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‘Pain and Glory’ and the Art of Pedro Almodóvar’s World

In Pain and Glory, Pedro Almodóvar’s 21st feature and his eighth with Antonio Banderas, the star plays Salvador, an aging filmmaker struggling to continue working due to an oppressive cocktail of pain and his new habit for heroin. A repertory screening of his breakthrough film, Taste, gives way for Salvador to face various, unreconciled fragments of his past: his late mother’s chilly regard for him, his budding sexuality, and his first relationship, as well as a tumultuous friendship with an estranged collaborator.

Almodóvar’s cinema is an amass of messy folks in flux, like Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown’s Pepa or Volver’s Raimunda, suddenly trying, the best way they know how, to pacify inharmonious, frayed strands of their lives. In an interview at the 72nd Cannes Film Festival, Banderas said this film, more than an addiction narrative, is about closing the circles and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Back to One, Episode 76: Carroll Baker

Carroll Baker’s work in Elia Kazan’s Baby Doll and Jack Garfein’s Something Wild is just as impressive and valuable as any performance delivered by her legendary Actors Studio contemporaries Marlon Brando and James Dean. So why isn’t she talked about in the same way? After the simultaneous sensation and scandal of Baby Doll (it was condemned by the Legion of Decency), Baker became a star, but she spent most of her career either avoiding sex-symbol roles or begrudgingly accepting them. Despite a handful of other great performances, conflicts with studios, producers, and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Back to One, Episode 76: Carroll Baker

Carroll Baker’s work in Elia Kazan’s Baby Doll and Jack Garfein’s Something Wild is just as impressive and valuable as any performance delivered by her legendary Actors Studio contemporaries Marlon Brando and James Dean. So why isn’t she talked about in the same way? After the simultaneous sensation and scandal of Baby Doll (it was condemned by the Legion of Decency), Baker became a star, but she spent most of her career either avoiding sex-symbol roles or begrudgingly accepting them. Despite a handful of other great performances, conflicts with studios, producers, and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Nicholas Kazan Tells Writers Guild He’s ‘Trying to Stop a Trainwreck’

  • Variety
Oscar-nominated screenwriter Nicholas Kazan has asserted he’s trying to prevent the potential destruction of the Writers Guild of America over its bitter dispute with Hollywood agents.

Kazan, who is running for the WGA West board, issued the statement in an email Friday to members. He’s part of the dissident Writers Forward Together slate, which is running on a platform that the WGA needs to resume negotiations with the major agencies after staying away from talks since early June.

“I have friends who aren’t speaking to me because I’m running and advocating a change in tactics,” Kazan said. “They think I’m being disloyal, harming the Guild. All I can say is: Loyalty does not mean blind obedience. Sometimes it means trying to stop a trainwreck.”

Kazan’s missive came a day after ballots went out to about 10,000 WGA West members. Results will be announced on Sept.
See full article at Variety »

Screenwriter Nicholas Kazan Warns: Writers Guild Could Be Torn Apart

  • Variety
Oscar-nominated screenwriter Nicholas Kazan has warned that the leaders of the Writers Guild of America may tear apart the union.

Kazan, who is running for the WGA West board, issued the prediction in an email Monday to members following the Aug. 16 that the announcement that the WGA would start holding tribunals to punish writers who are not following the guild directive to fire agents if the agents have not agreed to follow the WGA’s Code of Conduct — which bans packaging fees and affiliate productions.

“This disaster was both inevitable and avoidable,” Kazan said. “Inevitable once the Guild embarked on its present course…and avoidable if the same legitimate issues had been dealt with in a different, less confrontational and more reasoned, manner. If trials are held and hundreds of writers are punished…or they abandon the Guild to avoid a nasty trial…the WGA will be defanged, its power diminished,
See full article at Variety »

‘Helter Skelter’ Star Steve Railsback: The First Manson Actor Looks Back

‘Helter Skelter’ Star Steve Railsback: The First Manson Actor Looks Back
Fifty years ago this month, Steve Railsback was a 23-year-old actor in New York when he caught a newspaper headline that Sharon Tate and four others had been brutally massacred in a house in L.A. “I remember thinking, ‘God, what’s happening in this fucking world?’” Railsback recalls.

