Indie News

Sean Penn to Direct, Star in ‘Flag Day’ With Daughter Dylan Penn

  • Variety
Sean Penn to Direct, Star in ‘Flag Day’ With Daughter Dylan Penn
Sean Penn is set to direct and star in the conman drama “Flag Day” alongside his daughter Dylan Penn, his son Hopper Penn, Josh Brolin and Miles Teller.

The cast includes two-time Tony Award winner Norbert Leo Butz (“Fosse/Verdon”), Dale Dickey, Eddie Marsan, Bailey Noble, and Katheryn Winnick (“Vikings”).

Jez Butterworth (“Edge of Tomorrow”) wrote the screenplay, which is based on Jennifer Vogel’s 2005 memoir “Flim-Flam Man: The True Story of My Father’s Counterfeit Life.” “Flag Day” is described an illuminating portrait of a daughter struggling to overcome the loving yet dark legacy of her conman father.

Producers are William Horberg, Jon Kilik and Fernando Sulichin. Production companies are Wonderful Films, Rahway Road, New Element Films and Clyde Is Hungry Films.

Rocket Science and Wild Bunch will executive produce and are handling international sales, with CAA Media Finance, which arranged financing for the film, representing the U.S. and China rights.
See full article at Variety »

‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’: First Reactions Promise Another Entertaining Marvel Hit

‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’: First Reactions Promise Another Entertaining Marvel Hit
Another day, another Marvel success. The Kevin Feige train keeps rolling and very few mistakes aside, the Marvel domination continues. This time its “Spider-Man: Far From Home,” the first post “Avengers: Endgame” film and while we won’t post spoilers in case you haven’t seen the trailers, the Spidey movie deals with all the ramifications of that film.

Early reactions from the film, again, directed by “Spider-Man: Homecoming” filmmaker Jon Watts, are in and they are glowing.

Continue reading ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’: First Reactions Promise Another Entertaining Marvel Hit at The Playlist.
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From ‘Chernobyl’ to ‘Wild Rose,’ Jessie Buckley Is the Star You Can’t Stop Watching

From ‘Chernobyl’ to ‘Wild Rose,’ Jessie Buckley Is the Star You Can’t Stop Watching
Jessie Buckley is having what is popularly known as A Moment, that cultural curiosity when an actor seems to appear from nowhere to star in all of the most interesting projects, all at once. In HBO’s “Chernobyl”, her performance as Lyudmilla Ignatenko, the pregnant housewife who must bear witness to the horrific radiation poisoning of her fireman husband, keeps being singled out for praise. Soon, those kudos will have to compete with the ones she received at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival premiere of “Wild Rose,” with Buckley in the title role of convict-turned-songbird Rose-Lynn Harlan.

In truth, none of this — not the acting, nor the singing, or even the outsized acclaim — is new. The Killarney-born actress-musician shot out of the gate at age 18 when she came in second on BBC talent show “I’d Do Anything” (belting out the Judy Garland ballad “The Man That Got Away”). “Jessie
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Apple TV+: All the Films and TV Shows Coming to Apple’s Streaming Platform

Apple TV+ is set to launch sometime in the fall and is expected to make a major splash in the increasingly competitive market of video streaming. Though many details about the service are still under wraps, Apple has teased numerous television shows and films from a variety of major Hollywood directors and stars. Though it is unlikely that all of the following shows will be available on the platform when it launches, the diverse array of projects and sheer quanitity of well-known talent involved in various Apple TV+ series suggests that the Cupertino tech giant wants to enter the streaming market on a high note.
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘Operation Pull Toy’ Became the Perfect Prologue for ‘Toy Story 4’

How ‘Operation Pull Toy’ Became the Perfect Prologue for ‘Toy Story 4’
The “Toy Story” sequels are renown for their playful and imaginative prologues: Buzz’s video game battle with General Zurg in “Toy Story 2,” and Andy’s wild, wild West playtime adventure in “Toy Story 3.” Trying to top those for “Toy Story 4,” however, became its own special challenge, given the need to reintroduce Bo Peep and explain her absence from the franchise.

Although the Pixar team went through several fun-filled iterations, they landed on the perfect flashback that not only delivers a thrilling rescue of Rc (Remote Control car) in a rainstorm, but also a bittersweet goodbye between Woody and Bo Peep as she’s passed on to a new child. Best of all, it brilliantly foreshadows their complex journey to come and Woody’s existential crisis, in his choosing to stay with Andy rather than running off with her.

