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Hope and Crosby – The Road Pictures

The Road to Singapore, Zanzibar,

Morocco and Utopia

Blu ray

Kino Lorber

1940, 41, 42, 43, 46 / 1:33:1 / 85, 91, 82, 90 Min. / Street Date – March 26, 2019

Starring Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Dorothy Lamour

Written by Frank Butler, Don Hartman, Melvin Frank

Cinematography by William C. Mellor, Ted Tetzlaff

Directed by Victor Schertzinger, David Butler, Hal Walker

Between 1940 and 1962, Bob Hope and Bing Crosby starred in seven “Road” pictures directed by such distinct talents as David Butler, Norman McLeod and Hope’s own gag-writer Norman Panama who would lead the comedian kicking and screaming into the sixties with How to Commit Marriage, a poison pen letter to the counterculture released in 1969.

Though produced during a World War, the first four Road films avoided the cynicism of that late 60’s farce – instead they were the essence of disposable fun – populist entertainments peppered with topical wisecracks, potshots at company brass and the occasional talking fish. Beginning with Road to Singapore, a
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Rediscovering Long-Forgotten Pioneering Comedy Performer: She Could Have Been Chaplin!

Comedy actress Alice Howell on the cover of film historian Anthony Slide's latest book: Pioneering funky-haired performer 'could have been Chaplin' – or at the very least another Louise Fazenda. Rediscovering comedy actress Alice Howell: Female performer in movie field dominated by men Early comedy actress Alice Howell is an obscure entity even for silent film aficionados. With luck, only a handful of them will be able to name one of her more than 100 movies, mostly shorts – among them Sin on the Sabbath, A Busted Honeymoon, How Stars Are Made – released between 1914 and 1920. Yet Alice Howell holds (what should be) an important – or at the very least an interesting – place in film history. After all, she was one of the American cinema's relatively few pioneering “funny actresses,” along with the likes of the better-known Flora Finch, Louise Fazenda, and, a top star in her day, Mabel Normand.[1] Also of note,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Lubitsch Pt.II: The Magical Touch with MacDonald, Garbo Sorely Missing from Today's Cinema

'The Merry Widow' with Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald and Minna Gombell under the direction of Ernst Lubitsch. Ernst Lubitsch movies: 'The Merry Widow,' 'Ninotchka' (See previous post: “Ernst Lubitsch Best Films: Passé Subtle 'Touch' in Age of Sledgehammer Filmmaking.”) Initially a project for Ramon Novarro – who for quite some time aspired to become an opera singer and who had a pleasant singing voice – The Merry Widow ultimately starred Maurice Chevalier, the hammiest film performer this side of Bob Hope, Jim Carrey, Adam Sandler – the list goes on and on. Generally speaking, “hammy” isn't my idea of effective film acting. For that reason, I usually find Chevalier a major handicap to his movies, especially during the early talkie era; he upsets their dramatic (or comedic) balance much like Jack Nicholson in Martin Scorsese's The Departed or Jerry Lewis in anything (excepting Scorsese's The King of Comedy
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Noteworthy: "88:88", The Films of Joaquim Pinto, Photogénie #2

  • MUBI
Edited by Adam Cook

Above: a sneak peak of Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice, via our Tumblr. A wealth of content from the Melbourne International Film Festival's newly launched Critics Campus has been published here and here. For Rolling Stone, filmmaker James Gray writes on Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now on the occasion of its 35th anniversary:

"The film is indeed self-consciously mythic, and with its transcendent imagery, it enters the cosmic realm. Captain Willard is an enigmatic hero, and we need the narration (written by Dispatches author Michael Herr) to help us know him. Surely the man has his dark side: he kills a wounded Vietnamese woman and hacks Colonel Kurtz to death. But by the end, Willard retains enough of his soul to protect the innocent, childlike Lance (Sam Bottoms), and here we see that the human connection endures. The film's experience expands in this moment,
See full article at MUBI »

