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Ten Years Of The TCM Classic Film Festival

The 10th annual TCM Classic Film Festival is finally in the books, yet another fabulous, frustrating and altogether marvelous gathering in the heart of Hollywood to designed to revel in the history of movies and encourage the continued appreciation of the value of understanding where the movies have come from, how they’ve come to the place they are, and even a moment or two to consider possible futures, both for the path on which the movies find themselves and for the future of the festival itself. As always, I have filed my report on this year’s activities—movies watched, schedules contemplated, favorite people visited—for Slant magazine’s blog The House Next Door—and if I came off in that report a little crankier than usual, that dissatisfaction is borne from love for what Tcmff does so well every year and concern for some of the more commerce-oriented
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Desert Fury

The murky crimes of sordid characters come to the fore in the wide-open Nevada spaces… producer Hal Wallis’ Technicolor noir concentrates on the possessive and perverse competition for Lizabeth Scott’s luscious blonde — the mother that wants to corral her, the gangster who thinks she’s an escape and the local hunk who wears a badge. Robert Rossen’s edgy screenplay depicts its violent action on a psychological level.

Desert Fury

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1947 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 96 min. / Street Date Feb 26, 2019 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Burt Lancaster, Lizabeth Scott, John Hodiak, Wendell Corey, Mary Astor, Kristine Miller, William Harrigan, James Flavin, Anna Camargo, Ray Teal.

Cinematography: Edward Cronjager, Charles Lang

Film Editor: Warren Low

Original Music: Miklos Rosza

Written by Robert Rossen from the novel by Ramona Stewart

Produced by Hal B. Wallis

Directed by Lewis Allen

As he was under contract to Hal Wallis, Burt Lancaster
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Mubi's Favorite Films of 2018

  • MUBI
For 11 years running, our end-of-the-year tradition on the Notebook has been to poll our roster of contributors to create fantasy double features of new and old films. But what about the curators behind Mubi itself? This year we begin what we hope to be a new tradition: publishing the favorite films of the year as chosen by our programming team: Daniel Kasman in the U.S., Anaïs Lebrun and Chiara Marañón in the U.K. We each have two lists: our top new films that premiered in 2018, and then a selection of revivals screened in cinemas.PREMIERESDaniel Kasman1. Blue (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Thailand)2. The Image Book (Jean-Luc Godard, Switzerland)3. Support the Girls (Andrew Bujalski, USA)4. The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, USA)5. The Waldheim Waltz (Ruth Beckermann, Austria)6. Unsane (Steven Soderbergh, USA)7. The Grand Bizarre (Jodie Mack, USA)8. The Red Shadow [director's cut]9. What You Gonna Do When the World's on Fire?
See full article at MUBI »

The Shining, Rebecca, and Jurassic Park Selected for the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress

  • DailyDead
Founded 30 years ago, the National Film Registry has annually added 25 movies to its archives for preservation based on their "cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage," and this year's selections are no exception. The 25 new additions to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress were revealed today, including a trio of movies (all of them book adaptations) that should warm the hearts of horror and suspense fans: Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park, and Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca.

Read on for an excerpt from the Library of Congress' official press release, and visit their website for full details on their 2018 selections.

From the Press Release: "Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 of America’s most influential motion pictures to be inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress because of their cultural,
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‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining,’ ‘Monterey Pop’ Added to National Film Registry

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining,’ ‘Monterey Pop’ Added to National Film Registry
Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining and D.A. Pennebaker’s concert film Monterey Pop were among the 25 films added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry, which recognizes motion pictures that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said Thursday. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

“It was for us a vast undertaking,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Shining,’ ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ and 23 More Titles Added to National Film Registry

The Library of Congress has announced the 25 films joining the National Film Registry in 2018. The most well-known titles in this year’s group include Ang Lee’s “Brokeback Mountain,” Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rebecca,” Steven Spielberg’s “Jurassic Park,” and James L. Brooks’ “Broadcast News.” Films that make the cut have been deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and will be preserved under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating, and preserving this distinctive medium,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes, and dreams.”

With the 25 new additions, the National Film Registry now has a total of 750 titles. “Brokeback Mountain,” released in 2005, is the most recently released film to be added to the Registry this year.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Shining,’ ‘Rebecca,’ ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘The Lady From Shanghai’ & More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2005, they’ve now reached 750 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2018 list, which includes Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain, Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca, and Orson WellesThe Lady From Shanghai. There’s also Steven Spielberg’s blockbuster behemoth Jurassic Park, Samuel Fuller’s stellar noir Pickup on South Street, the riveting, harrowing documentary Hearts and Minds, and much more.

Check out the full list below and you can watch some films on the registry for free here.