“We went through many versions of what the opening would be,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Rivers of Ink

Daisy Doodad's Dial (1914). Image courtesy of the Library of Congress and Specters of Slapstick and Silent Film Comediennes.CAVEATIn countries without active, functional frameworks to sustain the performance of cinephilia, a cross-generational transmission of an interest in the cinema is attained through traditions that are predominantly oral. Such a mode is—as all communication must be to remain relevant—plagued inevitably by tendencies of exaggeration, fabrication, or myth-making. This is to say that the heirloom of film culture that each successive generation of young cinephiles inherits in these countries is at least, in part, a collection of rumors, a tall-tale, an urban legend—at any rate, an elaborate fiction. In parts of the world therefore, where the conduct of cinephilia relies heavily on how thorough its artifice is, a crisis that is pertinent for the rest of the world—presentation or preservation—is resolved with much ease: presentation is preservation.
See full article at MUBI »

Crossroads Festival: Institutionalizing Risk

A Room with a Coconut ViewThere’s always a pang of irony when noting the milestones accomplished by venerable avant-garde institutions. Some seem to hold fast to the idea that institutionality itself is the enemy of experimentation, and that a “true” avant-garde showcase or entity ought to burn hot, bright, and fast, and then fizzle out before it is invaded by the mundanes. This is the Jack Smith Theory of Art, and while I am certainly sympathetic, I am not a subscriber. I, alas, am much more of an Uncle Fishhook. I compile lists, hoard tapes and digital files, keep manila folders full of old program notes, and generally try to think both historically—noting what develops from the ongoing wreckage of the past—and geometrically—observing how forms and concepts can develop webs of connection through time and across culture and nation. Institutions, or at least archives of one sort or another,
See full article at MUBI »

How Ryan Murphy’s ‘Showrunning As Advocacy’ Led to Janet Mock’s Historic Netflix Deal

How Ryan Murphy’s ‘Showrunning As Advocacy’ Led to Janet Mock’s Historic Netflix Deal
When “Pose” premiered on FX last June, much fanfare was made of the first show starring five transgender women of color, three as leads. Viewers who tuned in found a world as beautiful and moving as Christopher Street, the ballroom, and the runway. From the fiercely protective house mother Blanca (Mj Rodriguez), her spirited child Angel (Indya Moore), and her dripping-with-elegance rival Elektra (Dominique Jackson), the women at the center of “Pose” were able to live and breathe on their own terms, free from any preconceived notions or box-checking of what a trans-femme character should look like. Much of that had to do with the writers, directors, producers, and general talent assembled by “Pose” executive producer — and reigning king of queer Hollywood — Ryan Murphy.

“From the very first conversation I had with Ryan…the first difficult conversation we had was about — ‘Why you? Why are you choosing to do the show?
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ Earns Strong First Reactions, Critics Buzz Over ‘Huge’ McU Surprises

‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ Earns Strong First Reactions, Critics Buzz Over ‘Huge’ McU Surprises
The social media embargo for “Spider-Man: Far From Home” has lifted several weeks before the latest Marvel Cinematic Universe title hits theaters, and fortunately the early buzz is already through the roof. Critics are calling “Far From Home” one of the best Spider-Man movies ever made and the perfect follow-up to the game-changing events of the McU’s last blockbuster, “Avengers: Endgame.”

Tom Holland reprises his role of Spider-Man in “Far From Home,” the actor’s second standalone McU movie after the success of 2017’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming.” The film picks up in a world mourning over the loss of Tony Stark and finds Peter Parker teaming up with Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) to save the world during a European vacation with his classmates. “Homecoming” director Jon Watts is once again behind the camera. The returning cast includes Jacob Battalion and Zendaya.

“‘Spider Man: Far From Home’ is wonderful,” IndieWire’s Deputy Editor-Film Kate Erbland writes.
See full article at Indiewire »

Venom and Spider-Man Crossover Movie ‘Seems Likely,’ Teases McU Boss Kevin Feige

Venom and Spider-Man Crossover Movie ‘Seems Likely,’ Teases McU Boss Kevin Feige
Comic book movie fans hoping Tom Hardy’s Venom and Tom Holland’s Spider-Man get the chance to share the big screen are in luck as Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige says a crossover movie “seems likely” in the future. Sony Pictures owns the rights to the Spider-Man and Venom characters and has found financial success in sharing the former with Disney in order for the character to appear in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. McU fans have been hopeful Venom might crossover as well, though neither studio has confirmed the move yet.

“I think probably it’s up to Sony,” Feige said when asked about a potential crossover by CinemaBlend. “Sony has both those characters and has Venom in their world. I don’t know what their plans are for another ‘Venom’ or if they’re doing that. But it seems likely at some point.”

Sony’s “Venom” was released
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Can Marvel’s ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Catch Up to ‘Avatar’ Worldwide Box Office With Re-Release?

