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This Is the Army (1943) Poster

Trivia

When Irving Berlin was filming his rendition of "Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning", one of the stagehands, unaware of who the singer was, supposedly said that if the guy who wrote the song could hear Berlin's singing, he'd roll over in his grave.
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Bette Davis insisted Warner's studio boss Jack L. Warner contribute the profits from this film to the war effort.
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This film was the number-one moneymaker of 1943.
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This was the first Warner Bros. musical shot in three-strip Technicolor.
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"Yip Yip Yaphank," the World War I all-soldier show shown the beginning of the movie, was an actual World War I all-soldier show. It was composed and produced by Irving Berlin while he was a US Army Recruit at Camp Upton in Yaphank, New York.
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(1942) Stage: "This Is the Army" premiered on Broadway. Musical revue. Music / lyrics by Irving Berlin. Book by James McColl and Irving Berlin. Musical Director: Milton Rosenstock. Dialogue for Minstrel Show by Pvt. Jack Mendelsohn, Pfc. Richard Burdick and Pvt. Tom McDonnell. Music arrangements for dances by Pvt. Melvin Pahl. Scenic Design / Costume Design by Pvt. John Koenig. Choreographed by Cpl. Edgar Nelson Barclift and Sgt. Robert Sidney. Additional direction by Joshua Logan. Military Formations by Chester O'Brien. Directed by Sgt. Ezra Stone. Broadway Theatre: 4 Jul 1942-26 Sep 1942 (113 performances). Cast: Pvt. Justus Addiss, Alan Anderson, Arthur Atkins, Pvt. Leonard Berchman, Eugene Leander Berg, Sgt. Irving Berlin, Dick Bernie, Pvt. Howard Brooks, Marion Brown, Peter J. Burns, Joe Bush, Pvt. Samuel Carr, Pvt. Stewart Churchill, Joe Cook Jr., Pvt. Belmonte Cristiani, Cpl. James A. Cross, Pvt. Louis de Milhau, Ross Elliott, Derek Fairman, Pvt. Ray Goss, Dan Healy, Hank Henry, William Home, Richard Irving, Burl Ives, Fred Kelly, Harold J. Kennedy, Pvt. Robert Kinne, Alan Manson, Pvt. Ralph Margelssen, James McColl, Sgt. John Mendes, Pvt. Gary Merrill, Pvt. Pinkie Mitchell, Robert Moore, John Murphy, Peter O'Neill, Pvt. Jules Oshins, Earl Oxford, Tileston Perry, Pvt. William Pillich, Richard Reeves, Jack Riano, William Roerick, Hayden Rorke, Pfc. Anthony Ross, Louis Salmon, Robert Shanley, Sgt. Robert Sidney, Sgt. Arthur Steiner, Sgt. The Allon Trio, Philip Truex, Norman Van Emburgh, Pvt. Claude Watson, Pvt. Larry Weeks, Pvt. William Wykoff. Produced by Uncle Sam (U.S. Government).
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This film is the only one to star a U.S. President, a U.S. Senator, a state governor and two Presidents of the Screen Actors Guild. Ronald Reagan was President of the U.S. from 1981-1989, Governor of California from 1967-1975 and President of SAG from 1947-1952 and 1959-1960; George Murphy was Senator from California 1965-1971 and President of SAG 1944-1946. They filmed the movie prior to having been elected to any of the offices mentioned.
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Film debut of Hayden Rorke.
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Final film of Dolores Costello.
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Film debut of Henry Jones.
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The Associated Press reported on 11 July 1944 that the film had been banned by government censors in Eire, said Robert Schless, New York head of the Warner Bros. foreign department. Schless said that the government gave no reason for the action but added that he presumed it was because the film was "too unneutral." (San Bernardino Daily Sun, San Bernardino, California, Wednesday 12 July 1944, Volume 50, page 4.)
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