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Leonardo DiCaprio Eyes Guillermo Del Toro's Nightmare Alley

Leonardo DiCaprio Eyes Guillermo Del Toro's Nightmare Alley
Leonardo DiCaprio may be teaming up with Guillermo del Toro. DiCaprio has been rather quiet for the last few years, ever since winning his first Oscar for his performance in 2015's The Revenant. The heralded actor took some time off but now, he's back at it again and he's possibly going to work with one of the most acclaimed directors in the business today for the first time, as del Toro is eyeing DiCaprio for a role in his upcoming Nightmare Alley remake.

According to a new report, Leonardo DiCaprio is in talks to star in Nightmare Alley, which is being positioned as Guillermo del Toro's next directorial effort. Del Toro's The Shape of Water went on to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards last year and, since then, he's been content to take his time before jumping right into to his next directorial effort. He's lined up several potential projects,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Sea Hawk

Grand action entertainment bursts forth on the high seas, showing us how much production value Golden Hollywood could lavish on an exciting, artful swashbuckler. Errol Flynn is at his glorious best, backed by greats like Flora Robson, Henry Daniell and Claude Rains in fine form. The special effects and full-sized ship sets impress in ways that computer generated images never will. And the rousing music of Erich Wolfgang Korngold seals the deal — the term ‘Timeless Classic’ was invented for marvels like this.

The Sea Hawk

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1940 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 127 min. / Street Date December 18, 2018 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Errol Flynn, Brenda Marshall, Claude Rains, Donald Crisp, Flora Robson, Alan Hale, Henry Daniell, Una O’Connor, James Stephenson, Gilbert Roland, William Lundigan, Julien Mitchell, Montagu Love, J.M. Kerrigan, David Bruce, Fritz Leiber, Francis McDonald, Pedro de Cordoba, Ian Keith, Jack La Rue, Halliwell Hobbes, Victor Varconi,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: First 'Pirates of the Caribbean' One of Most Enjoyable Summer Blockbusters of Early 21st Century

'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl': Johnny Depp as Capt. Jack Sparrow. 'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl' review: Mostly an enjoyable romp (Oscar Movie Series) Pirate movies were a Hollywood staple for about three decades, from the mid-'20s (The Sea Hawk, The Black Pirate) to the mid-to-late '50s (Moonfleet, The Buccaneer), when the genre, by then mostly relegated to B films, began to die down. Sporadic resurrections in the '80s and '90s turned out to be critical and commercial bombs (Pirates, Cutthroat Island), something that didn't bode well for the Walt Disney Company's $140 million-budgeted film "adaptation" of one of their theme-park rides. But Neptune's mood has apparently improved with the arrival of the new century. He smiled – grinned would be a more appropriate word – on the Gore Verbinski-directed Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tcmff 2015: ‘Nightmare Alley’ is an under-appreciated Carny-Noir

Nightmare Alley

Written by Jules Furthman

Directed by Edmund Goulding

U.S.A., 1947

A carny cons his way up to high society through cold-reading and (un)timely circumstance. Based on that one-liner, who would you cast? If you say Tyrone Power, I’d say that my friend Stan Carlisle is on his way (The name Stan Carlisle being a con-industry handshake of sorts, informing one con-artist that he’s stepping in on another man’s con, or at least according to Eddie “The Czar of Noir” Muller’s introduction of this film at Tcmff). In Nightmare Alley, Tyrone Power, the 20th Century Fox matinee idol, plays a lowlife con man, who lies and cheats his way from a podunk carnival to becoming a spiritualist amongst the more gullible of Chicago’s upper crust. His character is also the namesake of the above con slang.

