Key Largo (1948) - News Poster

(1948)

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Man Without a Star

Man Without a Star

Blu ray

Kino Lorber

1955/ 2.00:1 / 89 min.

Starring Kirk Douglas, William Campbell, Jeanne Crain, Claire Trevor

Cinematography by Russell Metty

Directed by King Vidor

King Vidor, the director behind the bucolic Kansas sequences in The Wizard of Oz and the histrionics of Duel in the Sun, has it both ways in 1955’s Man Without a Star starring Kirk Douglas.

Douglas follows his director’s lead – acting primarily with his teeth, the eager to please ham gives a performance almost as broad as his wayward sailor in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. But as screenwriter Borden Chase slowly pulls back the masks on his characters, Douglas settles into a more reasonable approximation of a human being.

Closing in on 40, the irrepressible show-off plays a wandering cowpoke named Dempsey Rae who follows constellations for clues to his destiny and so far he’s come up empty – the “man without a star.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Serenity Review

  • HeyUGuys
In Serenity, Matthew McConaughey plays a hard-drinking fisherman with a murky past who is on the trail of his own Moby Dick, a large tuna fish called Justice. Written and directed by Stephen Knight (Locke), the film appears to be a rather messy amalgamation of Neo-Noir clichés and heavily coded tropes and never quite manages to get to the point, and in the end winds up sounding like the ramblings of a mad man.

The action takes place on the fictional Island of Plymouth where a small fishing community lives off the few wealthy tourists hoping to catch the “big one” and where Baker Dill (McConaughey), the captain of a small fishing boat hopes to make ends meet in between drowning his sorrows in a bottle of rum and late night hook-ups with his lover Constance (Diane Lane). Things take a turn for the sinister when mysterious femme fatal Katherine
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Bogey and Bacall in Key Largo Screening at 9pm February 26th at Webster University

“When your head says one thing and your whole life says another, your head always loses.”

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in Key Largo screens at Webster University Tuesday February 26th. The screening will be at 9:00 at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here. This is the third of four This is the final film in the Humphrey Bogart/Lauren Bacall collaborations screening at Webster in February.

Humphrey Bogart stars as retired Army Major Frank McCloud, a drifter who has traveled to Key Largo in southern Florida for a new life path and stops on the way to give condolences to the father, James Temple, and his widow, Nora (Bacall), of a friend who died during the Second World War. Temple runs a hotel on the island, though he is greeted most inhospitably by the hotel’s only residents,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Oscars made history 70 years ago with the first foreign Best Picture winner

The Oscars made history 70 years ago with the first foreign Best Picture winner
The first 15 years of the Academy Awards were banquet held at various swanky hotels in Los Angeles from the Blossom Room at the Hollywood Roosevelt, the Cocoanut Grove and Fiesta Room at the Ambassador and the Sala D’Doro and the Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore.

Because the ceremony had grown in attendance and importance, the Oscars finally graduated its 16thyear on March 2, 1944 moving to the Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, which then had a capacity of 2,258.

When the ranks of academy members grew two-fold, the Oscars moved to the Shrine Auditorium for the 19thand 20thceremonies. The Shrine was so big-it holds 6,700 seats-the general public was even invited to buy tickets.

But everything changed with the 21stceremony which took place on March 24, 1949. The studio decided to withdraw financial support for the Academy Awards “in order to remove rumors that they had been trying to exert their influence on votes,” explained Robert
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Serenity’: Matthew McConaughey & Anne Hathaway Star In This Insane, Campy Neo-Noir [Review]

If “Serenity” were a book, it’d be the sort of trashy beach-ready thriller you’d read on a Kindle, so you’d be saved the raised eyebrows as a result of the embarrassing cover. But just like a book, you cannot judge this movie by appearances. Written and directed by Steven Knight, this would-be neo-noir at first appears to angle for “Key Largo” territory, but then swerves toward some forgotten ’80s pulp, before taking a whiplash-inducing hard left into something else entirely.