Seven years later, in 1976, Railsback would be part of one of the first attempts to depict what transpired that horrific night. In the two-part TV movie Helter Skelter, based on the Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry best-seller about Charles Manson, his Family,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Writers Guild Leaders Accused of ‘Vitriol’: ‘The Guild Is in Crisis’

  • Variety
Oscar-nominated screenwriter Nicholas Kazan has attacked leaders of the Writers Guild of America for “vitriol” in their hardline stance on Hollywood agents.

“This Guild is in crisis,” he said in an email sent Monday to members. “It’s not the crisis you think…it’s not whether or how to negotiate with the Ata or the individual talent agencies. The crisis is internal. The agency campaign has divided membership in a dangerous and unprecedented way, turning writer against writer, friend against friend…in an atmosphere dominated by distrust and vitriol.”

Kazan, who is the father of actress and writer Zoe Kazan and the son of Oscar-winning director Elia Kazan, is part of the WGA Forward Together slate. His group is contending that the WGA needs to get back to the bargaining table after two months of staying away from bargaining. WGA West president David Goodman declared on June 20 that the
See full article at Variety »

The Best Movies New to Every Major Streaming Platform in August 2019

Netflix may get most of the attention, but it’s hardly a one-stop shop for cinephiles who are looking to stream essential classic and contemporary films. Each of the prominent streaming platforms — and there are more of them all the time — caters to its own niche of film obsessives.

From chilling horror fare on Shudder, to the boundless wonders of the Criterion Channel, and esoteric (but unmissable) festival hits on Film Movement Plus and Ovid.tv, IndieWire’s monthly guide will highlight the best of what’s coming to every major streaming site, with an eye towards exclusive titles that may help readers decide which of these services is right for them.

Here’s the best of the best for August 2019.

Amazon Prime

There are some big new movies coming to Amazon Prime this month, but most of these recent Hollywood titles will also be available to stream on Hulu and/or Netflix.
See full article at Indiewire »

Stacy Keach on Shakespeare, Stardom and His Walk of Fame Honor

  • Variety
Stacy Keach on Shakespeare, Stardom and His Walk of Fame Honor
Six decades into his career, Stacy Keach is finally receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The 78-year-old actor muscled into notoriety playing everyone from Hamlet to Hemingway to Mike Hammer. When the New York Times spotted the then-27-year-old up-and-comer in “Henry IV,” it gushed that his “superb” Falstaff was “so freshly observed that it is almost a new character.”

In the late 1960s, Keach was hailed as America’s Laurence Olivier — right when the country decided it didn’t need one. His agent, the powerhouse Sue Mengers, gave him the truth: “Come out of your ivory tower. Forget the classics. Get to Hollywood.”

He obeyed, and today Keach is best-known for playing heavyweights who tend to kill and be killed on film and TV, where the camera can closely observe his intimidating build, defining harelip and what Elia Kazan called “a sense of violence behind the eyes that’s not housebroken.
See full article at Variety »

Giveaway – Win A Tree Grows In Brooklyn on Blu-ray

Eureka Entertainment releases A Tree Grows In

Brooklyn, Elia Kazan’s heartfelt and sentimental first feature, presented on Blu-ray from a 2K restoration as a part of The Masters of Cinema Series from 22 July 2019. We’ve got three copies to give away, so read on for details of how to enter…

Director Elia Kazan’s first film, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn shows that the filmmaker’s great empathy for his characters was already quite evident at this early juncture, and this endures as one of the most moving Hollywood dramas of the 1940s. Based on Betty Smith’s novel – a bestseller in the U.S. but also one of the most popular books among American soldiers overseas in WWII – Kazan’s debut is a sensitive, masterful adaptation.

Set among Brooklyn tenements circa 1912, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a portrait of the Nolans, an Irish-American family living in financially challenging circumstances,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rip Torn: One of the Last Hollywood Hellraisers

Jim Knipfel Jul 10, 2019

We look back on Rip Torn's career and how the occasional troublemaker turned bit parts into leading roles.

In the summer of 1969, Rip Torn was drunkenly screaming through New York’s West Village on his motorcycle when he slammed it into a police cruiser. Torn broke his leg in the accident but didn’t notice. The next morning, he got up, got on a plane, and flew to Paris where he was set to star in Joseph Strick’s film version of Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer. He shot the entire film all hopped up on painkillers for an untreated leg. And you know what? He still gives a remarkable performance. It wasn’t the only time he worked with broken bones either.