Can Marvel’s ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Catch Up to ‘Avatar’ Worldwide Box Office With Re-Release?
Inevitably, not long after “Avengers: Endgame” co-director Joe Russo said it didn’t matter if the film fell just shy of the “Avatar” record for (unadjusted) worldwide gross, Disney is returning the film to theaters on June 28. Their excuse? Marvel is adding new footage, including an unspecified tribute. Clearly, Marvel wants to beat James Cameron in the battle of the numbers.

Through Monday, “Endgame” has grossed $831.17 million domestic and $1.91 billon foreign, for a total of $2.74 billion. That compares to $2.79 reached by “Avatar,” mostly in 2010 during its initial release. This past weekend “Endgame” took in about $3.7 million (landing #10), foreign $2.1 million.

So that leaves “Endgame” $45 million short. Finally, comparing accumulated film grosses at today’s ticket prices with lower ones for earlier releases is nonsense. The whole competitive exercise serves mainly to satisfy various egos, on the one hand, and to feed a fanbase desire to be #1. The best adjusted gauge –a
See full article at Indiewire »

Give Me Blockbusters or Give Me Death: Here’s What’s Really Behind the Box-Office Collapse

Give Me Blockbusters or Give Me Death: Here’s What’s Really Behind the Box-Office Collapse
Help is on the way this weekend. Although domestic theaters are down more than 7%, or about $430 million, compared to 2018, this weekend is “Toy Story 4,” which is expected to open to $150 million or more; two weeks later it’s another nine-figure opening with “Spider-Man: Far from Home,” followed by “The Lion King” and “Hobbs & Shaw.”

This is great news, but here’s the catch: Box office still has a problem — actually, several — and they have little to do with sequels.

Sequel problem? What sequel problem?

If you’re “Toy Story 4,” there’s no problem at all: Its history as one of the most beloved animated properties of all time is a feature, not a bug. But if you’re “Men in Black: International,” “Shaft,” “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” or “Dark Phoenix,” it’s a very different story. While these films were hits in their initial iterations, each of
See full article at Indiewire »

As Emmy Voting Nears End, Who Will Represent in Comedy and Drama?

  • Indiewire
It’s only a matter of days until voting for the 2019 Emmy nominations comes to an end, meaning this is the last chance for the entire field of eligible shows to make a valiant argument as to why they deserve distinction among their peers.

This week’s Screen Talk Emmy Edition tackles the best of the rest, looking at the fields of comedy, drama, documentary, and variety, as well as at the performances that define them. IndieWire Editor-at-Large Anne Thompson and TV Awards Editor Libby Hill discuss the how dearth of quality dramas, as well as an overcrowded comedy category, have potential to result in an unpredictable batch of nominees.

In the process, the pair takes special care to note which shows remain dominant, which shows have heat and which might be left out in the cold. Tune in to find out which documentary Thompson is certain has that category
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Yellowstone’ Review: Season 2 Still Hasn’t Figured Out How to Trust Its Own Strengths

For a show that spends so much of its time weighing the consequences of the pain that humans can cause themselves, each other, and the world around them, “Yellowstone” can be pretty funny when it wants to be.

It’s one example of how, when the Paramount Network series hits pause on its tortured meditations on political power and leaden family drama, there’s a wealth of potential that lies just beneath the surface. Season 2 returns with a slightly better understanding of what it can do within its confines, but this is still a show with a mammoth to-do list. It’s a size befitting of the wide-open backdrop it’s set against and one that leads to a still-overstuffed drama of all kinds, even if more of it clicks after some time away.

Co-creator and writer Taylor Sheridan first took the reins of this ongoing saga of the Duttons
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‘Midsommar’: Ari Aster Tackles Grief, Gaslighting & Cults In A Folk Horror About The Relationships You Need To Leave, Asap [Review]

‘Midsommar’: Ari Aster Tackles Grief, Gaslighting & Cults In A Folk Horror About The Relationships You Need To Leave, Asap [Review]
Plumbing the depths of his dysfunction, filmmaker Ari Aster generated an unbearable tension with his icy family horror debut “Hereditary.” By way of “Ordinary People,” and the moody chilliness of Ingmar Bergman, that immaculately crafted, meditative arthouse horror—a 2018 breakout Sundance hit— immediately transformed Aster’s career, turning him into horror auteur to watch. Turning once more to his traumas, a painful break up, Aster’s follow-up film, “Midsommar,” is ambitious, aesthetically gorgeous and freakish, but much like Jordan Peele—a contemporary director that hit a home run the first time at bat, but stumbled a bit with his impressive, but muddled, follow-up swing—his sophomore effort is disarrayed and lacking the emotional intensity of his debut.

