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Telemundo Names Vanessa Hauc Weekend Anchor

  • Variety
Telemundo Names Vanessa Hauc Weekend Anchor
Telemundo viewers are about to see a familiar face in a new role.

Vanessa Hauc, a veteran correspondent at the NBCUniversal-owned Spanish-language network, will take over as weekend anchor for Telemundo Weekend News, starting Saturday. She takes over from Julio Vaqueiro, who was recently named anchor of a new late-night newscast that is being launched as part of a broader initiative to cover the coronavirus outbreak.

The move illustrates how quickly some news organizations are working to reorient themselves as they face the tough task of covering a fast-changing news cycle where accurate information is of paramount importance to consumers. Telemundo has also announced extended news segments centered on coronavirus news for its daytime schedule.

“Our community is relying on us to keep them provided with information,” says Hauc, who served as a moderator during NBCUniversal’s recent broadcast of the February 19 Democratic debate from Las Vegas, in an interview.
See full article at Variety »

How Religions Are Adapting to Coronavirus

How Religions Are Adapting to Coronavirus
At this point, Covid-19 has infiltrated many aspects of our lives, including how we practice religion. Changes to religious services started earlier this month in various parts of the United States with confirmed cases of Covid-19, including New York City, Seattle and Washington, D.C. Religious gatherings, of course, get people close to each other — from sharing communion to kissing the Torah — giving the virus an opportunity to infect more people.

An Episcopal rector became the first confirmed case of Covid-19 in Washington, D.C. — after he participated in services with about 550 people,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The New Pope’: Paolo Sorrentino on Jude Law’s Return and His ‘Crazy’ Idea for Another Season

‘The New Pope’: Paolo Sorrentino on Jude Law’s Return and His ‘Crazy’ Idea for Another Season
Don’t be alarmed. Yes, those keeping up with “The New Pope” are now looking at Lenny Belardo, the so-called young pope played by Jude Law, alive and in the flesh. Yes, there’s a lot of flesh, since he’s only wearing white swim briefs, and yes, he’s wet and winking. Doubt, if you must, his impossible fitness — after being comatose for a year, only divine intervention could maintain those abs — but do not doubt what matters most: He is risen.

After six episodes of spiritual apparitions and twitching fingers, Lenny finally woke from his 12-month coma. But one of the most notable scenes, and certainly the most internet famous, takes place in between the land of the living and the world of the dead. Jude Law’s beachside emergence — the one that kicks off the episode, and yes, the one used in early promos for “The New Pope
See full article at Indiewire »

Vix Adds A Faith-Based Channel To Its Avod Ott Streaming App, Including Paulist Productions Library

  • Deadline
Vix Adds A Faith-Based Channel To Its Avod Ott Streaming App, Including Paulist Productions Library
Exclusive: Hispanic-focused content company VIx has added a faith-based channel to its free Avod Ott streaming app, headlined by films from the extensive Paulist Productions library.

The faith-based content will be added to the film and TV content currently offered on the Avod service.

Paulist Productions is the 60-year old, non-profit media fund and production company founded by Catholic priest Fr. Ellwood “Bud” Kieser, who is also the founder of the Humantis Prize. Paulist’s library of films and TV shows includes over 500 hours of content, including the remastered Raul Julia-starrer Romero, recounting the story of the recently-canonized saint Fr. Oscar Romero; The Fourth Wise Man, starring Martin Sheen, Alan Arkin, Eileen Brennan and Ralph Bellamy; and Christmas films such as The Juggler of Notre Dame.

Vix acquired Avod Ott company Pongalo last August to expand its touchpoints with its existing Hispanic audiences. Vix’s global streaming service is
See full article at Deadline »

Best Actor Joaquin Phoenix (‘Joker’) detours from the decade’s trend of biopic Oscar winners

Best Actor Joaquin Phoenix (‘Joker’) detours from the decade’s trend of biopic Oscar winners
As a new decade has dawned, it is a good time to take a look back at an Oscar trend that became firmly entrenched when it comes to leading men. Namely, the majority of brand-name top-billed actors who have claimed an Academy Award over the past 10 years portrayed real people. Biopics and truth-based stories have been the rage of late, perhaps feeding our hunger for heroes from the past or capitalizing on our addiction for 24-hour cable news.

This embrace of real-life characters began to take hold in the 2000s, starting with Adrien Brody in 2002’s “The Pianist,” Jamie Foxx in 2004’s “Ray,” Philip Seymour Hoffman in 2005’s “Capote,” Forest Whitaker in 2006’s “The Last King of Scotland” and Sean Penn in 2008’s “Milk.”

