Abbas Kiarostami - News Poster

News

Film Review: Like Someone in Love (2012) by Abbas Kiarostami

When it comes to making films, like in any kind of work, one tends to become accustomed to a certain kind of routine and even though this reality may have a distinct comfort, it also holds the danger of creative standstill to some degree. If we take a look at the world of mainstream cinema with its calculated blockbusters and tentpole films, commercial success has, in many ways, become one of the key factors when it comes to follow a formula or a pattern in order to repeat said success. However, for filmmakers such as Abbas Kiarostami, who sadly passed away in 2016, becoming used to a formula must have been a terrible nightmare, considering he has repeatedly stated that every film he made felt new to him.

Like Someone in Love” will be screened at Japan Society

Eventually, this statement may be especially true when it comes to “Like Someone in Love
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Scattered Night (2019) by Sol Kim and Lee Jihyoung

Doing its rounds this year in the festival scene is this South Korean movie which talks about family and what happens when relationships are not able to withstand the rigors of time. The camera angles were unique and mostly catered to the Pov of the daughter. I felt that the faces of characters were shown only when necessary, a special talent used exceptionally well by Abbas Kiarostami. For that matter, the direction by Sol Kim & Lee Jihyoung and cinematography by Kim Jinhyeong needs special mention.

“Scattered Night” is screening at London Korean Film Festival

The movie starts with prospective buyers viewing a house in which a family has spend the past decade. Slowly we are let into why the property is being sold. The couple has decided to draw curtains on their marriage and want to sell the house before going their separate ways. They talk to their two children,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Tokyo Stories: Japan in the Global Imagination – Film Series from November 8–December 7 at Japan Society

From the bustle of neon-lit Shinjuku and its ultramodern skyscrapers to the traditional scenery of Mt. Fuji, cherry blossoms, and Shinto shrines, Tokyo has served as a source of creative inspiration for generations of international filmmakers. Anticipating the 2020 Summer Games, when the eyes of the world will once again fall upon Japan’s dynamic capital, Tokyo Stories: Japan in the Global Imagination considers the ways Japan—and the elusive concept of “Japaneseness” —is rendered and interpreted outside its borders with a revealing selection of Tokyo-set films by foreign directors, including Japanese co-productions, Hollywood blockbusters, and European arthouse favorites.

The series kicks off November 8 with Werner Herzog’s latest film Family Romance, LLC, a quasi-documentary narrative feature concerning the function of role-playing in matters of love and business, screening in New York for the first time since it debuted at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year. Herzog is one of
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Moviegoing Memories: Ali Jaberansari

  • MUBI
Moviegoing Memories is a series of short interviews with filmmakers about going to the movies. Ali Jaberansari's Tehran: City of Love is Mubi Go's Film of the week of October 11, 2019.Ali Jaberansari (left) on the set of Tehran: City of Love.Notebook: How would you describe your movie in the least amount of words?Ali Jaberansari: It's a bittersweet comedy about three lonely and disenchanted characters looking for love and connection in a city that does not embrace them. Notebook: Where and what is your favorite movie theatre? Why is it your favorite?Jaberansari: In London, BFI Southbank is probably my favorite. Simply because of all the great classics and films projected on print that I watched and still watch there. And also because they don't let popcorn or any food in!Notebook: What is the most memorable movie screening of your life? Why is it memorable?Jaberansari: There are so many!
See full article at MUBI »

Tehran: City of Love review – the rocky road to romance in Iran

Ali Jabernansari’s engagingly downbeat comedy-drama offers intriguing insights into life into modern Iranian life

Three lonely souls in Tehran search for love in this interesting, downbeat comedy drama from writer-director Ali Jabernansari. Part portrait of alienation in Iran, part examination of modern dating, its characters suffer as much from their own human frailties as they do from the oppressive politics of Iran’s theocratic regime. There are echoes here of Abbas Kiarostami and Asghar Farhadi, and something, too, of the bittersweet air of an American indie pic hangs over it.