And any which way, yes, Tyrone Power
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Nightmare Alley’ is a dark, pessimistic descent into compulsion and greed

Nightmare Alley

Written by Jules Furthman

Directed by Edmund Goulding

U.S.A., 1947

Who can tell when they are being conned? Or lied to for that matter? Some people are blessed (or cursed) with a potentially dangerous gift, that of being able to fool their way into earning other people’s confidence. It is a perverse talent to say the least, a double-edged sword. When caught in a rut, the ability to smooth talk one’s way to calmer shores is commendable, but when the same talents are applied by someone with far fewer moral scruples, then the consequences may ultimately prove painful for both the con victim and the artist. Nightmare Alley, directed by Edmund Goulding, is a bit of an anomaly within film noir for its setting and the sort of protagonist the story evolves around. In fact, the case can be made that he is more antagonist than protagonist.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Once a Star Always a Star: Turner's Scandals on TCM

Lana Turner movies: Scandal and more scandal Lana Turner is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" star today, Saturday, August 10, 2013. I’m a little — or rather, a lot — late in the game posting this article, but there are still three Lana Turner movies left. You can see Turner get herself embroiled in scandal right now, in Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life (1959), both the director and the star’s biggest box-office hit. More scandal follows in Mark Robson’s Peyton Place (1957), the movie that earned Lana Turner her one and only Academy Award nomination. And wrapping things up is George Sidney’s lively The Three Musketeers (1948), with Turner as the ruthless, heartless, remorseless — but quite elegant — Lady de Winter. Based on Fannie Hurst’s novel and a remake of John M. Stahl’s 1934 melodrama about mother love, class disparities, racism, and good cooking, Imitation of Life was shown on
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

One Henreid, a Couple of Cigarettes, and Four Davises

Paul Henreid: From lighting two cigarettes and blowing smoke onto Bette Davis’ face to lighting two cigarettes while directing twin Bette Davises Paul Henreid is back as Turner Classic Movies’ Star of the Month of July 2013. TCM will be showing four movies featuring Henreid (Now, Voyager; Deception; The Madwoman of Chaillot; The Spanish Main) and one directed by him (Dead Ringer). (Photo: Paul Henreid lights two cigarettes on the set of Dead Ringer, while Bette Davis remembers the good old days.) (See also: “Paul Henreid Actor.”) Irving Rapper’s Now, Voyager (1942) was one of Bette Davis’ biggest hits, and it remains one of the best-remembered romantic movies of the studio era — a favorite among numerous women and some gay men. But why? Personally, I find Now, Voyager a major bore, made (barely) watchable only by a few of the supporting performances (Claude Rains, Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hollywood’s John Wilkes Booth

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat is a monthly newspaper run by Steve DeBellis, a well know St. Louis historian, and it’s the largest one-man newspaper in the world. The concept of The Globe is that there is an old historic headline, then all the articles in that issue are written as though it’s the year that the headline is from. It’s an unusual concept but the paper is now in its 25th successful year! Steve and I collaborated in May of 2011 on an all-Vincent Price issue of The Globe and I’ve been writing a regular monthly movie-related column since. Since there is no on-line version of The Globe, I post all of my articles here at We Are Movie Geeks. This month’s edition of The Globe takes place in 1865, the year President Lincoln was shot .Steve and I originally decided I would write an article
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: Demille's "Cleopatra" (1934) UK Dual Blu-ray/DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
(Note: This review pertains to the UK Region 2 Pal format release available on www.amazon.co.uk)

By Adrian Smith

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Cecil B. DeMille will always be remembered for his lavish historical epics like The Ten Commandments (1923 and again in 1956), Sign of the Cross (1932) and Samson and Delilah (1949). However, with over one hundred and sixty credits as either director or producer, he also worked in plenty of other genres. Following two flops, This Day and Age (1933) and Four Frightened People (1934), Paramount head Adolph Zukor insisted he try to replicate the success of Sign of the Cross with another visual spectacle. DeMille agreed and cast Claudette Colbert in the lead role of Cleopatra (she had already starred in both Sign of the Cross and Four Frightened People and was about to win the Oscar for It Happened one Night (1934)).

