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What-No Beer? (1933) Poster

(1933)

Trivia

Most contemporary promotional items, reviews, and news items punctuate the film's title as What! No Beer?, but the on-screen title is punctuated as What-No Beer?.
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Because of the losses caused by Buster Keaton on his previous film, Speak Easily (1932), MGM production head Irving Thalberg insisted Keaton sign a new contract, docking his salary of $3,000 per week 20% until the $33,000 was paid back to the studio.
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Buster Keaton disappeared during production and married his "sobriety nurse" Mae Scriven during a drunken fling in Mexico.
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Keaton's final film for MGM and his last starring role in the U.S. He would go on to make numerous shorts, appear on television, as well as perform as a character in other films.
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The unusual, large employee time clock in the brewery was made by the International Time Recording Company (which became IBM in 1929) circa 1910-12. It came in different models to accommodate up to 150 employees. It was a spring-driven clock with a huge cast iron wheel. The rim of the wheel was perforated with numbered holes. Each employee would rotate the pointer to their assigned number and press in. The machine would then record the time on a printed form and ring a bell. A two-colored ribbon printed "regular time" in green and all early, late and overtime in red. One of these units is on exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.
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This film's initial television broadcast in New York City took place Monday 16 December 1957 on WCBS (Channel 2); it was first telecast in Philadelphia 3 October 1958 on WFIL (Channel 6) followed by San Francisco 17 December 1958 on KGO (Channel 7). Apparently, because of its age and reputation, Los Angeles television viewers never had a chance at it at this time, since there's no reliable documentation it was ever shown by KTTV (Channel 11), who then had access to the MGM film library.
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Daily Variety in its February 3, 1933 review of the film in preview states the running time was 86 minutes - so many cuts were made before the final print was released.
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The $10,000 Elmer says he has saved would equate to over $191,000 in 2017.
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