Continue reading ‘Serenity’: Matthew McConaughey & Anne Hathaway Star In This Insane, Campy Neo-Noir [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Maltese Falcon,’ ‘African Queen’

  • Gold Derby
Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Maltese Falcon,’ ‘African Queen’
Here’s looking at you, Humphrey Bogart. The Oscar-winning leading man would’ve celebrated his 119th birthday on December 25, 2018. Best known for playing a tough guy with a heart of gold, Bogart made dozens of films before his untimely death in 1957. But how many of those titles are classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Though it may sound like a bit of Hollywood lore, Bogart was indeed born on Christmas Day, 1899, in New York City. After a short stint in the Navy, he started acting onstage and in films, mostly in bit parts as gangsters who met the wrong end of a bullet.

SEEOscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

His big breakthrough came with the Broadway hit “The Petrified Forest,” in which he played a violent bank robber holed up at
See full article at Gold Derby »

Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Here’s looking at you, Humphrey Bogart. The Oscar-winning leading man would’ve celebrated his 119th birthday on December 25, 2018. Best known for playing a tough guy with a heart of gold, Bogart made dozens of films before his untimely death in 1957. But how many of those titles are classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Though it may sound like a bit of Hollywood lore, Bogart was indeed born on Christmas Day, 1899, in New York City. After a short stint in the Navy, he started acting onstage and in films, mostly in bit parts as gangsters who met the wrong end of a bullet.

His big breakthrough came with the Broadway hit “The Petrified Forest,” in which he played a violent bank robber holed up at an isolated diner with a hobo and a waitress. When
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bad Times at the El Royale’s Drew Goddard Ready to Finally Check into Noir

David Crow Oct 12, 2018

Drew Goddard tells us about the allure of film noir during the making of Bad Times at the El Royale, and why it could only be set in 1969.

It’s a classic setup: seven strangers, six guests and one glorified bellhop, spend the night in a faded luxury hotel, and each of them is carrying at least one dangerous secret. It’s the stuff noir dreams are made of, including those of writer-director Drew Goddard.

The eclectic filmmaker confessed as much when chatted about Bad Times at the El Royale, a project whose conceit has stayed in Goddard’s mind ever since he created and worked on the first season of Netflix’s Daredevil. Indeed, it was during pitches for those early episodes when one of the all-time film noir classics, John Huston’s Key Largo, came up as a point of reference. As Goddard tells us,
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ Review: Drew Goddard’s Fiendishly Clever Second Film Proves ‘Cabin in the Woods’ Was No Fluke

  • Indiewire
‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ Review: Drew Goddard’s Fiendishly Clever Second Film Proves ‘Cabin in the Woods’ Was No Fluke
Drew Goddard likes to watch. As he made clear in his sly and self-reflexive 2012 debut “The Cabin in the Woods,” he likes to place his characters in a hall of mirrors that only he can see clearly, and he likes to make his audiences to shudder at their own reflections in the glass.

Of the many things his rollicking second feature has in common with his previous one, the most fundamental is that both films take a genre that’s grown painfully stale, step back until we’re looking at it from a god’s-eye view, and then — however damning it might be — force us reckon with what we love about them. With “The Cabin in the Woods,” Goddard deconstructed horror tropes from the inside out in order to explore how slashers and monster movies satiate the collective bloodlust that we bring into the theater. And with the clever, patient,
See full article at Indiewire »

Lauren Bacall movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Big Sleep,’ ‘Key Largo,’ ‘Mirror Has Two Faces’

  • Gold Derby
Lauren Bacall movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Big Sleep,’ ‘Key Largo,’ ‘Mirror Has Two Faces’
Lauren Bacall would’ve celebrated her 94th birthday on September 16. The Hollywood icon showed no signs of slowing down, continuing to work until her death in 2014 at the age of 89. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Bacall made her feature debut with Howard Hawks‘ adventure yarn “To Have and Have Not” (1945). The film was a landmark for the actress in both her career and her life, since it was how she met her future husband Humphrey Bogart. The two would become a legendary couple off-screen and on, making three subsequent features together: “The Big Sleep” (1946), “Dark Passage” (1947), and “Key Largo” (1948).