See Joaquin Phoenix movies: 13 greatest films ranked worst to best

As for this decade, seven out of 10 Best Actor winners came from biopics: Colin Firth in 2010’s “The King’s Speech,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘The Two Popes’: For Oscar-Nominated Biopics, Screenwriter Anthony McCarten Is Your Man

‘The Two Popes’: For Oscar-Nominated Biopics, Screenwriter Anthony McCarten Is Your Man
The Two Popes” is Anthony McCarten’s third Academy Award nomination as a screenwriter, all for true stories: He was nominated for “The Theory of Everything,” which focused on the domestic life of Als-frozen physicist Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) and his wife Jane (Felicity Jones), and Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman) facing war in “Darkest Hour.” Although “The Two Popes” is in the Adapted Screenplay category, all were self generated: It’s based on McCarten’s own play.

McCarten was visiting St. Peter’s Square with his wife when he started wondering about how this was “the first time in 500 years that we have two popes living,” he said. He started writing a screenplay, a stage play, and a novel, and his agents sent him to pitch the idea to studio executives. The first batch didn’t warm to a film about ideas that starred two old men. But
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Two Popes’: For Oscar-Nominated Biopics, Screenwriter Anthony McCarten Is Your Man

  • Indiewire
‘The Two Popes’: For Oscar-Nominated Biopics, Screenwriter Anthony McCarten Is Your Man
The Two Popes” is Anthony McCarten’s third Academy Award nomination as a screenwriter, all for true stories: He was nominated for “The Theory of Everything,” which focused on the domestic life of Als-frozen physicist Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) and his wife Jane (Felicity Jones), and Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman) facing war in “Darkest Hour.” Although “The Two Popes” is in the Adapted Screenplay category, all were self generated: It’s based on McCarten’s own play.

McCarten was visiting St. Peter’s Square with his wife when he started wondering about how this was “the first time in 500 years that we have two popes living,” he said. He started writing a screenplay, a stage play, and a novel, and his agents sent him to pitch the idea to studio executives. The first batch didn’t warm to a film about ideas that starred two old men. But
See full article at Indiewire »

A Look at the Real People Who Inspired These Oscar-Nominated Films

A Look at the Real People Who Inspired These Oscar-Nominated Films
Judy Garland. Fred Rodgers. Jimmy Hoffa. Pope Francis.  Those are just a smattering of names who could very well be receiving a shout-out during the 2020 Oscars this Sunday. I mean, it's likely that Renee Zellweger, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino and Jonathan Pryce would thank their people first, the cadre of agents, managers, publicists, directors, producers and cinematographers who keep their careers humming along, plus the spouses, partners, children and close friends that make up their support groups.  But, then, yeah, they'll probably be expressing their gratitude to the real-life people they portrayed for having an existence rich enough to really pop on screen.  Because...
See full article at E! Online »

Myriad Pictures to launch Efm sales on faith-based drama ‘Fatima’

Picturehouse to release in North America in April.

Myriad Pictures has picked up international sales on faith-based drama Fatima starring Stephanie Gil, Lúcia Moniz, Joaquim de Almeida, Goran Visnjic, Sonia Braga and Harvey Keitel and will launch sales at Efm this month.

Bob and Jeanne Berney’s revived distribution label Picturehouse will release the drama in North America on April 24 on more than 1,000 screens.

Marco Pontecorvo directed from a screenplay he co-wrote with Valerio D’Annunzio and Barbara Nicolosi based on historical events about a 10-year-old shepherd and her two young cousins in Fátima, Portugal, who report seeing visions of the Virgin Mary.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Two Popes' Screenwriter Breaks Down Challenges of Finding the Truth: It's "Not a Fixed, Finite Thing"

In Netflix's The Two Popes, screenwriter Anthony McCarten expertly choreographs a complex verbal dance between Pope Benedict XVI and Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires who would become his successor, Pope Francis. The intense and intellectual debate about the role of God and the church that takes place over the course of several days is a dialogue, let alone a premise, that even McCarten admits is presumptuous. "I'm speculating on what these two highly intelligent, articulate men might have said to each other in the privacy of these rooms," he says. "Even the idea ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Hollywood’s Long History With Real-Life Characters Leads to Oscars

  • Variety
Hollywood’s Long History With Real-Life Characters Leads to Oscars
Since 2000, slightly more than half the lead actor and actress Oscars (21 out of 38) have gone to portrayals of real-life individuals. It’s a bias that dates back to George Arliss and “Disraeli” (1929), although award-winning impersonations have become increasingly stark, even critical, in the latter years.

