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Crypt of Curiosities: The Short Films of Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani

For my money, Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani are two of the best genre directors working today. Their two feature-length gialli, Amer (2009) and The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears (2014) are among the greatest "throwback" films of all-time, taking the vocabulary and iconography of the giallo and twisting it into something new and exciting, all while playing with the cinematic form with a barrage of close-ups, split screens, and Chris Marker-esque jump-cut slideshows. The only downside is that, as of the time of this writing, only the aforementioned gialli are available for viewing, while their latest film, Let the Corpses Tan, won’t be released stateside until this summer. So what’s a fan of hyper-stylized neo-gialli to do? Why, turn to their shorts, of course!

Like many filmmakers, Cattet and Forzani honed the aesthetic they’d use in their later films through their early shorts. Unlike all filmmakers,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Best Movie Fight Scenes — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Movie Fight Scenes — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of the bone-crunching “Atomic Blonde,” what is the greatest movie fight scene?

Read More‘Atomic Blonde’: How They Turned One Amazing Action Scene Into a Seven-Minute Long Take Erin Oliver Whitney (@cinemabite), ScreenCrush

I’ve got a soft spot for wuxia so the “best fight scene” immediately evokes Zhang Yimou in my mind. I could list every fight in “Hero,” sequences so spellbindingly beautiful and graceful you forget you’re watching violence. The bamboo forest battle from “House of Flying Daggers” is another all-timer, a mesmerizing fight that almost entirely takes place in the air. And the bone-crunching, table-smashing
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: "My Name Is Nobody" (1973) Starring Terence Hill And Henry Fonda; Blu-ray Release From Image

  • CinemaRetro
By John Lemay

My Name is Nobody is many things: a 1973 spoof of the “young and old gunslingers” sub-genre that began with For a Few Dollars More; Henry Fonda’s last Western (and Sergio Leone’s to an extent); and even a eulogy on the dying of the Spaghetti Western itself. Spearheaded by Sergio Leone himself, Nobody was directed by Tonino Valerii (Day of Anger) and teams Once Upon a Time in the West’s Henry Fonda with They Call Me Trinity’s Terence Hill. As a combo of Leone’s straight westerns and Hill’s “Beans Westerns” (a slang term for comedic Spaghettis) it amounts to quite the crossover film and could’ve easily been called “Once Upon A Time in the West They Called Me Trinity.” While it is never as funny as Hill’s two Trinity films or as epic as Leone’s “horse operas” it is
See full article at CinemaRetro »

‘Day of Anger’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Lee Van Cleef, Giuliano Gemma, Walter Rilla, Christa Linder, Yvonne Sanson, Lukas Ammann, Andrea Bosic, Ennio Balbo, José Calvo, Giorgio Gargiullo | Written by Ernesto Gastaldi, Tonino Valerii, Renzo Genta | Directed by Tonino Valerii

When it comes to cult Italian movies we tend to know them for two things, horror and the Spaghetti Western. This is probably why Arrow Video looked to the western for one of their latest releases with Day of Anger. Starring Lee Van Cleef who had somewhat of a career comeback with the Italian westerns is it about time to take another look at this movie?

Scott Mary (Giuliano Gemma) is at the bottom of the social ladder in the perfect little town of Clifton. Bullied and made to do the jobs like cleaning out the toilets, picking up trash and sweeping the floors he dreams of a better life. When an ageing gunfighter Frank Talby
See full article at Nerdly »

Day of Anger | Blu-ray Review

In the enduring, boundless shadow of Sergio Leone’s legacy, a deluge of neglected and forgotten Italian genre titles languish undeservedly, ready for rediscovery. Arrow Video has dusted off a masterful example long overdue, Tonino Valerii’s 1967 sophomore feature, Day of Anger (aka Gunlaw). Valerii worked as Leone’s assistant on A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More before launching his own directorial career, re-fashioning the villainous energy of Lee Van Cleef in the actor’s effort to break out on his own. Scripted by Italian genre regular Ernesto Gastaldi (who worked with many masters of giallo film, including Mario Bava, and Sergio Martino), the overtly familiar narrative does little to hamper the enjoyable performances of Van Cleef and Giuliano Gemma, replete with several memorable action sequences and set pieces that assist in elevating the title to its deserved reputation.

Lowly street cleaner Scott Mary (Giuliano Gemma
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The 20 Best Spaghetti Westerns, According To Quentin Tarantino

No one likes making a list more than Quentin Tarantino. The beloved filmmaker annually updates his fans with his favorite movies of the past 12 months, while he also enjoys amassing lists of his most cherished films from throughout history as well. In fact, the Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, and Kill Bill director has even gone as far as to list his favorites of the Spaghetti Western genre - and you probably won.t be surprised about what came out on top. Tarantino revealed his list to Spaghetti-Western.net, and you can have a gander at his choices below: 1. The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (Sergio Leone, 1966) 2. For A Few Dollars More (Sergio Leone, 1965) 3. Django (Sergio Corbucci, 1966) 4. The Mercenary (Sergio Corbucci, 1968) 5. Once Upon A Time In The West (Sergio Leone, 1968) 6. A Fistful Of Dollars (Sergio Leone, 1964) 7. Day Of Anger (Tonino Valerii, 1967) 8. Death Rides A Horse (Giulio Petroni, 1967) 9. Navajo Joe (Sergio
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Quentin Tarantino Lists His Top 20 Spaghetti Westerns of All Time