Continue reading ‘Midsommar’: Ari Aster Tackles Grief, Gaslighting & Cults In A Folk Horror About The Relationships You Need To Leave, Asap [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Jim Carrey on ‘Kidding,’ Cartoons, and Building a ‘Life Raft’ for People in Pain

Jim Carrey on ‘Kidding,’ Cartoons, and Building a ‘Life Raft’ for People in Pain
Right now, Jim Carrey is happy. Sitting on the set of “Kidding” Season 2, he’s just finished an “awesome” sequence that made him feel “like I’m just happy to be alive.”

But Carrey knows that feeling can’t last forever. Sure, he’s going to enjoy playing in the vast creative space of his Showtime series, and more good things will come after it. But Carrey said clinging to happiness at all times is an irrational impossibility; something fabricated on TV, and something he’s not interested in propagating himself.

“We try to put as good a face on as as we can, and sometimes we actually experience real unfettered joy,” he said. “But to try to hold that joy and freeze it in time and have it never be anything else is a lie. It can never happen for anyone. […] Last night, I was sitting outside and I had a tangible feeling of,
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Telluride Film Festival 2019 Ramps Up with Guest Director Pico Iyer

Telluride Film Festival 2019 Ramps Up with Guest Director Pico Iyer
If you were thinking of attending this year’s annual Labor Day weekend cinephile celebration high in the Rocky Mountains, it’s too late. Coveted passes to the 46th Telluride Film Festival sold out months ago, and the Los Angeles charter flights to Montrose, Colorado are booked.

Every year the Telluride Film Festival welcomes a new round of filmmakers and cinephiles seeking mutual satisfaction. And it marks the real start of the Oscar conversation. Sure, Sundance launched “The Farewell,” “The Report,” and “Clemency” and a raft of strong documentaries, and Cannes yielded “Rocketman” and “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and a rich crop of likely foreign-language contenders. But all these films must withstand a powerful riptide of Oscar-bound movies with massive awards campaigns behind them. Distributors don’t head for Telluride if they aren’t confident that their entries will emerge with buzz and momentum heading into Toronto.

Some
See full article at Indiewire »

Wes Anderson’s Best Shots: 25 Perfect Images That Define His Career

Wes Anderson’s Best Shots: 25 Perfect Images That Define His Career
Over the last 23 years and counting, Wes Anderson and Robert Yeoman have been one of cinema’s most essential director-cinematographer pairings. The filmmaking duo has crafted a signature style that has made Anderson one of the most recognizable auteurs in film history. One look at the frame is all it takes to know you’re watching a Wes Anderson film, whether it’s the hyper-stylized set design, the meticulous symmetry of a composition, or the precision of lateral camera movements.

Anderson currently has 10 feature films under his belt, and he’s currently at work on his tenth thanks to the upcoming “The French Dispatch.” IndieWire looks back at the filmmaker’s legendary career below in 25 perfect shots.
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Rachel Morrison to Make Directorial Debut on Barry Jenkins-Penned True-Life Boxing Drama

Rachel Morrison to Make Directorial Debut on Barry Jenkins-Penned True-Life Boxing Drama
Oscar-nominated cinematographer Rachel Morrison is making another big move behind the camera, as Variety reports that the “Black Panther” and “Mudbound” talent is in negotiations to make her feature directorial debut. The project in question would make a strong fit for Morrison: it’s a true-life boxing drama that was penned by Oscar-winner Barry Jenkins and follows the story of 17-year-old Claressa “T-Rex” Shields.

Shields’ life was already put on the screen thanks to the 2015 boxing documentary “T-rex” directed by Zackary Canepari and Drea Cooper. The new project will further follow the “Flint, Mich., native whose dreams of becoming the first woman in history to win an Olympic gold medal in boxing were realized at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. At the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, Shields won a second gold medal in women’s middleweight boxing.”

The project is now going by the title “Flint Strong,” and will be
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscar-Nominated Cinematographer Rachel Morrison To Make Feature Directorial Debut With ‘Flint Strong’ From Writer Barry Jenkins

Oscar-Nominated Cinematographer Rachel Morrison To Make Feature Directorial Debut With ‘Flint Strong’ From Writer Barry Jenkins
It’s only a matter of time for a cinematographer of a certain caliber to get offered a major film to direct. In the case of Rachel Morrison, the Oscar-nominated cinematographer, she’s ready to make the jump to the director’s chair after being behind the camera for some truly impressive films.

According to Variety, Morrison has signed on to direct the film “Flint Strong,” making the project her directorial debut.

Continue reading Oscar-Nominated Cinematographer Rachel Morrison To Make Feature Directorial Debut With ‘Flint Strong’ From Writer Barry Jenkins at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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