Forough Ghajabagli injects genuine sympathy into the sad-sacky role of Mina, a receptionist at a beauty clinic, unhappy with her weight and smouldering with bitterness. In her spare time, Mina anonymously stalks hot guys who come to the clinic (for laser hair removal mostly), messaging them with fake photos, pretending to be a model-beautiful woman called Sara.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

El Gouna Ff 2019: ‘You Will Die at 20’, Winner The Golden Star

El Gouna Ff 2019: ‘You Will Die at 20’, Winner The Golden Star
Winner of El Gouna Golden Star for Narrative Film​ went to ‘You Will Die at 20’/ ‘Satamout fi aleshrin’ by Amjad Abu Alala.Very few films come out of Sudan, so it was revealing to see two here in El Gouna: ‘You Will Die at 20’, the debut film made by the young Amjad Abu Alala, and ‘Talking About Trees’, a doc about four veteran filmmakers from Sudan in the 1960s who are still going strong and fighting the good fight in a country torn apart by dictators and wars.

However, although Amjad Abu Alala is a Sudanese filmmaker and screenwriter, he was born and raised in the UAE, where he studied media at the United Arab Emirates University. As a producer and director, he wrote and directed numerous short films that participated in various festivals, including Coffee and Orange (2004), Feathers of the Birds (2005), and Teena (2009). His film Studio (2012) was supervised
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Criterion Collection: The Koker Trilogy | Blu-ray Review

There isn’t a cinematic figure like any other, at least who straddled such a drastic historical divide of censorship, like Abbas Kiarostami, a pioneer of the New Iranian Cinema in the 1980s who became his country’s most internationally recognized auteur before sadly passing away in 2016 in the midst of preparing a new project supposedly to have been set in China. While his last two narrative features found him leaving behind Iran in the pursuit of greater creative expression, leading him to Italy/France with the beloved Certified Copy (2010) and then Japan in 2012’s Like Someone in Love (review), his cinematic contributions to post-revolution Iran helped shaped their visual expressions, using poetic symbolism as a language with which to avoid censorship.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

‘The Koker Trilogy’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Babek Ahmed Poor, Farhad Kheradmand, Mohamad Ali Keshavarz, Zarifeh Shiva, Buba Bayour, Khodabakhsh Defaei | Written and Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

They may not have a breakneck pace, and they may seem unbearably light on explicit incident, but Abbas Kiarostami’s Koker Trilogy did the shared universe thing two decades before Marvel perfected the formula. Each film is a deeply humanistic fable in its own right and each is woven into the fabric of the others. Together they show just how powerfully mind-bending the use of sequels can be.

The first part, Where Is The Friend’s House?, starts simply. One day at school, Ahmed (Babek Ahmed Poor) witnesses his friend Mohammad Reda (Ahmed Ahmed Poor) being told off by their teacher for forgetting his notebook. Reda is on his last warning – one more strike and he’s expelled. When Ahmed gets home, he realises he’s accidentally picked up Reda’s notebook.
See full article at Nerdly »

Excavating the Past Through Cinema: Ehsan Khoshbakht’s "Filmfarsi"

  • MUBI
Iranian cinema is often understood through a framework of post-revolutionary art-house film. Critically acclaimed works from the likes of Abbas Kiarostami to Mohsen Makhmalbaf ran rings around the international film festival circuit upon their releases outside of Iran, and the legacy of these works is still felt. In his epic exploration of pre-revolutionary films in Iran, Ehsan Khoshbakht seeks to excavate a new cinematic narrative for his country, at once humorous, moving, and confronting. Utilizing a personal collection of now-banned VHS tapes, Khoshbakht painstakingly compiled Filmfarsi, a visual essay that dips and dives through the melodramatic and the trashy, the romantic and the absurd. This feat is a humbling reminder of the temporality of film and the paramountcy of preserving a national cinema. In one clip, we see a sign in a local cinema that reads, “Please refrain from bringing guns into the cinema.” Through Filmfarsi, Khoshbakht repositions these once
See full article at MUBI »