For over 60 years, Rip Torn carried on in the proud tradition of John Barrymore, Errol Flynn, Robert Mitchum, Frank Sinatra, and Lawrence Tierney
See full article at Den of Geek »

Rip Torn: Fearless Film, TV, and Stage Actor Dies at 88

Tony Sokol Jul 10, 2019

Rip Torn, who played characters from Judas Iscariot to the producer on The Larry Sanders Show, dies at 88.

Respected and versatile character actor Rip Torn died Tuesday in Lakeville, Conn., according to Variety. Publicist Rick Miramontez did not release a cause of death, but said Torn was with his wife, Amy Wright, and two daughters, Katie and Angelica. He was 88.

Torn believed actors should “play drama as comedy and comedy as drama,” according to the statement, and the actor was equally at home both. He starred in comedies like Albert Brooks' Defending Your Life and the Men in Black films, as well as TV comedies 30 Rock, playing General Electric CEO Don Geiss, mentor to Alec Baldwin’s Jack Donaghy, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.

Torn won an Emmy for his part in HBO's The Larry Sanders Show, and was nominated for a Tony award in
See full article at Den of Geek »

Rip Torn Dead At Age 88

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Actor Rip Torn has died at age 88. He was a volatile figure in the entertainment industry, known for his sometimes bizarre behavior as well as his brilliant performances. A native Texan, he gravitated to  New York City in the 1950s where he studied under Lee Strasberg at the legendary Actors Studio. He was championed by director Elia Kazan, who gave Torn high profile roles in his stage and film productions. Torn gained major acclaim with a Tony-nominated performance on Broadway in "Sweet Bird of Youth", a role he would reprise in the 1963 film version. Torn's film career occasionally saw him attain leading man status but he remained a highly acclaimed supporting actor throughout his career. His feature films include "A Face in the Crowd", "Baby Doll", "The Cincinnati Kid", "Pork Chop Hill", "King of Kings", "Beach Red", "Coming Apart", "Tropic of Cancer", "Crazy Joe", "The Man Who Fell to Earth
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Rip Torn, Veteran Actor and "Larry Sanders Show" Star, Dead at 88

Rip Torn, Veteran Actor and
Rip Torn ­– whose seven-decade acting career spanned stage, film, TV and voice roles – has died, a rep for the actor confirmed in a statement to Rolling Stone. Torn died at his home in Lakeville, Connecticut on Tuesday afternoon. He was 88.

Born Elmore Rual Torn Jr. in Temple, Texas on February 6th, 1931, he graduated from University of Texas, where he studied acting before serving in the United States Army.

Torn moved to Hollywood, California, where he scored his first major acting role in 1956 film, Baby Doll. He later moved to New
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Rip Torn Dies: ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Emmy Winner & Broadway Veteran Was 88

  • Deadline
Rip Torn Dies: ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Emmy Winner & Broadway Veteran Was 88
Rip Torn, who played Garry Shandling’s profane, fiercely loyal producer on HBO’s The Larry Sanders Show, co-starred in the original Men in Black films and was a major star of Broadway and Off Broadway during a seven-decade career, died today surrounded by family at his home in Lakeville, Ct. He was 88.

The prolific Torn played the unstoppable and unflappable Artie on Larry Sanders, which aired from 1992-98 and followed the behind-the-scenes and onstage antics of a successful late-night network talk show. Along with scoring a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Emmy in 1996, he was nominated for each of the show’s six seasons.

The year Torn won his Emmy, he also had been up for Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his turn on CBSChicago Hope. In 2008, he earned his ninth and final Emmy nom, for his recurring role as Don Geiss on NBC’s 30 Rock.
See full article at Deadline »

Rip Torn, ‘Men in Black,’ ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Star, Dies at 88

  • Variety
Rip Torn, ‘Men in Black,’ ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Star, Dies at 88
Actor Rip Torn, who earned Oscar and Tony nominations as well as an Emmy Award and two Obies, has died Tuesday in Lakeville Conn., his representative confirmed. He was 88.