Hutton Pt.2: From Morgan's Creek to Mature Leading Lady

Betty Hutton movies (photo: Betty Hutton in The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek, with Eddie Bracken) [See previous post: "Betty Hutton Bio: The Blonde Bombshell."] Buddy DeSylva did as promised. Betty Hutton was given a key supporting role in Victor Schertzinger’s 1942 musical comedy The Fleet’s In, starring Dorothy Lamour, William Holden, and Eddie Bracken. “Her facial grimaces, body twists and man-pummeling gymnastics take wonderfully to the screen,” enthused Pm magazine. (Hutton would have a cameo, as Hetty Button, in the 1952 remake Sailor Beware, starring Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, and Corinne Calvet.) The following year, Betty Hutton landed the second female lead in Happy Go Lucky (1943), singing Jimmy McHugh and Frank Loesser’s "Murder, He Says," and stealing the show from fellow Broadway import Mary Martin and former Warner Bros. crooner Dick Powell. She also got co-star billing opposite Bob Hope in Sidney Lanfield’s musical comedy Let’s Face It. Additionally, Paramount’s hugely successful all-star war-effort
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Best Movies of Everybody's (Second) Favorite Year: From Caligari to Pollyanna

In Robert Wiene’s 1920 dreamlike horror classic, veteran German actor Werner Krauss plays the mysterious Dr. Caligari, the apparent force behind a creepy somnambulist named Cesare and played by Conrad Veidt, who abducts beautiful Lil Dagover. The finale in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari has inspired tons of movies and television shows, from Fritz Lang's 1944 film noir The Woman in the Window to the last episode of the TV series St. Elsewhere. In addition, the film shares some key elements in common (suppposedly as a result of a mere coincidence) with Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio's 2011 thriller Shutter Island. The 1920 crime melodrama Outside the Law is not in any way related to Rachid Bouchareb's 2010 political drama. Instead, the Tod Browning-directed movie is a well-made entry in the gangster genre (long before the explosion a decade later). Browning, best known for his early '30s efforts Dracula and Freaks,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The history of MGM: the silent era

In the first part of a new series, Zoe takes a look back at the history of MGM, one of Hollywood’s oldest and most notable studios...

Studios have come and gone since the birth of cinema, and the film business is an unpredictable one, as the history of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer reveals. Founded in 1924, its name conjures up images of lavish musicals, sweeping historical epics, glamorous stars and its mascot, Leo the lion.

It’s fair to say that MGM is one of the most famous and influential studios in Hollywood, and certainly one of the most iconic studios to come out of American film industry. But where did it all begin?

The story begins in the early 1920s. Vaudeville, previously one of the most popular forms of entertainment, is beginning to dwindle, as movies capture the public’s imagination. Enter Marcus Loew, a theatre chain owner. What Loew wanted was
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blu-Ray Review: ‘Topsy-Turvy,’ ‘The Mikado’ Join Criterion Collection Together

Chicago – Leave it to The Criterion Collection to not just perfectly remaster one of the most acclaimed films of the ’90s but to take its ancestor, the film version of the play in which the modern classic centers around, and give it a similarly remarkable treatment. Fans of Mike Leigh’s “Topsy-Turvy” will adore the new Criterion edition, available now on DVD and Blu-ray, but they should also pick up “The Mikado” to see the inspirational musical in its entirety.

Blu-Ray Rating: 4.5/5.0

Mike Leigh is an international treasure; undeniably one of the best living directors. If you have yet to see films like “Secrets & Lies,” “Naked,” “Vera Drake,” and “Happy-Go-Lucky,” get thee to a Netflix queue and dive into the filmography of this fascinating filmmaker, one who works without a net. Most Leigh films are improvised affairs in which he knows the loose foundation of the story but works collaboratively
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

DVD Playhouse--April 2011

DVD Playhouse—April 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Hereafter (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood’s spiritual thriller follows a trio of characters whose seemingly disparate paths converge: Matt Damon as a blue collar Joe who tries to fight against his psychic powers that see “the other side,” Cecile de France as a journalist who somehow survives the tsunami that crushed Indonesia, and a London schoolboy (Frankie and George McLaren) who seeks answers after losing his twin brother. Like all of Eastwood’s films, the narrative construction is tight as a drum, with solid work by all involved. That said, “solid” would have to be the operative word to describe the proceedings here, as well as “unremarkable” and “uninvolving” on an emotional level. Perhaps we expect too much when we see Clint’s name on a film these days, but that’s the flip side of being one of the best. Blu-ray/DVD combo pack.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

DVD Playhouse--April 2011

DVD Playhouse—April 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Hereafter (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood’s spiritual thriller follows a trio of characters whose seemingly disparate paths converge: Matt Damon as a blue collar Joe who tries to fight against his psychic powers that see “the other side,” Cecile de France as a journalist who somehow survives the tsunami that crushed Indonesia, and a London schoolboy (Frankie and George McLaren) who seeks answers after losing his twin brother. Like all of Eastwood’s films, the narrative construction is tight as a drum, with solid work by all involved. That said, “solid” would have to be the operative word to describe the proceedings here, as well as “unremarkable” and “uninvolving” on an emotional level. Perhaps we expect too much when we see Clint’s name on a film these days, but that’s the flip side of being one of the best. Blu-ray/DVD combo pack.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Weekend Shopping Guide 4/1/11: Topsy Venture

  • Quick Stop
The weekend’s here. You’ve just been paid, and it’s burning a hole in your pocket. What’s a pop culture geek to do? In hopes of steering you in the right direction to blow some of that hard-earned cash, it’s time for the Fred Weekend Shopping Guide - your spotlight on the things you didn’t even know you wanted…

(Please support Fred by using the links below to make any impulse purchases - it helps to keep us going…)

Hank & Dean fans rejoice! Not only has the second half of Venture Bros.: Season 4 (Adult Swim, Not Rated, DVD-$19.98 Srp) hit standard DVD, but the entirety of Venture Bros.: Season 4 (Adult Swim, Not Rated, Blu-Ray-$39.99 Srp) is now available in lovely high definition. Both releases sport audio commentaries and deleted scenes courtesy of Astrobase Go. In other words, buy them both. Now.

I know
See full article at Quick Stop »

This Week On DVD and Blu-ray: March 29, 2011

DVD Links: DVD News | Release Dates | New Dvds | Reviews | RSS Feed

Topsy-Turvy (Criterion Collection) I have not yet had the time to dive into Criterion's Blu-ray release for Mike Leigh's Topsy-Turvy, a film I only saw for the first time last December when I mentioned it in my What I Watched column. I am leading off with it, however, just to make sure I put it on your radar before I write up my review. This is a great film and one that deviates from what you may expect from a Leigh film in terms of story, but when you see how it all comes together it's most certainly recognizable as definitive Leigh. Tangled I just posted my review of this one, and it's a short one because there isn't much to talk about. While I love this movie and after watching it again don't regret including it in
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Hilary Swank's "Resident" Evil, the Second Flight of "Black Swan," and More New DVDs

  • IFC
"The Resident" (2011)

Directed by Antti Jokinen

Released by Image Entertainment

This actually isn't the first time Hilary Swank has seen one of her films go direct to DVD after the films "Red Dust" and "Birds of America" suffered the same fate, but surely there was more riding on this horror film from the resurgent Hammer Films about a recently separated doctor who learns her Brooklyn loft isn't quite as wonderful as she thought it would be. "Secretary" screenwriter Erin Cressida Wilson co-wrote this film, which co-stars Christopher Lee, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, and Lee Pace.

"The Mikado" (1939)

Directed by Victor Schertzinger

Released by Criterion Collection

"Topsy-Turvy" (1999)

Directed by Mike Leigh

Released by Criterion Collection

Sold separately, Criterion is making no secret of trying to appeal to Gilbert and Sullivan fanatics with special editions of "The Mikado," a straight-up adaptation of the musical duo's most famous opera, and Mike Leigh's "Topsy-Turvy,
See full article at IFC »

Miriam Seegar, 103, Dies: One of the Last Surviving Silent Film Performers

Miriam Seegar, one of the last surviving adult performers to have been featured in silent films, died of "age-related causes" on Sunday, Jan. 2, at her home in Pasadena. She was 103. Born on Sept. 1, 1907, in Greentown, Ind., Seegar began her film career in England. After replacing Sylvia Sidney in the play Crime in the West End, she landed roles in three British silent films, most notably the female lead in When Knights Were Bold (1929), directed by her future husband, Tim Whelan. In Hollywood, Seegar played in two movies opposite Richard Dix, then a highly popular leading man: the silent The Love Doctor (1929) and in Reginald Barker's early talkie Seven Keys to Baldpate (1929), a humorous mystery-thriller that is perhaps her best-known film. Among Seegar's other film credits were Victor Schertzinger's Fashions in Love with Adolphe Menjou (1929); the Fox Movietone Follies of 1930; What a Man (1930), [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Criterion Collection Announces March Titles

  • Reelartsy
My favorite distributors The Criterion Collection have announced three new titles for Blu-ray/DVD release this coming March! On March 22, the Oscar-winning documentary The Times of Harvey Milk (Robert Epstein, 1984) will come out. Then on March 29, Criterion will release Topsy-Turvy (Mike Leigh, 1999) and The Mikado (Victor Schertzinger, 1939).

The Times of Harvey Milk

Extras include:

Audio commentary featuring director Robert Epstein, coeditor Deborah Hoffmann, and photographer Daniel NicolettaNew interview with documentary filmmaker and Uc Berkeley professor Jon ElseNew program about The Times of Harvey Milk and Gus Van Sant's Milk, featuring Epstein, Van Sant, actor James Franco, and friends Cleve Jones, Anne Kronenberg, and NicolettaPostscript containing interview clips not used in the filmRare collection of audio and video recordings of Harvey MilkInterview excerpts from Epstein's research tapesFootage from the film's Castro Theatre premiere and the 1984 Academy Awards ceremonyPanel discussion on Supervisor Dan White's controversial trialExcerpts from the twenty-fifth anniversary
See full article at Reelartsy »

News Shorts: December 15th 2010, Volume Two

The first photo of Glenn Close dressed as a man on the set of Albert Noobs, two new photos of Justin Bieber in his concert movie Never Say Never.

"A purported copy of Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight Rises" script landed on-line claiming to reveal the villains of the piece - Dr. Hugo Strange (the main villain), Talia al Ghul (female lead/secondary villain), Black Mask (the mob boss), and Killer Croc (mob's muscle). Warner Bros. Pictures have since denied such a leak while the source is purported to be a poster on the Superhero Hype forums..." (full details)

"Summit has now locked in a March 23rd release date for the Mel Gibson-led dark comedy "The Beaver". A limited run will begin on the date before expanding two weeks later on April 8th, that expansion's size will likely be determined by the reaction and box-office opening weekend results.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

News Shorts: December 15th 2010, Volume Two

The first photo of Glenn Close dressed as a man on the set of Albert Noobs, two new photos of Justin Bieber in his concert movie Never Say Never.

"A purported copy of Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight Rises" script landed on-line claiming to reveal the villains of the piece - Dr. Hugo Strange (the main villain), Talia al Ghul (female lead/secondary villain), Black Mask (the mob boss), and Killer Croc (mob's muscle). Warner Bros. Pictures have since denied such a leak while the source is purported to be a poster on the Superhero Hype forums..." (full details)

"Summit has now locked in a March 23rd release date for the Mel Gibson-led dark comedy "The Beaver". A limited run will begin on the date before expanding two weeks later on April 8th, that expansion's size will likely be determined by the reaction and box-office opening weekend results.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

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