Martin Scorsese, Frances McDormand, Donald Sutherland Join Lineup of France’s Lumiere Festival

  • Variety
Martin Scorsese, Frances McDormand, Donald Sutherland Join Lineup of France’s Lumiere Festival
Martin Scorsese’s eagerly awaited Netflix movie “The Irishman” wasn’t completed on time to be shown at the Cannes Film Festival, but Thierry Fremaux, Cannes’s topper, managed to pin down the high-profile movie and Scorsese himself for the upcoming Lumiere festival in Lyon next month. Dedicated to heritage movies, the Lumiere festival was created 10 years ago by Fremaux and French helmer Bertrand Tavernier.

Following its world premiere at the New York Film Festival and its international premiere at the BFI fest in London, “The Irishman” will screen at the Lumiere fest. Scorsese previously received a sprawling career tribute at this French festival in 2015 and was celebrated by an impressive delegation, including the late Abbas Kiarostami, Matteo Garrone, Elia Suleiman, Pablo Trapero Gaspard Noe and Alice Rohrwacher.

The French premiere of “The Irishman” will take place on Oct.15; it will mark one of rare opportunities to see “The Irishman
See full article at Variety »

Film Review: Falasi (2017) by Adam Taufiq Suharto

What has often been seen when it comes to short film projects by young, often first-time directors is the fact that they are able to very cleverly relieve themselves of the burdens of storytelling which a feature-length film can shoulder easily, the most significant of which is to tell a well-rounded tale with a definite beginning, middle and end. Instead they choose to subvert such expectations with short films that reflect a particular theme or mood, through an abstract, non-conformist aesthetic that not only helps them escape the pitfalls of short film storytelling, but discover a new sense of aesthetic.

What the film Falasi, a Malaysian short film by Adam Taufiq Suharto does impressively is to incorporate many conventions of the genre it is influenced by effectively, that is, the Film Noir.

So without much fuss, we have the insomniac protagonist, the object of desire (who in this case is
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

NYC Weekend Watch: Outsider Visions of America, Godard x Pasolini, Lucrecia Martel & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

“Another Country: Outsider Visions of America” offers films by Raúl Ruiz, Straub-Huillet, Wenders, Verhoeven and more.

Eternal Sunshine plays for free Friday night on Governor’s Island.

IFC Center

The rather staggering Abbas Kiarostami retrospective continues, with screenings of the Koker trilogy, Ten, Taste of Cherry, Certified Copy and more.



Metrograph
See full article at The Film Stage »

'The New Pope' Cinematographer Luca Bigazzi to Get Venice Festival Award

Acclaimed Italian cinematographer Luca Bigazzi will be honored with this year's Campari Passion Award, a prize handed out by the Venice International Film Festival to honor below-the-line film talents, such as cinematographers, editors, composers and set and costume designers.

A versatile and adaptable filmmaker, Bigazzi has worked with a wide range of directors, including Iranian helmer Abbas Kiarostami (Certified Copy) or Italy's Michele Placido (Romanzo Criminale) and Silvio Soldini (Bread and Tulips). But he is best know for his long-running collaboration with Italian director Paolo Sorrentino, having lensed Sorrentino's Il Divo, Youth and The Great Beauty, among others.

Bigazzi also ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

I'm a trans woman. Kiarostami's films helped me escape a prison of the mind

Films like Close-Up and Certified Copy travel across a thin line of identity separating laborer from director, lover from stranger

The first thing I did after I was a woman for the very first time was to watch a movie by Abbas Kiarostami. The movie was Close-Up, and it spoke in so many ways to exactly what I was trying to understand about myself that night. It felt like fate, or divine intervention, that I got to watch that movie at that exact moment.

I was assigned male at birth, and all throughout my life I had felt intense desires to be female. I didn’t always recognize them as such, because I was into my 30s before I really knew what transgender was or that “normal” people could change gender. For most of my life, I just thought I felt a perverted desire to wear women’s clothes, so
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

NYC Weekend Watch: Outsider Visions of America, Koker Trilogy, ‘Joan the Maid’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

“Another Country: Outsider Visions of America” offers films by Demy, Resnais, Antonioni, Varda and more.