Torn was equally at home in the comedy of the “Men in Black” film series or TV’s “The Larry Sanders Show” (for which he won his Emmy) and in the drama of “Sweet Bird of Youth” or “Anna Christie,” to name two of the numerous classic works of theater in which he appeared.

The actor was nominated for a supporting-actor Oscar in 1984 for his work as a father who confronts tragedy in Martin Ritt’s “Cross Creek,” one of many rural dramas in which he appeared during his career.

He drew a Tony nomination in 1960 for his first performance on Broadway, as the sadistic son of the town boss in Elia Kazan’s original production of Tennessee Williams’ “Sweet Bird of Youth.
See full article at Variety »

Rip Torn, Actor Known for ‘Men in Black’ and ‘The Larry Sanders Show,’ Dies at 88

  • The Wrap
Rip Torn, Actor Known for ‘Men in Black’ and ‘The Larry Sanders Show,’ Dies at 88
Rip Torn, a prolific actor best known for HBO’s “The Larry Sanders Show” and the “Men in Black” franchise, died Tuesday at his home in Lakeville, Connecticut, his representatives said. He was 88.

In a career spanning more than six decades, Torn established himself as a versatile performer, appearing in 10 Broadway plays (and directing one), more than 80 feature films, and dozens of television shows.

Born Elmore Rual Torn Jr. in Temple, Texas in 1931, Torn studied acting at Texas A&m and the University of Texas, and served a stint in the Army before heading to Los Angeles in the mid-1950s. He made his film debut with an uncredited role in Elia Kazan’s 1956 film “Baby Doll,” before relocating to New York City to study at the Actor’s Studio.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2019 (Photos)

Torn made his Broadway debut in 1959 as part of the original cast of Tennessee Williams
See full article at The Wrap »

George Cukor movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘My Fair Lady,’ ‘A Star Is Born’

  • Gold Derby
George Cukor movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘My Fair Lady,’ ‘A Star Is Born’
In a career spanning more than half a century, he directed films in almost every genre – screwball comedy, musical, film noir, thriller, literary adaptations. With his gentle nature, he coaxed 21 actors to Oscar nominations (with five winning), helmed seven films nominated for Best Picture (with one win), and was himself nominated for Best Director five times (with one win).

Acclaimed director George Cukor was born on July 7, 1899, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in New York City to Hungarian-Jewish immigrants. As a child, he became infatuated with the theater and performed in amateur plays, once with future friend and mentor David O. Selznick. His father was an attorney, and Cukor was expected to follow in his path; however, he did not last long in law school, and soon found odd jobs in theater houses. He co-founded a stock company and alternated between directing shows for that and some for Broadway.
See full article at Gold Derby »

George Cukor movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
George Cukor movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best
In a career spanning more than half a century, he directed films in almost every genre – screwball comedy, musical, film noir, thriller, literary adaptations. With his gentle nature, he coaxed 21 actors to Oscar nominations (with five winning), helmed seven films nominated for Best Picture (with one win), and was himself nominated for Best Director five times (with one win).

Acclaimed director George Cukor was born on July 7, 1899, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in New York City to Hungarian-Jewish immigrants. As a child, he became infatuated with the theater and performed in amateur plays, once with future friend and mentor David O. Selznick. His father was an attorney, and Cukor was expected to follow in his path; however, he did not last long in law school, and soon found odd jobs in theater houses. He co-founded a stock company and alternated between directing shows for that and some for Broadway.
See full article at Gold Derby »

The 8 Best Movies About Television — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

This week sees the (limited) release of “Late Night,” which is set in the wild and revealing world of late night TV. It’s the latest of many examples of how the movies have sometimes been able to see television more clearly than television has been able to see itself.

This week’s question: What is the best movie ever made about television?

A Face in the Crowd

Q.V. Hough (@QVHough), Vague Visages, Screen Rant, RogerEbert.com

Released in 1957, Elia Kazan’s “A Face in the Crowd” remains a fascinating study about TV production and celebrity culture. Specifically, the film underlines the idea that trendy celebrities will stay relevant as long as they don’t do anything, well, horrible.

Andy Griffith delivers one of the most powerful feature debut performance as the drifter-turned-celebrity Larry “Lonesome” Rhodes,
See full article at Indiewire »
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