomination as best supporting actor in Paul Thomas Anderson’s ode to skin flicks, “Boogie Nights.” He had been set to appear in Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Hollywood.”

Reynolds’ appeal lay in his post-modern macho posture undercut by a wry self-awareness, which he used to good effect in comedies as well as action films. For a period during the ’70s he was the nation’s top box office draw. But after one too many bad movies, his popularity waned. He returned to television, where he’d gotten his start, mostly in Westerns, and produced his own sitcom, “Evening Shade,” which brought him an Emmy.
See full article at Variety »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »
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