IFC Center

The rather staggering Abbas Kiarostami retrospective continues, with screenings of the Koker trilogy and more.



Quad Cinema

Jacques Rivette’s masterpiece Joan the Maid has begun screening in a fantastic-looking 4K restoration.

Metrograph

Written by Paul and Leonard Schrader,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Critic's Picks: An August To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.

Critic's Picks: An August To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.
Abbas Kiarostami At The Aero | 1328 Montana Ave.

One of the year’s most significant touring retrospectives comes to Los Angeles this month when Santa Monica’s Aero Theatre hosts four evenings of films by the late Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami. Pairing notable features with a selection of rare shorts, the series surveys a sizable swath of the director’s most fruitful period, beginning Aug. 8 with his final two features, Like Someone in Love and the posthumously completed 24 Frames. Moving more or less backwards from there, the series continues Aug. 9 with a double bill of the ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Rushes: "The Irishman" Trailer, Mohammad Rasoulof Sentenced, Long-Ass Films

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSDavid Cronenberg on the set of CrashThis year's Venice Film Festival will premiere a brand new 4K restoration of David Cronenberg's cult classic Crash. "Seems like only yesterday that we were shooting it," Cronenberg says. Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof, best known for films Manuscripts Don't Burn (2013) and A Man of Integrity (2017), has been sentenced to one year in prison for "propaganda against the state," highlighting the plight of artists in Iran. Recommended VIEWINGBehold, the official trailer for Martin Scorsese's The Irishman, starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci. A first look at Robert Eggers' The Lighthouse, the follow-up to The Witch, which follows two men struggling for both physical and mental survival in a tower on an isolated island. Notebook's Cannes correspondent Leonardo Goi describes the film as
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Machiko Kyō, Abbas Kiarostami, Godzilla & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Films by Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, and Naruse kick off a retrospective of Japanese actress Machiko Kyō.

The Pasolini retrospective continues.

Streetwise and its follow-up, Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell, begin a run.

The restoration of A Bigger Splash continues screening, while the ’90s indie film Chalk has been restored.

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
See full article at The Film Stage »

Watch: A Trailer for Janus Films' 'Abbas Kiarostami: A Retrospective'

"We have lots of trees here, my boy." Janus Films is proud to present a touring retrospective show spanning Abbas Kiarostami's nearly five-decade career. The tour includes new restorations, from Criterion Collection and MK2, of The Koker Trilogy, Taste of Cherry, The Wind Will Carry Us, plus rarely screened shorts and documentaries. To promote the launch of this classic retrospective series, Janus has released an official trailer featuring bits and pieces, clips and footage, from all of his various films. Abbas Kiarostami sadly passed away in 2016, but made quite an impact on cinema making numerous films that have gone on to become beloved classics. His first feature was The Report, made in 1977, only two years before the 1979 revolution in Iran. He won Palme d'Or in Cannes in 1997 for Taste of Cherry. His final film was 24 Frames, which showed in Cannes and was released in 2017. This is a beautiful trailer
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Abbas Kiarostami: A Retrospective’ Trailer: Janus Films Highlights The Acclaimed Filmmaker’s Best Films & Never-Before-Seen Shorts

There’s nothing like recognition from your peers to help build your reputation in your given field. And if you’re a filmmaker, having special commendations from legends like Jim Jarmusch, Jean-Luc Godard, and Martin Scorsese is pretty invaluable. So, even if you’re not familiar with the work of Abbas Kiarostami, then take it from those three, he’s a filmmaker you need to know.

Thankfully, Janus Films is here to help you not only experience the work of Kiarostami but to do so in one of the most comprehensive and amazing ways.

Continue reading ‘Abbas Kiarostami: A Retrospective’ Trailer: Janus Films Highlights The Acclaimed Filmmaker’s Best Films & Never-Before-Seen Shorts at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed