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Rushes: Guadagnino on Mubi, cléo Closes, Steven Soderbergh Now & Then

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSThe word is out: Mubi has acquired the worldwide rights for Luca Guadagnino's luminous short film The Staggering Girl, starring Julianne Moore, Mia Goth, KiKi Layne, Kyle MacLachlan and more. Deadline has the full report.We're very saddened that due to Ontario's arts funding cuts, the essential feminist film magazine cléo has announced their immediate closure. At The Globe & Mail, the magazine's editors and contributors reflect upon their run and the tangible community it fostered.The wait for Apichatpong Weerasethakul's long gestating project with Tilda Swinton, entitled Memoria, is nearly over. The film has finally gone to camera, and Variety provides a glimpse of the set.Recommended Viewing With The Laundromat, it looks like Soderbergh returns to his (welcomed!) comedic register alongside a stellar cast—Meryl Streep, Gary Oldman, and Sharon Stone
See full article at MUBI »

Richard Gillis, Songwriter on 'The Ballad of Cable Hogue,' Dies at 80

Richard Gillis, Songwriter on 'The Ballad of Cable Hogue,' Dies at 80
Richard Gillis, a singer, songwriter and composer who worked for Sam Peckinpah on the Western fable The Ballad of Cable Hogue, has died. He was 80.

Gillis died July 31 in Thousand Oaks as a result of complications from a fall at his home in Toluca Lake, his family said. 

For The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), which featured an original score by Jerry Goldsmith, Gillis wrote music and/or lyrics for such songs as "Butterfly Mornings," "Tomorrow Is the Song I Sing" and "Wait for Me, Sunrise," performed by actors Stella Stevens and Jason Robards ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Iconic New York Actor Sylvia Miles Dies at 94

Tony Sokol Jun 12, 2019

Sylvia Miles was the original Sally on the Dick van Dyke Show, and a fixture of New York's entertainment world.

Iconic New York stage and screen scene-stealer Sylvia Miles died at age 94, according to Variety. Miles created a string of incredibly memorable, very New York characters, often with very little screen time. She was on the screen for six minutes in Midnight Cowboy (1969), about five and a half minutes in Farewell, My Lovely (1975), and she was nominated as Best Supporting Actress for both. She only sold two apartments in Wall Street and its sequel Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps. Miles had three short scenes selling Amy Irving to the pickle guy in Crossing Delancey.

Her starring role in Andy Warhol's Heat, is no less memorable, though criminally under-watched. A take on the classic Sunset Boulevard, as if any of Warhol's movies weren't, Miles played the Gloria Swanson
See full article at Den of Geek »

Alvin Sargent, Oscar-Winning ‘Julia’ and ‘Ordinary People’ Screenwriter, Dies at 92

  • Variety
Alvin Sargent, Oscar-Winning ‘Julia’ and ‘Ordinary People’ Screenwriter, Dies at 92
Academy Award winner Alvin Sargent, who penned an extraordinary number of popular and critically successful films, from “Paper Moon” and “Ordinary People” to the “Spider-Man” sequels of the 2000s, died Thursday, his talent agency Gersh confirmed to Variety. He was 92.

Sargent won adapted screenplay Oscars for “Julia” in 1978 and “Ordinary People” in 1981 and was also nominated in the category in 1974 for “Paper Moon.” (He also received Writers Guild awards for all three films.) The writer worked with many of Hollywood’s top directors over the course of his career, including Alan J. Pakula, John Frankenheimer. Paul Newman, Peter Bogdanovich, Sydney Pollack, Fred Zinnemann, Robert Redford, Martin Ritt, Norman Jewison, Stephen Frears and Wayne Wang, though not always when those helmers were doing their best work.

Sargent started as a writer for television but broke into features with his screenplay for 1966’s “Gambit,” a Ronald Neame-directed comedy thriller starring Michael Caine,
See full article at Variety »

Melvin and Howard

What does the American dream mean to you? Hardworking folk just want the job and the house and the family as promised in the ‘old’ Contract With America that began to slip out of reach in the 1970s. To examine the social absurdities at the tacky end of the consumer divide, Bo Goldman and Jonathan Demme’s marvelous film follows Melvin Dummar, a luckless a guy who became an involuntary media sensation. You just want to hug plucky Paul Le Mat and adorable Mary Steenburgen, even though there’s not a thing to be done for them: going to ‘Easy Street’ isn’t so easy, not even after being named in a billionaire’s Last Will and Testament.

Melvin and Howard

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1980 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 95 min. / Street Date April 16, 2019 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Paul Le Mat, Mary Steenburgen, Jason Robards, Elizabeth Cheshire, Pamela Reed,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Harvey Sabinson Dead: Broadway League Executive Director And Press Agent Was 94

  • Deadline
Harvey Sabinson Dead: Broadway League Executive Director And Press Agent Was 94
Harvey Sabinson, one of Broadway’s legendary press agents and a former long-time executive director of The Broadway League, died on April 18 of natural causes at his residence in Sarasota, Florida. He was 94 years old. Sabinson capped a 50-year career in the theater when he was honored with a Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1995. That year he stepped down as executive director of the League of American Theatres and Producers, (now known as the Broadway League) a national trade association of theatrical producers, presenters and theatre operators. Sabinson joined the organization early in 1976, when it was known as the League of New York Theatres and Producers, as director of special projects. Prior to this appointment, he spent 30 years as a theatrical publicist, beginning shortly after his discharge from Army service during World War II, during which time he received a Purple Heart. He became executive director in 1982. In
See full article at Deadline »

Mahershala Ali (‘Green Book’) becomes 83rd Best Supporting Actor winner, joining Sam Rockwell, Christoph Waltz, Christian Bale and…

Mahershala Ali (‘Green Book’) becomes 83rd Best Supporting Actor winner, joining Sam Rockwell, Christoph Waltz, Christian Bale and…
Mahershala Ali added another Oscar as Best Supporting Actor to his shelf for his role as a talented concert pianist traveling through the 1960s South in “Green Book.” The victory comes just two years after his first win in the category for “Moonlight” (2016). He became the 83rd person in history to clinch that prize, beating out Adam Driver (“BlacKkKlansman”), Sam Elliott (“A Star Is Born”), Richard E. Grant (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”) and Sam Rockwell (“Vice”). Tour our photo gallery above of every Academy Award winner for Best Supporting Actor, from the most recent winner to the very first one.

SEE2019 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 91st Academy Awards

The supporting categories were added in 1936 at the ninth Academy Awards. Initially, winners were given plaques instead of gold statuettes, but starting in 1943 they were given full Oscars.

Since 1936, only eight actors have won this prize more than once.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Actually perfect in every way: Mahershala Ali is the 7th actor with a 2-for-2 Oscar record

Actually perfect in every way: Mahershala Ali is the 7th actor with a 2-for-2 Oscar record
Mahershala Ali‘s second Oscar triumph Sunday night, for Best Supporting Actor in “Green Book,” puts him some exclusive company: He is the seventh performer to maintain a perfect 2-for-2 record.

Only six other actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

Since he won his first Best Supporting Actor Oscar two years ago for “Moonlight,” Ali has the second shortest gap between wins of this group,
See full article at Gold Derby »

How many times have both Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress gone to the same film at the Oscars?

How many times have both Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress gone to the same film at the Oscars?
On film in contention at this year’s Oscars earned nominations for both Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress: “Vice.” How likely is it that both Sam Rockwell and Amy Adams will win Academy Awards on Feb. 24? In the 82 years since the supporting awards were introduced at the 9th Oscars, featured players from the same film have prevailed just eight times:

Kim Hunter and Karl Malden for “A Streetcar Named Desire” – 1951

Donna Reed and Frank Sinatra for “From Here to Eternity” – 1954

Miyoshi Umeki and Red Buttons for “Sayonara” – 1958

Rita Moreno and George Chakiris for “West Side Story” – 1962

Cloris Leachman and Ben Johnson for “The Last Picture Show” – 1972

Vanessa Redgrave and Jason Robards for “Julia” in 1978

Dianne Wiest and Michael Caine for “Hannah and Her Sisters” – 1987

Melissa Leo and Christian Bale for “The Fighter” – 2011

Adams was also nominated for “The Fighter” and Bale is up again this year for his
See full article at Gold Derby »

14 Stars Who’ve Played Abraham Lincoln, From Henry Fonda to Daniel Day-Lewis (Photos)

  • The Wrap
14 Stars Who’ve Played Abraham Lincoln, From Henry Fonda to Daniel Day-Lewis (Photos)
“Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.” That Abraham Lincoln quote sums up the quiet, thoughtful dignity that actors have tried to portray on film for several generations now. And on screen, the 16th president has done everything from meeting Shirley Temple to fighting vampires. In honor of President’s Day, here are some of the actors who have played Honest Abe over the years.

Joseph Henabery – “The Birth of a Nation” (1915)

The racism in “The Birth of a Nation” aside, D.W. Griffith stages the assassination of Abraham Lincoln as a true national tragedy, and he does so in ravishing display, staging a scene everyone already knows but hadn’t yet visualized on film, using never before seen intercutting and sweeping wide shots as John Wilkes Booth dives from the balcony to provide ravishing tension and action.

Walter Huston – “Abraham Lincoln” (1930)

D.
See full article at The Wrap »

Double Supporting Actress Oscar nominations for ‘The Favourite’: Will Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone vote-split?

Double Supporting Actress Oscar nominations for ‘The Favourite’: Will Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone vote-split?
While it is a common complaint that there aren’t enough good roles for women in films nowadays, “The Favourite” had the reverse problem in that it had almost too many good roles for actresses. The film offers Oscar caliber roles for three performers as it tells the tale of Queen Anne and two women who compete to be her “favourite.” The film inspired a lot of debate in the early days of the Oscar derby as to what categories the film would campaign its three actresses. Ultimately it was decided to place Olivia Colman in Best Actress and Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz in Best Supporting Actress. All three were nominated, thus placing Stone and Weisz in direct competition with each other. In taking a look back on Oscar history since the supporting categories were introduced at the 9th ceremony, are Stone and Weisz in danger of splitting the vote?
See full article at Gold Derby »

26 Stars Who Only Need a Grammy to Egot, From Liza Minnelli to Al Pacino (Photos)

  • The Wrap
26 Stars Who Only Need a Grammy to Egot, From Liza Minnelli to Al Pacino (Photos)
The Egot — an acronym for Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony — is the greatest honor in entertainment. These stars are (or were) close to achieving it.

Jack Albertson

Anne Bancroft

Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982)Emmy: Single Performance by an Actress, “Startime” (1960); Actress in Limited Series or Special, “A Woman Called Golda” (1982).Oscar: Actress, “Gaslight” (1944); Actress, “Anastasia” (1956); Supporting Actress, “Murder on the Orient Express” (1974).Tony: Actress (Dramatic), “Joan of Lorraine” (1947).No Grammys to Egot.

Shirley Booth

Ralph Burns Ellen Burstyn Viola Davis (1965 – ) Emmy: Actress in a Drama Series, “How to Get Away With Murder” (2015).Oscar: Actress, “Fences” (2016).Tony: Featured Actress in a Play, “King Hedley II” (2001); Actress in a Play, “Fences” (2010).No Grammys for Egot. Melvyn Douglas

Bob Fosse

Jeremy Irons (1948 – )

Emmy: Voiceover Performance, “The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century” (1997); Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie, “Elizabeth I” (2006); Narrator, “Big Cat Week” (2014).Oscar: Actor, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990).Tony: Actor in a Play,
See full article at The Wrap »

The 2-for-2 Oscar club could welcome Mahershala Ali, Rachel Weisz

The 2-for-2 Oscar club could welcome Mahershala Ali, Rachel Weisz
Mary Poppins is practically perfect in every way, but Mahershala Ali and Rachel Weisz could be actually perfect at the Oscars. The Oscar winners are on the verge of their second nominations, for “Green Book” and “The Favourite,” respectively, and could become the seventh and eighth actors to have a 2-for-2 record.

Only six actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

Two
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mahershala Ali (‘Green Book’) could win a 2nd Oscar faster than any actor in 24 years

Mahershala Ali (‘Green Book’) could win a 2nd Oscar faster than any actor in 24 years
Mahershala Ali is comfortably out front to win the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for “Green Book” after his wins at the Golden Globes and Critics’ Choice Awards. But there remains a big unanswered question about this race: will the academy want to reward him again so soon? It has been just two years since he won for “Moonlight.” That’s not unprecedented, of course, but you have to go back decades to find actors who claimed two Oscars so quickly.

No one has won multiple acting Oscars in two years or less in any category since Tom Hanks went back-to-back in the Best Actor race: “Philadelphia” (1993) and “Forrest Gump” (1994) — that’s 24 years ago. You have to go back a lot farther than that to find such a quick repeat specifically in the Best Supporting Actor race. It happened to Jason Robards 41 years ago when he won two in a
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘A Star is Born’ will make Oscar history if it wins 3 acting awards and Best Picture

‘A Star is Born’ will make Oscar history if it wins 3 acting awards and Best Picture
A Star is Born” is predicted to win three of the four acting awards and Best Picture at the Oscars. We expect that leads Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper as well as supporting player Sam Elliott will all take home Academy Awards. The casts of only two other films in the 90-year history of the Oscars have pulled off such a feat — “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951) and “Network” (1976) — and neither of those films claimed the top prize.

A Streetcar Named Desire” won a second Best Actress Oscar for Vivien Leigh (she’d picked up her first in 1939 for “Gone With the Wind”) and the supporting acting awards for Kim Hunter and Karl Malden. However Marlon Brando, who was recreating his breakout stage role of Stanley Kowalski, lost the Best Actor race to Humphrey Bogart (“The African Queen”). And the film fell to the frothy MGM musical “An American in Paris.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Melvin Dummar Dies: Inspiration For Jonathan Demme’s ‘Melvin And Howard’ Was 74

  • Deadline
Melvin Dummar Dies: Inspiration For Jonathan Demme’s ‘Melvin And Howard’ Was 74
Melvin Dummar, the man who inspired Jonathan Demme’s 1980 dramedy Melvin and Howard, died December 9 in hospice care in Nevada. He was 74.

Dummar was known as the man who argued that Howard Hughes bequeathed him over $150 million after he rescued him on a deserted road and drove him to Las Vegas in 1967. In the alleged hand-written “Mormon will”, the Hughes estate also left The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a beneficiary of the inheritance. Dummar battled cancer for years and quit referring to the document after losing the legal battle nearly a decade ago. Jurors and judges decided that Dummar lied and a U.S. appeals court in 2008 signed off on the decision that a Nevada state court jury 30 years ago said that the will was fake.

The story was the inspiration for Demme’s Melvin and Howard in 1980. The movie starred Paul Le Mat, Jason Robards,
See full article at Deadline »

Faye Dunaway Announces Return To Broadway As Katharine Hepburn

  • Deadline
Faye Dunaway Announces Return To Broadway As Katharine Hepburn
Faye Dunaway is coming back to Broadway. And she’ll be playing Katharine Hepburn.

In a brief and surprise announcement, producer Ben Feldman dropped the news that Dunaway, after an absence of more than 35 years from the Broadway stage, will play Hepburn in the Broadway premiere next summer of playwright Matthew Lombardo’s one-woman-play Tea at Five. The play, in a new version by Lombardo written for this production, will be directed by the Tony-nominated John Tillinger.

Tea at Five will play a strictly limited engagement in the summer of 2019. Additional information, including the complete creative team, dates, and theater will be announced early next year.

The announcement comes on the very day that director Ivo van Hove’s Broadway production of Network is set to open. The 1976 film version won Dunaway an Oscar.

Dunaway’s last appearance on Broadway was in 1982’s The Curse of an Aching Heart, a
See full article at Deadline »

Review: Sam Peckinpah's "The Ballad Of Cable Hogue" (1970); Warner Archive Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

Sam Peckinpah’s “The Ballad of Cable Hogue,” (1970) recently released on Blu-ray by the Warner Archive Collection, is a movie that doesn’t fit neatly into any specific category. Peckinpah, more notable for his violent action pictures about outlaws who’ve run out their string and go down in a blaze of glory, maintained that “Hogue” is a comedy. But co-star Stella Stevens, in an interview included on this Blu-Ray release, disagrees. She claims it’s a love story—a tragic love story. The answer, in my opinion, is that it probably falls somewhere in between. It’s both a comedy and a love story, and as such, is probably the most honest film about the human condition the hard-nosed Peckinpah ever made.

The story is a simple one. Jason Robards plays the titular character, a man left to die in the Arizona desert by two disreputable partners,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Douglas Rain, Voice of Hal 9000 in ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ Dies at 90 — Here’s Why Stanley Kubrick Cast Him

Douglas Rain, Voice of Hal 9000 in ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ Dies at 90 — Here’s Why Stanley Kubrick Cast Him
Douglas Rain, the Canadian actor and narrator best known for voicing the role of Hal 9000 in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” has died at age 90. The Stratford Festival, which Rain co-founded in 1952, confirmed his passing. Rain died from natural causes in Stratford, Ontario.

“Canadian theatre has lost one of its greatest talents and a guiding light in its development,” the Stratford Festival artistic director Antoni Cimolino said in a press release. “Douglas Rain was that rare artist: an actor deeply admired by other actors.”

Rain voiced Hal 9000 in Kubrick’s “2001” and the sequel, “2010: The Year We Make Contact,” directed by Peter Hyams. The actor also received a Tony nomination in 1972 for his role in Robert Bolt’s production of “Vivat! Vivat! Regina!” Rain recorded his voice work on “2001” in post-production. The actor was not cast as the intelligent robot until late in production. Radio broadcaster Alistair Cooke
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Election-Themed Movies to Watch When You’re Finished Voting in the Midterms

  • Indiewire
10 Election-Themed Movies to Watch When You’re Finished Voting in the Midterms
As you may have heard, there’s an election today. Its importance is impossible to overstate no matter which side of the political aisle you’re on, and Bill Hader thinks you’d be “a moron” not to vote. Our imperfect electoral system has inspired many great movies over the years, a few of which celebrate it but most of which either lampoon it or show how vulnerable it is. After you, being the responsible citizen you clearly are, fulfill your civic duty by voting in the midterm election today, take a break from anxiously watching the results by watching one of these 10 films instead.

“All the President’s Men”

The soft glow of Deep Throat’s cigarette in a shadowy garage; Ben Bradlee’s (Jason Robards) “Okay we go with it” order to Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) as his elevator doors lightly close in
See full article at Indiewire »
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