The plot focuses on Cleopatra's
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Abraham Lincoln | Blu-ray Review

Capitalizing on the latest biopic of the sixteenth United States President with this month’s release of Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln, Kino releases a mastered HD restoration of D.W. Griffith’s 1930 film, Abraham Lincoln. Serving as the silent film master’s official foray into sound, this serves as the conservative counterpart to Spielberg’s bearded game changer, with dueling depictions that couldn’t be more disparate in quality or content. Griffith’s film is regarded by many to be a poorly made endeavor, regardless of his renowned manifestations of blatant racism that are certainly present here, and Huston’s dowdy performance hardly rates next to the magnificent Daniel Day Lewis. But even if Spielberg’s log cabin abolitionist is more a portrait of the man we hope and wish Lincoln was, experiencing Griffith’s version serves to highlight not only how far we’ve come in the advancement of filmmaking,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Myrna Loy Classics on TCM

Myrna Loy Movies Turner Classic Movies, Thursday, August 2 6:00 Am The Great Divide (1929) A businessman masquerades as a bandit to kidnap a flapper and end her reckless days. Dir: Reginald Barker. Cast: Dorothy Mackaill, Ian Keith, Myrna Loy. Black and White-73 minutes. 7:15 Am The Naughty Flirt (1931) A flighty heiress goes to work as a secretary to win the straitlaced man she loves. Dir: Edward Cline. Cast: Alice White, Paul Page, Myrna Loy. Black and White-56 minutes. 8:15 Am The Barbarian (1933) An Arab prince masquerades as a tour guide to court a beautiful American. Dir: Sam Wood. Cast: Ramon Novarro, [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Queen Christina: Greta Garbo Transcendental / John Gilbert

Greta Garbo, Queen Christina Queen Christina (1933). Director: Rouben Mamoulian. Cast: Greta Garbo, John Gilbert, Ian Keith, Lewis Stone, Elizabeth Young, C. Aubrey Smith, Reginald Owen, David Torrence. Screenplay: H.M. Harwood and S.N. Behrman. (Salka Viertel was also credited, though reportedly was not an actual contributor.*) One of the most ambitious productions of the early ’30s, the Greta Garbo star vehicle Queen Christina remains surprisingly modern in its execution thanks in large part to director Rouben Mamoulian’s classy, assured touch. Those looking for historical accuracy in the film, however, will be greatly disappointed, for credited screenwriters H.M. Harwood and S.N. Behrman kept themselves busy concocting [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movies... For Free! Dick Tracy's Dilemma (1947)

Showcasing classic movies that have fallen out of copyright and are available freely from the public domain...

Dick Tracy's Dilemma a.k.a Mark of the Claw, 1947.

Directed by John Rawlins.

Starring Ralph Byrd, Kay Christopher, Lyle Latell, Jack Lambert, Ian Keith, Bernadene Hayes, Jimmy Conlin, William B. Davidson, Tony Barrett and Tom Keene.

After releasing two features with Morgan Conway as Chester Gould's celebrated police detective Dick Tracy, Rko bowed to exhibitor pressure and recast Conway with Ralph Byrd, the actor who had made his name as Tracy in four Republic serials between 1937 and 1941.

Dick Tracy's Dilemma sees the detective investigating a number of crimes - the theft of a fortune in furs, an insurance swindle and the obligatory murders - all of which he links to a hook-handed criminal known as The Claw. Returning to the cast for this third outing are Lyle Latell as Pat Patton
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movies... For Free! Dick Tracy vs. Cueball (1946)

Showcasing classic movies that have fallen out of copyright and are available freely from the public domain...

Dick Tracy vs. Cueball, 1946.

Directed by Gordon Douglas.

Starring Morgan Conway, Dick Wessel, Anne Jeffreys, Lyle Latell, Joseph Crehan, Ian Keith, Rita Corday, Douglas Walton and Jimmy Crane.

Morgan Conway makes his second and final appearance as Chester Gould's incorruptible police detective in Dick Tracy vs. Cueball, a sequel to 1945's Dick Tracy, Detective. This time Tracy finds himself on the trail of the murderous Cueball, an ex-con who kills a diamond thief and takes the loot for himself. Tracy plans to catch Cueball by allowing his girlfriend Tess Trueheart (the returning Anne Jeffrey's) to act as a buyer for the diamonds, only for Cueball to take her hostage as he vows to eliminate the hard-boiled lawman.

