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Desert Hearts

By 1985 Hollywood had still only dabbled in movies about the ‘shame that cannot speak its name,’ and in every case the verdict for the transgressors was regret and misery, if not death. Donna Deitch’s brilliant drama achieves exactly what she wanted, to do make a movie about a lesbian relationship that doesn’t end in a tragedy.

Desert Hearts

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 902

1985 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 96 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date November 14, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Helen Shaver, Patricia Charbonneau, Audra Lindley, Andra Akers, Gwen Welles, Dean Butler, James Staley, Katie La Bourdette, Alex McArthur, Tyler Tyhurst, Denise Crosby, Antony Ponzini, Brenda Beck, Jeffrey Tambor.

Cinematography: Robert Elswit

Film Editor: Robert Estrin

Production Design: Jeannine Oppewall

Written by Natalie Cooper from the novel by Jane Rule

Produced and Directed by Donna Deitch

Desert Hearts is a fine movie that’s also one of the first features ever about a lesbian romance,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Michael Mann's Heat: How Research Created a Classic Thriller

Ryan Lambie Dec 13, 2019

More than two decades on, Heat is still an important film. We look at how Michael Mann's research made for a powerful crime drama.

Cool, measured, melancholy and stylish, Michael Mann's Heat was a box office hit in 1995, and 18 years on, its impact can still be felt. A story about two weary men on either side of the law - one a cop married to his profession, the other a career criminal with no intention of going straight - Heat is also a movie about Los Angeles, in all its sparkly opulence and grimy malaise. Other directors have attempted to bottle some of Heat's atmosphere and move it to another city, whether it be London (see The Sweeney or the visually striking Welcome To The Punch) or Gotham, as seen in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight: look at the way Nolan and cinematographer
See full article at Den of Geek »

Michael Mann's Heat: how research created a classic thriller

Ryan Lambie Aug 21, 2017

21 years on, Heat is still an important, influential film. We look at how Michael Mann's research made for a powerful crime drama...

"This is based on observations. This is based on people I have met, people I've known, people I've sat with and talked to. Thieves, cops, killers. It's not derived from other cinema, it's based on research." Michael Mann

Cool, measured, melancholy and stylish, Michael Mann's Heat was a box office hit in 1995, and 18 years on, its impact can still be felt. A story about two weary men on either side of the law - one a cop married to his profession, the other a career criminal with no intention of going straight - Heat is also a movie about Los Angeles, in all its sparkly opulence and grimy malaise. Other directors have attempted to bottle some of Heat's atmosphere and move it to another city,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Michael Mann's Heat: how research created a classic thriller

Feature Ryan Lambie 8 May 2013 - 06:50

Eighteen years on, Heat is still an important, influential film. We look at how Michael Mann's research made for a powerful crime drama...

"This is based on observations. This is based on people I have met, people I've known, people I've sat with and talked to. Thieves, cops, killers. It's not derived from other cinema, it's based on research." Michael Mann

Cool, measured, melancholy and stylish, Michael Mann's Heat was a box office hit in 1995, and 18 years on, its impact can still be felt. A story about two weary men on either side of the law - one a cop married to his profession, the other a career criminal with no intention of going straight - Heat is also a movie about Los Angeles, in all its sparkly opulence and grimy malaise. Other directors have attempted to bottle some of Heat's
See full article at Den of Geek »

What I Watched, What You Watched: Installment #149

Cool thing about today's "What I Watched" column is you can watch the film I watched right now for free... Rampage (1987) In preparation for my William Friedkin interview I watched his 1987 legal thriller Rampage centered on a man (Alex McArthur) who goes on a brief killing spree and the district attorney (Michael Biehn) seeking the death penalty for his crimes. If I was to try to say anything to convince you to watch this film I would say do so not only because it is damn good, but because McArthur's portrayal of the killer reminded me so much of Kevin Spacey in David Fincher's Seven and Biehn's closing argument is quite bold and risky in an attempt to ratchet up the tension. I don't want to say much else because it could spoil it, but the overall theme of the picture and the ultimate takeaway is quite fascinating. The
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

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