When I first heard about this list this morning I could have sworn it was old news, but as it turns out, this list of Quentin Tarantino's top 20 spaghetti westerns is a new thing as presented to us bt Spaghetti-Western.net. What I must have been thinking of was a list of spaghetti westerns that influenced Tarantino's Django Unchained, some of which are repeated here such as Sergio Corbucci's The Great Silence (read an essay I wrote on this one here) and the obvious, Django, and Giulio Petroni's Death Rides a Horse. However, this list is more than that and more than just Sergio Leone and Corbucci titles, though those two do make up eight of the twenty films on Tarantino's list. I haven't looked to see how many of the more obscure titles listed here are available on Netflix, but I have a feeling now that
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

"Day Of Anger", "Blind Woman's Curse" and "Mark Of The Devil"

  • SneakPeek
Mvd Entertainment Group will distribute 'cult titles' from the UK's Arrow Video with deluxe restored material, pioneering packaging solutions and newly commissioned artwork:

Launch titles include Tonino Valerii's 'spaghetti western', "Day of Anger" aka "Gunlaw" (1967) starring Lee Van Cleef and Giuliano Gemma, available March 17, Michael Armstrong's "Mark of the Devil" (1970) available March 24 and "Blind Woman's Curse" (1970) available March 31.

"...with music by Riz Ortolani punctuated by gunfire, 'Day Of Anger', presented here in an exclusive high-definition restoration from the original 'Techniscope' negative stars Lee Van Cleef ('The Good, the Bad and the Ugly'), as master gunfighter 'Frank Talby' and Giuliano Gemma as street cleaner 'Scott Mary', relentlessly bullied by the people of the small town of 'Clifton'. When Talby rides into town, Scott seizes the opportunity to lift himself out of the gutter, and possibly even surpass Talby's own skills. But what is Talby doing in Clifton in the first place?
See full article at SneakPeek »

Arrow Video Expanding to Us, Announces Mark of the Devil & Blind Woman’s Curse Blu-ray / DVDs

  • DailyDead
UK residents have been enjoying Arrow Video Blu-ray releases of cult films like Maniac Cop and The Funhouse for years, and soon horror hounds living stateside can enjoy the diligent distributor’s offerings now that Arrow Video is expanding to the Us. To commemorate their growth, Arrow Video has announced upcoming North American Blu-ray releases of Mark of the Devil, Blind Woman’s Curse, and more.

Making their Blu-ray debuts in the Us, 1970’s Mark of the Devil will come out on March 17th and 1971’s Blind Woman’s Curse (aka Black Cat’s Revenge on March 24th. Arrow Video will also release the Blu-ray of Blood and Black Lace on April 14th and The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Miss Osbourne to Blu-ray on April 21st. All four releases will include a DVD copy, as well. We have the official press release with full details, as well as
See full article at DailyDead »

Indie Spotlight

We return with another edition of the Indie Spotlight, highlighting recent independent horror news sent our way. Today’s feature includes details on The Book, which brings together some of the biggest names in Italian horror, a trailer for Dead of the Nite, new releases from Cavity Colors, and much more:

First Details on The Book: “The Book sees the ultimate collaborative Italian horror film unfold before your very eyes. A one off project of unprecedented scale, The Book brings together, for the very first time, the writers, directors, actors, composers and artists behind the finest Italian genre cinema of the past sixty years. This includes the creative forces behind the Giallo movement, Spaghetti Westerns, Eurocrime and more. Each director will be given the opportunity to showcase their own personal vision of Rome, spread across a dozen episodes. Each segment in this feature film will contain a unique blend of macabre thriller,
See full article at DailyDead »

Italian Horror Masters Team Up For Anthology Film The Book

If you're a fan of Italian horror films and your list of favorite filmmakers includes names like Ruggero Deodato and Lamberto Bava, then boy, are you in for a treat. Read on for all the details about an exciting upcoming horror anthology called The Book, which will only get funded with Your help!

From the Press Release

The Book sees the ultimate collaborative Italian horror film unfold before your very eyes.

A one-off project of unprecedented scale, The Book brings together, for the very first time, the writers, directors, actors, composers, and artists behind the finest Italian genre cinema of the past sixty years. This includes the creative forces behind the Giallo movement, Spaghetti Westerns, Eurocrime, and more. Each director will be given the opportunity to showcase his own personal vision of Rome, spread across a dozen episodes. Each segment in this feature film will contain a unique blend of macabre thriller,
See full article at Dread Central »

Damiano Damiani obituary

Italian director whose 1966 film A Bullet for the General, set in revolutionary Mexico, began a wave of 'tortilla westerns'

Damiano Damiani, who has died aged 90, was a director of Italian popular films and television. He was best known for La Piovra (The Octopus, 1984), an internationally successful TV series about the mafia, and made several mafia-themed films and TV movies, but his range was much wider.

Born in Pordenone, north-east Italy, he began his career in the 1940s, working in the art department and directing documentaries. As popular Italian cinema boomed in the 1960s, he began to make personal pictures, westerns, comedies, political thrillers and horror films. If you have only seen Amityville II: The Possession (1982), his one American movie, you have seen Damiani at his least inspired. In that film, the camera followed potential victims around a haunted house in a style made tedious four years earlier by John Carpenter's Halloween.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Damiano Damiani obituary

Italian director whose 1966 film A Bullet for the General, set in revolutionary Mexico, began a wave of 'tortilla westerns'

Damiano Damiani, who has died aged 90, was a director of Italian popular films and television. He was best known for La Piovra (The Octopus, 1984), an internationally successful TV series about the mafia, and made several mafia-themed films and TV movies, but his range was much wider.

Born in Pordenone, north-east Italy, he began his career in the 1940s, working in the art department and directing documentaries. As popular Italian cinema boomed in the 1960s, he began to make personal pictures, westerns, comedies, political thrillers and horror films. If you have only seen Amityville II: The Possession (1982), his one American movie, you have seen Damiani at his least inspired. In that film, the camera followed potential victims around a haunted house in a style made tedious four years earlier by John Carpenter's Halloween.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ricky D’s Favourite Cult Films #22: Essential Viewing for fans of ‘Django Unchained’ Part 3

December was Tarantino Month here at Sos, and since January is dedicated to westerns, I thought it would be best to whip up some articles spotlighting films that influenced Tarantino’s Django Unchained. Since I began my list back in December, I’ve noticed similar lists popping up online – all of which are somewhat suspect, since they recommend some terrible films. For my money, all of the movies listed below are essential viewing for fans of Django Unchained, and come highly recommended.

Note: This is the third of a three part article.

****

I Giorni dell’ira (Blood and Grit) (Day of Anger) (Gunlaw) (Days of Wrath)

Directed by Tonino Valerii

Written by Ernesto Gastaldi, Tonino Valerii, Renzo Genta

Italy, 1967

Day of Anger is a spaghetti western directed by Tonino Valerii, who began his career as Sergio Leone’s assistant and would later direct My Name Is Nobody (1973). Lee Van Cleef stars as Frank Talby,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Django Unchained Launches Emerging Artists Contest

Django Unchained Launches Emerging Artists Contest
The Weinstein Company announced an online contest today, where aspiring filmmakers can submit an original short inspired by Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained. One lucky winner will meet the director at this year's San Diego Comic-Con. Take a look at the filmmaker's video message to all prospective contestants, and read on for full details regarding this contest.

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The Weinstein Company and Red Bull North America are excited to announce an online contest for emerging filmmakers with Quentin Tarantino at the helm. Quentin has charged filmmakers with the challenge to "find your own voice," and has exclusively harnessed the power of Red Bull Media House to help get the word out.

Starting June 15th, contestants will have the opportunity to inspire Quentin Tarantino with their own original content. Contestants will have two weeks to create and submit an original multi-media piece that will be viewed and judged by Quentin and his team.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Venice Film Festival: John Exshaw's Report #5

  • CinemaRetro
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Thursday 3:00 p.m. For the Spaghetti Western posse, the day started with a press conference for the official launch of Spaghetti Western: The Secret History of Italian Cinema 4, overseen by Festival chairman, Davide Croff, and the co-curators, Marco Giusti and Manlio Gomarasca. The guest line-up was comprised of Franco Nero, Sergio Donati, and Tonino Valerii, with American director Eli Roth, and New York Times film critic Elvis Mitchell, also on hand. After Manlio had described the Spaghetti Western as, “the Italian genre which most contributed to change in worldwide cinema,” Nero spoke with passion about the Western and its continuing importance: “No male actor in the world doesn’t want to play in Westerns. Westerns were often A-movies in America, but B-movies in Italy. But these B-movies paid for all the auteur films. When I travelled to Japan and South America, in the hotel registers,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Venice Film Festival: John Exshaw's Report #4

  • CinemaRetro
On Tuesday evening, the day before the Festival officially opened, there was a press screening of the newly-restored Italian print of Fistful of Dollars. While normally the best way to watch a foreign film is in the original language with subtitles, that is not the case with Leone’s movies, unless you particularly want to hear Clint Eastwood dubbed into Italian by Enrico Maria Salerno. Contrary to rumours that recently-found additional material had been restored, the print seems much the same as that released in Italy on the Ripley’s Home Video label, only with the original opening credits – which feature as an extra on the currently-available disc – cleaned and restored, so that once again Ennio Morricone is credited as ‘Leo Nichols’, and Leone as ‘Bob Robertson’. Also, the scene in which the Rojos and the Baxters shoot it out at night in the cemetery, which was previously scratched, appears to have been cleaned up.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

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