Notwithstanding Oliver Cromwell’s plea to “Paint me as I am, warts and all!,” early Hollywood awarded acting honors to a near-dozen respectful, even adoring bio-pics. Arliss turned the moody, depressive Disraeli into a matchmaking Dutch uncle. Charles Laughton went cute, not cruel, as Henry VIII. Paul Muni sidestepped Louis Pasteur’s alleged data tampering, just as James Cagney’s George M. Cohan in 1942 ignored the opposition to Actors’ Equity that earned Cohan actors’ enmity.

Honoring real-life subjects virtually dried up for the next 40 years, with the rare exceptions going easy on the likes of George Patton, Thomas More, Fanny Brice and Annie Sullivan. (Who
See full article at Variety »

Oscars: Every man who won Best Actor for playing a real life person

Oscars: Every man who won Best Actor for playing a real life person
Oscar voters have proven over and over that they love actors who portray historic people. Maybe it’s because they can make easy comparisons. Or maybe it’s because they are often heroic figures. Whatever the reason, it’s been happening since the very beginning. Tour our photo gallery of every single man who has won the Best Actor category at the Academy Awards for playing a true life character.

The very first person to win the illustrious prize for stepping into a real person’s shoes was George Arliss, who portrayed former British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli in the biopic “Disraeli” (1929). Arliss was only the third Best Actor winner in history, and in those early days of the Oscars, Academy rules allowed performers to be nominated for more than one film in the same category. This allowed the actor to contend for his role as the Raja in “The Green Goddess” as well.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars tragedy: ‘The Two Popes’ was likely 10th place for Best Picture nom, say 48% of readers [Poll Results]

  • Gold Derby
Oscars tragedy: ‘The Two Popes’ was likely 10th place for Best Picture nom, say 48% of readers [Poll Results]
Did “The Two Popes” just miss out on a Best Picture Oscar nomination? That’s what a leading 48% of readers believe who voted in our our recent poll. You see, Academy Awards voters are allowed to nominate 10 movies for Best Picture, but this year they decided only to recognize nine: “Ford v Ferrari,” “The Irishman,” “Jojo Rabbit,” “Joker,” “Little Women,” “Marriage Story,” “1917,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and “Parasite.” Had they nominated the maximum, our readers think “The Two Popes” would have nabbed that 10th slot. Talk about a true Oscars tragedy!

See 2020 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

In 2011 the academy changed the number of Best Picture nominees to be a sliding scale between five and 10, but since then only eight or nine have been recognized each year. Per the Oscars rule book, in order to be nominated a movie must earn 5% of first-place rankings.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Has the Pope Seen The Two Popes? Jonathan Pryce Says a Cardinal Asked for a DVD for Francis

Has the Pope Seen The Two Popes? Jonathan Pryce Says a Cardinal Asked for a DVD for Francis
Jonathan Pryce and Anthony Hopkins both earned Oscar nominations this week for their acclaimed Netflix movie The Two Popes — but what do the two popes themselves think?

Neither Pope Francis nor the retired Pope Benedict XVI has officially reacted to the film. But Pryce, who plays Pope Francis in the Netflix film, tells People in this week’s issue Vatican officials reacted warmly to the movie and requested a DVD for the current pontiff.

“We had a screening in Rome about three or four weeks ago now to which members of the Vatican were invited,” says Pryce. “We spoke to
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Biopic whiz Anthony McCarten (‘The Two Popes’) strikes again with Oscar bids for adapted screenplay and its papal actors

Biopic whiz Anthony McCarten (‘The Two Popes’) strikes again with Oscar bids for adapted screenplay and its papal actors
One of the least shocking Oscar nominations on Monday should have been for writer Anthony McCarten‘s adapted screenplay (based on his stage production) for Netflix’s “The Two Popes” and the matching set of lead and supporting bids for Jonathan Pryce as the future Pope Francis and Anthony Hopkins as the soon-to-retire Pope Benedict.

McCarten has been a secret wordsmith weapon at the Academy Awards with a knack for writing biopic scripts that seem to inevitably become the source of a male lead taking home a trophy. It started with 2014’s “The Theory of Everything” about astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, which led to his first adapted screenplay bid and a producer nomination for the Best Picture. As for the film’s star Eddie Redmayne, he ended up taking home the Best Actor prize.

SEEBiopic screenwriter supreme Anthony McCarten: ‘I am drawn to projects that combine the intimate and the epic.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2020: Best Actor Predictions

Oscars 2020: Best Actor Predictions
In the competitive field of Best Actor contenders, Oscar-winner Leonardo DiCaprio (“The Revenant”) contends with rising star Adam Driver as well as long overdue veterans Antonio Banderas and Joaquin Phoenix.