Despite her hefty filmography, Bacall received just one Oscar nomination in her career: Best Supporting Actress for “The Mirror Has Two Faces” (1996), in which she played Barbra Streisand‘s domineering mother. After victories at the Golden Globes and SAG,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Lauren Bacall movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Lauren Bacall movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Lauren Bacall would’ve celebrated her 94th birthday on September 16. The Hollywood icon showed no signs of slowing down, continuing to work until her death in 2014 at the age of 89. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Bacall made her feature debut with Howard Hawks‘ adventure yarn “To Have and Have Not” (1945). The film was a landmark for the actress in both her career and her life, since it was how she met her future husband Humphrey Bogart. The two would become a legendary couple off-screen and on, making three subsequent features together: “The Big Sleep” (1946), “Dark Passage” (1947), and “Key Largo” (1948).

Despite her hefty filmography, Bacall received just one Oscar nomination in her career: Best Supporting Actress for “The Mirror Has Two Faces” (1996), in which she played Barbra Streisand‘s domineering mother. After victories at the Golden Globes and SAG,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Night Moves

Arthur Penn’s detective movie is one of the best ever in the genre, one that rewards repeat viewings particularly well. Gumshoe Harry Moseby compartmentalizes his marriage, his job, his past and the greedy Hollywood has-beens he meets, not realizing that everything is interconnected, and fully capable of assembling a world-class conspiracy. Gene Hackman tops a sterling cast in the film that introduced most of us to Melanie Griffith.

Night Moves

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date August 15, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gene Hackman, Jennifer Warren, Melanie Griffith, Susan Clark, Edward Binns, Harris Yulin, Kenneth Mars, Janet Ward, James Woods, Anthony Costello.

Cinematography: Bruce Surtees

Production Designer: George Jenkins

Film Editor: Dede Allen

Original Music: Michael Small

Written by Alan Sharp

Produced by Robert M. Sherman

Directed by Arthur Penn

Night Moves is a superb detective thriller that plays with profound ideas without getting its fingers burned.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance
'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Why Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Murders Project Would Be a Radical Change of Pace

Why Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Murders Project Would Be a Radical Change of Pace
It’s safe to say that Quentin Tarantino is not happy about Tuesday’s breaking news that his next almost-finished untitled script is based on the true history of the Charles Manson murders. That’s because the writer-director, who is one of Hollywood’s great true auteurs with a unique voice that is inimitable, likes to write his screenplays in private.

Tarantino is an artist, backed by patrons Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who has routinely turned down big-studio directing gigs in order to pursue his own muse. And he can be sensitive to the slings and arrows of public opinion. That’s because he wants to leave a meaningful cinematic legacy of just 10 films. So while he could always change his mind (as Steven Soderbergh did) about his career path, Tarantino does not take lightly his choice of what those last two films will be. (The last one might be “Kill Bill: Vol. 3,
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Murders Project Would Be a Radical Change of Pace

Why Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Murders Project Would Be a Radical Change of Pace
It’s safe to say that Quentin Tarantino is not happy about Tuesday’s breaking news that his next almost-finished untitled script is based on the true history of the Charles Manson murders. That’s because the writer-director, who is one of Hollywood’s great true auteurs with a unique voice that is inimitable, likes to write his screenplays in private.

Tarantino is an artist, backed by patrons Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who has routinely turned down big-studio directing gigs in order to pursue his own muse. And he can be sensitive to the slings and arrows of public opinion. That’s because he wants to leave a meaningful cinematic legacy of just 10 films. So while he could always change his mind (as Steven Soderbergh did) about his career path, Tarantino does not take lightly his choice of what those last two films will be. (The last one might be “Kill Bill: Vol. 3,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

"Peyton Place" 60th Anniversary Screening, July 12, L.A.