Stepping into the director's chair for this second feature adventure is Gordon Douglas, whose previous
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Queen Christina d: Rouben Mamoulian

Queen Christina (1933) Direction: Rouben Mamoulian Screenplay: H. M. Harwood and S. N. Behrman Cast: Greta Garbo, John Gilbert, Ian Keith, Lewis Stone, Elizabeth Young, C. Aubrey Smith, Reginald Owen, David Torrence One of the most ambitious productions of the early 1930s, Queen Christina remains surprisingly modern in its execution thanks in large part to Rouben Mamoulian’s assured hand. Those looking for historical accuracy in the film, however, will be greatly disappointed, for credited screenwriters H. M. Harwood and S. N. Behrman kept themselves busy concocting a highly fictionalized version of the Swedish queen; one who experiences an all-consuming and ultimately tragic love affair with a Spanish envoy. (Garbo biographer Mark Vieira explains [see below] that credited screenwriter — and close Garbo friend — Salka Viertel did not in any way help in the writing of the Queen Christina screenplay.) The unusual Swedish monarch is played with passionate determination by the equally unusual Swedish star Greta Garbo,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Professor deems science of Bond film "irresponsible"

With Q and his madcap inventions enjoying a starring role in 20 of James Bond’s 22 cinematic outings, realistic science has often gone out the window. When was the last time you saw an underwater Lotus Espirit? Got behind the wheel of your invisible car or had a laser fight in space? ‘Nuff said. But with 2006’s Casino Royale, the franchise got a reboot. Our hero was now more vulnerable, his foes less ridiculous and the plots more sensible. Q had been shown the door and everyone was rejoicing at the more credible and convincing science. Everyone except Salford University Professor Keith Ross who has accused the explosive climax to Casino Royale’s follow-up Quantum of Solace of “irresponsible scaremongering”.

Professor Ross is currently working on a research project into hydrogen and its viability as a more eco-friendly and economical alternative to petrol and diesel and was disturbed by its depiction in Quantum of Solace.
See full article at BoxWish »

DVD Releases: 1/15/08

While no blockbuster horror horror is due out this week, we do have some indie titles, straight to DVD and re-releases to choose from.

The Attic

About a month after Emma Callan (Elisabeth Moss) and her family move into their seemingly picture-perfect Victorian home, Emma starts to have ghastly visions of a girl who appears to be her twin but is pure evil. Since no one else has seen this doppelganger, Emma is faced with two terrifying prospects: Either she s going insane or she s actually being haunted by a malevolent spirit determined to destroy anyone who dares delve into the dark mysteries of The Attic. Co-starring John Savage and Catherine Mary Stewart, this riveting film from the director of Pet Cemetery will fire up your most intense fears while it makes your blood run cold!

Earth Vs The Flying Saucers (1956)

Re-released to DVD.Dr. Russell Marvin heads up Operation Skyhook,
See full article at ZombieFriends »

DVD Releases: 1/15/08

While no blockbuster horror horror is due out this week, we do have some indie titles, straight to DVD and re-releases to choose from.

The Attic

About a month after Emma Callan (Elisabeth Moss) and her family move into their seemingly picture-perfect Victorian home, Emma starts to have ghastly visions of a girl who appears to be her twin but is pure evil. Since no one else has seen this doppelganger, Emma is faced with two terrifying prospects: Either she s going insane or she s actually being haunted by a malevolent spirit determined to destroy anyone who dares delve into the dark mysteries of The Attic. Co-starring John Savage and Catherine Mary Stewart, this riveting film from the director of Pet Cemetery will fire up your most intense fears while it makes your blood run cold!

Earth Vs The Flying Saucers (1956)

Re-released to DVD.Dr. Russell Marvin heads up Operation Skyhook,
See full article at ZombieFriends »

See also

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