Driver’s strong performances in “The Report” and “Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker” support his first shot at a Best Actor Oscar with Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story” –which earned raves on the fall festival circuit — in which he and Scarlett Johansson play a couple dealing with a fractious divorce.

Spanish Oscar-winner Pedro Almodóvar (“All About My Mother”) launched at Cannes his auto-fiction “Pain & Glory” (Sony Pictures Classics), starring regular muse Banderas as an aging filmmaker looking back on his life. Banderas gives a moving, intimate performance unlike anything else he has ever done; his Best Actor win at Cannes marked a strong start on the road to his first Oscar nomination. Critics have backed him, but he missed SAG and BAFTA nods.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscars 2020: Best Actor Predictions

Oscars 2020: Best Actor Predictions
In the competitive field of Best Actor contenders, Oscar-winner Leonardo DiCaprio (“The Revenant”) contends with rising star Adam Driver as well as long overdue veterans Antonio Banderas and Joaquin Phoenix.

Driver’s strong performances in “The Report” and “Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker” support his first shot at a Best Actor Oscar with Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story” –which earned raves on the fall festival circuit — in which he and Scarlett Johansson play a couple dealing with a fractious divorce.

Spanish Oscar-winner Pedro Almodóvar (“All About My Mother”) launched at Cannes his auto-fiction “Pain & Glory” (Sony Pictures Classics), starring regular muse Banderas as an aging filmmaker looking back on his life. Banderas gives a moving, intimate performance unlike anything else he has ever done; his Best Actor win at Cannes marked a strong start on the road to his first Oscar nomination. Critics have backed him, but he missed SAG and BAFTA nods.
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars 2020: Where to Watch the Nominees

David Crow Jan 14, 2020

From The Irishman to Parasite, we round up where you can watch all the Oscar nominees available for streaming and digital download.

The Oscar nominees for the 92nd Academy Awards have been announced, and 2019 has been an impressively strong year for film. You don’t have to look much further than Bong Joon-ho’s meditation on class and capitalism in Parasite, or Quentin Tarantino’s groovy romancing of Hollywood days gone by, to appreciate the mostly strong quality amongst the nominees this year, big and small. Here’s where you can watch many of them on streaming services.

The Irishman

A good place to start is with Netflix’s frontrunner for Best Picture. More than just a prestige project from a streaming service though, The Irishman is a beautiful and brittle eulogy offered by Martin Scorsese toward his legacy—and a final, exacting judgment on the gangsters and wiseguys associated with it.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Which film likely came in 10th place for Best Picture Oscar: ‘Bombshell,’ ‘The Two Popes,’ ‘Knives Out’ or … ? [Poll]

  • Gold Derby
Which film likely came in 10th place for Best Picture Oscar: ‘Bombshell,’ ‘The Two Popes,’ ‘Knives Out’ or … ? [Poll]
When the 2020 Oscar nominations were announced on Monday, nine movies were sitting pretty as the year’s Best Picture nominees: “Ford v Ferrari,” “The Irishman,” “Jojo Rabbit,” “Joker,” “Little Women,” “Marriage Story,” “1917,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and “Parasite.” But which film likely came in 10th place? In 2011 the Academy Awards changed the number of Best Picture nominees to be a sliding scale between five and 10, with either eight or nine being nominated ever since. Of this year’s notable also-rans, vote in our poll below to let us know which one You think was #10 on Oscar voters’ ballots.

Based on Gold Derby’s racetrack odds, the film with the best chance of getting into 10th place was “Knives Out.” The Rian Johnson-directed whodunit earned an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay, but that’s it. None of its sprawling cast members (including leads Daniel Craig and
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2020: Best Adapted Screenplay Predictions

As always, the crowded Adapted Screenplay category ranges over source material from novels and plays to magazine articles. And late-inning eligibility changes can move some originals to adapted, and vice versa.

New Zealand transplant Christine Leunens wrote the award-winning 2004 Vienna-set Hitler Youth novel “Caging Skies,” which was turned into a 2017 New Zealand hit play, and now, Taika Waititi’s black satire “Jojo Rabbit” (Fox Searchlight), which won the Toronto International Film Festival’s People’s Choice award. This light-hearted but serious fable stars Roman Griffin Davis as a lonely young Nazi enthusiast whose imaginary friend Hitler (Waititi) winds up fighting for dominance with a young Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie) hidden by his activist mother (Scarlett Johansson) behind a wall in his house.

Oscar-nominated writer-director Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”) adapted “Little Women” (Sony), the Louisa May Alcott classic about a mother (Laura Dern) with limited means raising four daughters while her husband is away at war.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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