Racket Squad (1950) - News Poster

(1950–1953)

News

It’s Not TV: HBO, The Company That Changed Television: The Wasteland

The Wasteland:

Television is a gold goose that lays scrambled eggs;

and it is futile and probably fatal to beat it for not laying caviar.

Lee Loevinger

When people argue over the quality of television programming, both sides — it’s addictive crap v. underappreciated populist art — seem to forget one of the essentials about commercial TV. By definition, it is not a public service. It is not commercial TV’s job to enlighten, inform, educate, elevate, inspire, or offer insight. Frankly, it’s not even commercial TV’s job to entertain. Bottom line: its purpose is simply to deliver as many sets of eyes to advertisers as possible. As it happens, it tends to do this by offering various forms of entertainment, and occasionally by offering content that does enlighten, inform, etc., but a cynic would make the point that if TV could do the same job televising fish aimlessly swimming around an aquarium,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

William Asher obituary

Director of I Love Lucy, Bewitched and the Beach Party movies

William Asher, who has died aged 90 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, directed 100 episodes of I Love Lucy (1952-57) and 131 episodes of Bewitched (1964-72), far more than any other director on those two series. His name, appearing so regularly in the credits of such immensely popular Us sitcoms, became known to millions of television viewers all over the world.

Asher, who is often erroneously credited with having invented the TV sitcom – there were several adaptations of radio shows in the late 1940s – nevertheless gave a fresh impetus to the genre by using a multiple-camera setup for I Love Lucy. This enabled him to shoot the action simultaneously from different viewpoints, then select the best shots. Earlier sitcoms were broadcast live and recorded on kinescopes, or not recorded at all. Desilu Productions, founded by the comedy couple Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Dortort obituary

TV writer-producer who created the westerns Bonanza and The High Chaparral

With the Hollywood western in decline towards the end of the 1950s, fans of the genre were able to find some satisfaction in the growing number of western television series. Among the best of these were Bonanza (1959-73) and The High Chaparral (1967-71), both of which were conceived and produced by David Dortort, who has died aged 93.

Bonanza, the first primetime western in colour, was set on the Ponderosa ranch and focused on the adventures of the all-male Cartwright family – Adam (Pernell Roberts), Hoss (Dan Blocker) and Little Joe (Michael Landon), the sons of the thrice-widowed Ben (Lorne Greene), who was named after Dortort's own insurance salesman father.

The series was unusual for its concentration on a united family, rather than the traditional lone cowboy protagonist. It also contrasted with the increasing violence and blurring of the differences between
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Sky King' Actress Died of Pneumonia

Beloved U.S. TV actress Gloria Winters-Vernon has died at the age of 78. Winters-Vernon passed away at her home in Vista, California on August 14 after a battle with pneumonia, her family tells The Los Angeles Times.

As Gloria Winters she enjoyed guest acting roles in numerous 1950s series, including "Richard Diamond", "Private Detective", "Racket Squad" and "Death Valley Days" - but she was perhaps best-known for her role as Penny in TV western "Sky King". She retired shortly after the series went off the air in 1959 but found love on the hit show before she quit acting, marrying Dean Vernon, a sound engineer on "Sky King" who died in 2001.

The "Sky King" role also inspired her to write an etiquette book for young girls, entitled "Penny's Guide to Teenage Charm and Personality" - which inspired alternative band Nada Surf's 1996 song and video "Popular"

.

Winters-Vernon is survived by her sister-in-law,
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Actress Winters-Vernon Dies Of Pneumonia

  • WENN
Beloved U.S. TV actress Gloria Winters-vernon has died at the age of 78.

Winters-Vernon passed away at her home in Vista, California on 14 August after a battle with pneumonia, her family tells The Los Angeles Times.

As Gloria Winters she enjoyed guest acting roles in numerous 1950s series, including Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Racket Squad and Death Valley Days - but she was perhaps best-known for her role as Penny in TV western Sky King.

She retired shortly after the series went off the air in 1959 but found love on the hit show before she quit acting, marrying Dean Vernon, a sound engineer on Sky King who died in 2001.

The Sky King role also inspired her to write an etiquette book for young girls, entitled Penny's Guide to Teenage Charm and Personality - which inspired alternative band Nada Surf's 1996 song and video Popular.

Winters-Vernon is survived by her sister-in-law, Phyllis DeCinces.

See also

External Sites


Recently Viewed