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Mark Robson’s 1957 film Peyton Place celebrates its 60th anniversary with a special screening at the Royal Theatre in Los Angeles. The film, which runs 157 minutes, stars Lana Turner, Lee Philips, Lloyd Nolan, Arthur Kennedy, Russ Tamblyn, Terry More, and Hope Lange.

Please Note: Actress Terry Moore is currently scheduled to appear at the screening as part of a Q & A regarding the film and her career.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

Peyton Place (1957)

60th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, July 12, at 7:00 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Q & A with Co-Star Terry Moore

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 60th anniversary screening of 'Peyton Place,' the smash hit movie version of Grace Metalious’s best-selling novel. The film earned nine top Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Marjorie Morningstar

The most-read book since Gone with the Wind looked at the coming of age struggle of an ambitious, upwardly mobile Jewish girl in the 1930s. This glossy film version gives Natalie Wood an ‘adult’ role and provides Gene Kelly with the seemingly optimal character of a troubled theatrical artiste. Good intentions aside, the show lacks guidance — and may have harmed Kelly’s acting career.

Marjorie Morningstar

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1958 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 128 min. / Street Date May 9, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Natalie Wood, Gene Kelly, Claire Trevor, Everett Sloane, Martin Milner, Carolyn Jones, Martin Balsam, Edd Byrnes, George Tobias, Jesse White, Paul Picerni, Ruta Lee, Shelley Fabares, Lana Wood.

Cinematography: Harry Stradling

Film Editor: Folmar Blangsted

Original Music: Max Steiner

Written by Everett Freeman from the novel by Herman Wouk

Produced by Milton Sperling

Directed by Irving Rapper

When doing interviews for West Side Story we found out that
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

My Costar, My Spouse: 15 Celeb Couples Who Took Their Romance to the Big Screen

My Costar, My Spouse: 15 Celeb Couples Who Took Their Romance to the Big Screen
A movie starring two famous actors who happen to be married in real-life: On paper, it sounds like it should be a sure-fire win. In reality? It’s not that simple.

It’s no wonder that famous couples might be hesitant to collaborate in a movie, even if it was guaranteed to smash the box office: Working with your spouse is hard, and it wouldn’t make it any easier to know that throngs of people would be examining the final product, looking for all possible glimpses into your personal life.

Occasionally, some famous couples have considered that possibility and decided,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Cul-De-Sac’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Donald Pleasence, Lionel Stander, Françoise Dorléac, Jack MacGowran, Iain Quarrier | Written by Roman Polanski, Gerard Brach | Directed by Roman Polanski

Roman Polanski’s taste for dark absurdist comedy is in full swing in 1966 comedy-thriller Cul-De-Sac. It’s his second English-language film, sandwiched between Repulsion and Fearless Vampire Killers. Compared with his towering classics (and there are a few) it is slight, but even minor Polanski is a joy to watch.

Especially with a setup like this. We open with Dickey (Lionel Stander, the spit of Ernest Borgnine) and Albie (Jack MacGowran), their car sputtering along the Northumberland coast. Albie is dying from a gunshot wound, so Dickey heads off for help, and finds himself on a coastal island, in a castle owned by George (Donald Pleasence) and his glamorous wife Teresa (Françoise Dorléac).

So begins a strange semi-hostage relationship between the very American gangsters and the gentle married couple.
See full article at Nerdly »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Directors and the film which made them great Part 2

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

The Directors, The Auteurs, the Commanders of the Ship, Masters of All They Survey. This is the second of this two-part series on the greatest directors with more of cinematic luminaries under the spotlight. You can see the first part of this article here. You can catch up with the greatest writers, and the greatest actors here.

Here’s Part Two.

Howard HawksThe Big Sleep

Hawks, like his peer Billy Wilder, proved a genre-hopping master. Like Wilder, he had his crime/noir masterpieces (Scarface, The Big Sleep) and his comedies (Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday). Hawks also did a strong line in westerns, with Red River and Rio Bravo the best known and best regarded of this latter-career focus of his. As with any director who covers a lot of thematic ground during their career, it can be difficult to choose a “Best”, as you
See full article at HeyUGuys »
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