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Main Street to Broadway (1953)

Approved | | Music, Romance | 13 October 1953 (USA)
In New York City, a surly, down-on-his-heels playwright meets a country girl who's giving up trying to act and returning home. He goes with her for inspiration when his agent convinces a ... See full summary »

Director:

Tay Garnett

Writers:

Samson Raphaelson (screenplay), Robert E. Sherwood (story)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tommy Morton ... The Playwright - Tony Monaco (as Tom Morton)
Mary Murphy ... The Actress - Mary Craig
Agnes Moorehead ... Mildred Waterbury
Herb Shriner Herb Shriner ... Frank Johnson
Rosemary DeCamp ... The Mother - Mrs. Harry Craig
Clinton Sundberg ... The Father - Mr. Harry Craig
Tallulah Bankhead ... Talulah Bankhead
Ethel Barrymore ... Ethel Barrymore
Lionel Barrymore ... Lionel Barrymore
Gertrude Berg ... Tony's Neighbor at the NY Apartment House
Shirley Booth ... Shirley Booth
Louis Calhern ... Louis Calhern
Leo Durocher Leo Durocher ... Leo Durocher
Faye Emerson ... Faye Emerson
Oscar Hammerstein II ... Oscar Hammerstein
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Storyline

In New York City, a surly, down-on-his-heels playwright meets a country girl who's giving up trying to act and returning home. He goes with her for inspiration when his agent convinces a stage star to take his next effort. When he returns to Broadway, his girl stays behind and starts seeing a local businessman. Written by WesternOne

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Music | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 October 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Directo a Broadway See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Cinema Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This movie was shot on-location in New York City and stands as an invaluable document of the Broadway theater district as it existed during the Golden Age. Amongst other landmarks, this movie takes audiences in and around the legendary Empire Theatre, located at 1430 Broadway, between 40th and 41st Streets, which was already earmarked for demolition and would be razed several weeks after this footage was captured. See more »

Goofs

The orchestrator/musical director was Leo Arnaud but on the screen at the top of the movie the credits read Leon Arnaud. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Line King: The Al Hirschfeld Story (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

There's Music in You
by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II
Sung by Mary Martin (uncredited)
See more »

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User Reviews

 
One of the great guilty pleasures
31 July 2005 | by escheticSee all my reviews

MGM may have released it, but MAIN STREET TO Broadway plays like one of those student film projects which combine a dime's worth of financing, a brilliant concept and a dazzling cast who nearly surmount a nonexistent script and amateur direction to produce something "those in the know" HAVE to see.

Put together as an ad for Broadway and professional theatre, it is difficult to believe that respected Broadway playwright Robert E. Sherwood actually came up with THIS story. A supposedly promising "new wave" playwright, coming off a failed workshop about the nature of "independence" (no MAN should be tied down to a commitment to a woman - this was 1953 so there wasn't a hint of gay subtext) is persuaded by his eager agent (Agnes Moorehead - well, maybe just a hint of subtext) to write a play to show off Tallulah Bankhead as a normal American housewife, just like his girl's mom. (Well, maybe MORE than just a hint of that subtext.) The play is called CALICO AND LUST.

Most of screenwriter Samuel Raphaelson's script about the process of actually getting a play on has less credibility than the more famous wartime vehicle for shorter stage star cameos, STAGE DOOR CANTEEN, but when the parade of real stars and personalities starts rolling, you forgive it an awful lot.

The opening memorial to the beloved Empire Theatre is from a different film entirely (a documentary), but heart warming.

The mini-thread about the evolution of a Rodgers and Hammerstein song ("There's Music In You"), especially when legitimate musical superstar Mary Martin (just back from the London run of SOUTH PACIFIC) is working on it, rings true. If only the show R&H were *actually* working on at the time, ME AND JULIET, had had another song this good in it - 'though it did have the reworking of Rodgers' "Under The Southern Cross" from VICTORY AT SEA into the hit "No Other Love Have I".

While most of the familiar footage we have of famed director Josh Logan (who had directed SOUTH PACIFIC for R&H on stage and screen) is from this film, it's a pity they couldn't have also gotten their ME AND JULIET director (and Broadway immortal), George Abbott, into the film as well.

We DO get to see at least a glimpse of famed playwright John Van Druten working with the cast of the still running THE KING AND I, which he had directed for Rodgers & Hammerstein a year and a half before, and Tallulah (with all too few films to her credit) has a grand time playing a caricature of herself.

Contrary to most listings, Jack Gilford does NOT play himself (unless he actually was a theatre box office treasurer during the blacklist), but his presence is always a delight - even when miraculously coming up with a $2.40 balcony ticket to the playwright's sold-out opening for the playwright's girl's Hoagy Carmichael-ish Indiana boyfriend.

You may want to crawl into a hole when Gertrude Berg, as the playwright's overly enthusiastic landlady tries to drum up intermission enthusiasm at his floundering opening, but she plays the stereotype against an honest backdrop.

None of the problems of the movie are ascribable to the "plot actors." Although it's hard to find further credits for the playwright (Tom Morton) in either this database OR the Internet Broadway Database, one assumes he may have changed his name - he had all the makings of a strong young leading man just waiting for the right script, like A HATFUL OF RAIN or a Sunday IN NEW YORK. Rosemary DeCamp was already playing the "Mother" parts she specialized in on TV.

Wallow in the things and the personalities which do work, then screen a copy of Woody Allen's BULLETS OVER Broadway for a funnier - and more strangely credible - fiction about getting a play on...and imagine what a GREAT movie MAIN STREET TO Broadway might have been had the creators and their astonishing supporting cast of theatre stars had as much fun with their show as Allen and his company did. Since we can't have THAT film, at least we can have a great double feature blending both guilty and honest pleasure at the movies' version of theatre.


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