1. Bad Day at Black Rock (1955)

2. Broadcast News (1987)

3. Brokeback Mountain (2005)

4. Cinderella (1950)

5. Days of Wine and Roses (1962)

6. Dixon-Wanamaker Expedition to Crow Agency

7. Eve
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’ Added to National Film Registry

  • The Wrap
‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’ Added to National Film Registry
Jurassic Park,” “My Fair Lady,” “Brokeback Mountain” and “The Shining” were among the 25 American films inducted into the National Film Registry, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced Wednesday.

Selection to the registry will help ensure that these films will be preserved for all time because of their cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” Hayden said. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

Also Read: 'Titanic,' 'The Goonies,' 'Superman' Added to National Film Registry

This year’s films span 107 years, from 1898 to 2005. They include blockbusters, documentaries, silent movies, animation and independent films. The 2018 selections bring the number of films in the registry to 750, a small fraction of the Library’s
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘My Fair Lady’ Added to National Film Registry

  • Variety
‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘My Fair Lady’ Added to National Film Registry
Brokeback Mountain,” “Jurassic Park,” “My Fair Lady,” “The Shining,” “Hud” and “Monterey Pop” are among the best known titles among this year’s additions to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.

A place on the list — always made up of 25 films — guarantees the film will be preserved under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act. The criteria for selection is that the movies are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

The 2018 selections bring the total number of films in the registry to 750. Hayden will discuss the 25 new films with Leonard Maltin on Turner Classic Movies at 8 p.m. E.T. Wednesday.

The new titles
See full article at Variety »

A Lost Paradise: An Interview with Pordenone Silent Film Festival Artistic Director Jay Weissberg

  • MUBI
John M. Stahl's The Song of LifeFollowing the retrospective dedicated to the sound films of American director John M. Stahl (1886 – 1950) at Il Cinema Ritrovato in Bologna earlier this year, I decided to also attend for the first time Le Giornate del Cinema Muto, because the Pordenone Silent Film Festival, as it is known in English, was presenting a series of silent films from this master of melodrama. Best known for his Technicolor noir, Leave Her to Heaven (1945), Stahl's silent films have been long forgotten, but are now back in discussion after receiving much-deserved attention.The festival was a major discovery for me. It has only one cinema venue, with 35mm screenings from morning to night, and a packed and devoted audience full of appetite for discoveries and re-discoveries. Its wild cinephilic spirit and the unbeatable program composed of rarities and canonical classics prove that the Pordenone Silent Film Festival
See full article at MUBI »

Criterion Collection: The Naked Prey (1965) | Blu-ray Review

When one thinks of Cornel Wilde, a veritable Hollywood everyman who was peppered across a variety of noir and studio productions throughout the 1940s and 50s, he potentially conjures nostalgic memories from his leading man days. But the potential Olympian, who would forego a promising athletic career to pursue acting, was perhaps more a prototype for the similar trajectory of someone like a John Cassavetes, another actor who would eventually spend his later career fashioning an impressive directorial resume.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Exclusive Interview: Paul Kyriazi on Forbidden Power

david j. moore chats with filmmaker Paul Kyriazi on Forbidden Power…

In the heyday of the grindhouse era, it was quite common for filmmakers to use action, sex, and thrills to spice up their genre jambalayas, and filmmaker Paul Kyriazi came up during that period, with cult classics like Death Machines (1976), The Weapons of Death (1981), Ninja Busters (1984), and Omega Cop (1990) to his credit. After a long hiatus (nearly 30 years!), Kyriazi is back with the sexy science fiction film noir hybrid Forbidden Power, which hinges on the story hook “What if a man contracts sexually transmitted superpowers?” The plot has the hero running away from danger straight into more danger, and making a stunning discovery that his newly developed powers are part of a grand design to take over the world. In this candid interview, Kyriazi discusses his inspirations for this outlandish genre adventure, while also discussing the themes of the film at length.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

O The Choices I Have! A 2018 Tcmff Preamble

So much time, so few movies to see. Scratch that. Reverse it.

Running a little later than usual this year, the 2018 Turner Classic Movies Film Festival gets under way this coming Thursday, screening approximately 88 films and special programs over the course of the festival’s three-and-a-half days, beginning Thursday evening, and no doubt about it, this year’s schedule, no less than any other year, will lay out a banquet for classic film buffs, casual film fans and harder-core cinephiles looking for the opportunity to see long-time favorites as well as rare and unusual treats on the big screen. I’ve attended every festival since its inaugural run back in 2010, and since then if I have not reined in my enthusiasm for the festival and being given the opportunity to attend it every year, then I have at least managed to lasso my verbiage. That first year I wrote about
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Film News: TCM Host & Film Historian Robert Osborne Dies at 84

New York City – Robert Osborne, one of the great film advocates and historians of our era, who hosted on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) with passionate skill from 1994 until recently, has passed away on March 6th, 2017, in New York City. The way that Mr. Osborne inspired film lovers everywhere was deep and influential. He was 84.

I was lucky enough to meet the man, naturally at a Chicago movie theater, back in 2005. Five years later, as I became a film reporter myself, I got to interview Ro via phone. He was the type of film man that you could spend a month with and never come to the end of his knowledge, and the way he shared it as the host on TCM was as if the finest uncle was giving us life lessons. Next to Roger Ebert, Robert Osborne is another reporter legend who galvanized my love for film.

King of the Classics: Robert Osborne,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

Locarno Blog. Gene Tierney

  • MUBI
The Notebook is the North American home for Locarno Film Festival Artistic Director Carlo Chatrian's blog. Chatrian has been writing thoughtful blog entries in Italian on Locarno's website since he took over as Director in late 2012, and now you can find the English translations here on the Notebook as they're published. The Locarno Film Festival will be taking place August 2 - 12. We can begin with one of those anecdotes that are the stuff of Hollywood, marking the birth of a star and mapping out a whole career. Gene Tierney had already caught the eye of Anatole Litvak when aged only 17 and, after a happy period of study abroad (right here in Switzerland, in Lausanne), had been invited by a cousin to visit a Hollywood film set. But she took her father’s advice and turned down an offer from Warner Bros in favor of starting on the stage, on Broadway.
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Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row
The American Society of Cinematographers awarded Emmanuel Lubezki his third consecutive win for “The Revenant.” Should he repeat at the Oscars, he’ll be the first person in history to win Best Cinematography three years in a row, and will be one away from tying Leon Shamroy and Joseph Ruttenberg for the most overall wins in this category. Shamroy prevailed for “The Black Swan” [1942], “Wilson” [1944], “Leave Her to Heaven” [1945], and “Cleopatra” [1963]. And Ruttenberg was crowned champ for “The Great Waltz” [1938], “Mrs. Miniver” [1942], “Somebody Up There Likes Me” [1956], and “Gigi” [1958]. -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Lubezki competes at the Oscars against Ed Lachman (“Carol”), three-time Oscar champ Robert Richardson (“The Hateful Eight&r...
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NYC Weekend Watch: Todd Haynes, ‘1941,’ ‘Gun Crazy,’ ‘Battleship Potemkin’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

The release of Carol (our coverage can be found here) brings “Todd Haynes: The Other Side of Dreams,” which will pair the director’s work with his personal favorites. Safe and Imitation of Life show on Friday; on Saturday, see “Todd Haynes: Rarities” — which brings Dottie Gets Spanked,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Predict Best Cinematography Oscar: Emmanuel Lubezki ('Revenant') could win three in a row

Predict Best Cinematography Oscar: Emmanuel Lubezki ('Revenant') could win three in a row
As we launch the Best Cinematography category in our Oscars predictions center, several people have a chance to make history at this year's ceremony. For instance, Emmanuel Lubezki has won the award for the last two years ("Gravity" in 2013, "Birdman" in 2014), and as the cinematographer for "The Revenant" this year he has a chance to go three-for-three, which would make him the first in Oscar history to win in three consecutive years. -Break- Experts' Oscar predictions update: 'Spotlight' pulls further ahead of 'Joy' with 'The Martian' rising fast As it stands, Lubezki is one of only four to have won back-to-back. The others were Leon Shamroy ("Wilson" in 1944, "Leave Her to Heaven" in 1945), Winton Hoch ("Joan of Arc" in 1948, "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" in 1949) and John Toll ("Legends of the Fall" in 1994, "Braveheart" in 1995). It...
See full article at Gold Derby »

Beggars of Light: The Nitrate Picture Show 2015

  • MUBI
"The music seemed extraordinarily fresh and genuine still. It might grow old-fashioned, he told himself, but never old, surely, while there was any youth left in men. It was an expression of youth–that, and no more; with sweetness and foolishness, the lingering accent, the heavy stresses–the delicacy, too–belonging to that time."—"The Professor's House," Willa CatherHis last words, in a hospital four months later, are said to have been 'Mind your own business!' addressed to an enquirer after the state of his bowels. Friends got to the studio just before the wreckers' ball. Pictures, a profusion, piles of them, littered the floor: of 'a world that will never be seen except in pictures'"—"The Pound Era," Hugh Kenner***Heart Of FIREOften when I go to a movie, usually one made before 1960, I think about the opening scene of The Red Shoes, of Marius Goring and his
See full article at MUBI »
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