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Francis Ford Coppola Recalls How Conflicts, Racial Politics Hurt ‘The Cotton Club’ – New York Film Festival

  • Deadline
Francis Ford Coppola Recalls How Conflicts, Racial Politics Hurt ‘The Cotton Club’ – New York Film Festival
Francis Ford Coppola wished his old frenemy Robert Evans could have made the trip to a screening of The Cotton Club Encore, the new version of the 1984 film that Coppola spent half a million dollars of his own money to re-edit, expand and re-release.

Coppola directed and Evans produced the original film about the famed Harlem nightclub operated by New York gangster Owney Madden, where black entertainers from Duke Ellington to Cab Calloway performed to white-only audiences.

Despite a star-studded cast, the production as he described it was a messy stew of editorial conflict, shady financing, lawsuits and too many scenes on the cutting room floor.

Thirty-five years later, Coppola has reinserted 35 minutes of footage he said distributors weren’t comfortable with at the time.

“They said. ‘It’s too long, there’s too much tap dancing, too many black people,
See full article at Deadline »

10 Things You Didn’t Know About The Munsters

New horror shows come on every year, but one oldie that some people watch yearly is The Munsters: first released in 1964 and starring Fred Gwynne, Al Lewis, Yvonne De Carlo, Butch Patrick, and Beverley Owen/Pat Priest as Herman Munster, Grandpa, Lily Munster, Eddie Munster, and Marilyn Munster respectively.

Related: The Munsters TV Show Reboot Being Developed by Seth Meyers

The series was popular for CBS from the get go, but became even more famous through re-runs. The series ran for two years until it was canceled in 1966, resulting in a total of 70 episodes. There have been a few attempts to reboot it over the years, but nothing has been even close to being as popular as the original series. Despite becoming an iconic show in American culture, there are some things you might have missed. Here are 10 things you may not have known about The Munsters.
See full article at Screen Rant »

5 Best & Worst Episodes Of The Munsters (According To IMDb)

Back in the ‘60s, a show was released called The Munsters that focused on an unconventional American family. The series starred Fred Gwynne, Yvonne De Carlo, Al Lewis, Butch Patrick, and Beverly Owen/Pat Priest as members of the Munster family, who are all monsters (besides Marilyn). The series was created as a parody of shows like Leave It To Beaver as well as Universal’s classic monster movies that were released decades before.

The Munsters saw competition from ABC’s The Addams Family, but both shows are remembered fondly today. The Munsters has lived on over the years through re-runs, but some episodes are better than others on IMDb. Here are the 5 Best And Worst Episodes Of The Munsters (According To IMDb).

Related: 15 Things You Didn't Know About The Universal Monster Movies
See full article at Screen Rant »

‘The Cotton Club Encore’ Trailer Previews Francis Ford Coppola’s New Restored Reworking

As Francis Ford Coppola continues to prep for his long-gestating sci-fi epic Megalopolis, the director has been looking back his career. After restoring Tucker: The Man and His Dream, he reworked and restored Apocalypse Now, and now he’s returning to his 1930s-set musical-meets-crime drama with The Cotton Club Encore. Following the inner workings of a Harlem jazz club, the film wasn’t a hit upon its 1984 release, but now Coppola has spent about a half a million of his own dime to restore the image and sound, as well as re-edit the project to include the originally-envisioned ending, new dance numbers, and more.

“I always felt that the movie got cut down; there was 25 or 30 minutes taken out and a lot of the black story got cut out. I found the Betamax of the original cut. I don’t think in the release version of The Cotton Club you
See full article at The Film Stage »

Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘The Cotton Club’ Is Returning to Theaters With Director’s Cut

Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘The Cotton Club’ Is Returning to Theaters With Director’s Cut
A new cut of Francis Ford Coppola’s 1984 crime drama “The Cotton Club” is set to hit theaters this fall following a bow at the 2019 New York Film Festival. “The Cotton Club” stars Richard Gere, Diane Lane, Gregory Hines, Bob Hoskins, Laurence Fishburne and Nicolas Cage and is set in 1930s Harlem at the legendary jazz venue from which it takes its name. For the initial release, Coppola bent to outside concerns that he edit the film to focus solely on Gere’s character Dixie Dwyer. The Director’s Cut will presumably hew closer to the filmmaker’s original intent, which was to focus just as much on the character played by Gregory Hines, a dancer named Delbert “Sandman” Williams.

The official synopsis for the re-release reads: “In this lavish, 1930s-era drama, Harlem’s legendary Cotton Club becomes a hotbed of passion and violence as the lives and loves of entertainers and gangsters collide.
See full article at Indiewire »

Class of 1989: Looking at Zelda as the Frightening Personification of Death in Pet Sematary

  • DailyDead
[We're celebrating some of the most memorable horror and sci-fi movies of 1989 this month in Daily Dead's Class of 89 retrospective series! Check back on Daily Dead throughout the rest of August for more special features celebrating the 30th anniversaries of a wide range of horror and sci-fi films!]

Pet Sematary is a movie with numerous monsters. We have Church, the undead cat; Pascow, who, though he serves as something of a supernatural guide, is also a very unsettling apparition; Gage, after he has been resurrected; and the dark power of the burial ground itself. Each of these elements impacts the story in a different way, but they are all present and serve a purpose in the narrative. And that purpose is Death itself. Each of these emissaries is yet another warning that Death has its sights set on the Creed family and that their tragic fate was sealed the moment they entered their new home.

As frightening as this gang of undead phantoms is, though, perhaps the most memorable and frightening spectre in Mary Lambert’s film is Rachel’s long-dead sister, Zelda (Andrew Hubatsek). In one of the most terrifying scenes in the entire movie, Rachel (Denise Crosby
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: Pet Sematary

  • Comicmix
Stephen King was on a roll when Pet Sematary came out in 1983, with each horror novel seemingly creepier than the last. After all, everyone loves a loyal pet, and many families can recount how they commemorated an animal/fish/bird’s life at death. Turn that domestic normality on its head and you can terrify most everyone. King admitted this was perhaps his most disturbing work, the one where he may have gone too far (which is saying a lot).

The 1989 film adaptation starred Fred Gwynne, Dale Midkiff, and Denise Crosby and did a fairly good job capturing the spirit of the novel. It performed well enough that it spawned a best-forgotten sequel.

And as with all things, it was been remade this spring and is out now on disc from Paramount Home Entertainment.

The premise remains the same: the Creeds have moved into a rural home near the local Pet Sematary.
See full article at Comicmix »

Pet Sematary (1989)

Spoilers for all three Pet Sematary films abound throughout this review. Read on, if you dare.

Tfh Guru Mary Lambert‘s excellent, intense and darkly funny film adaptation of Stephen King’s Pet Sematary debuted on April 21st, 1989. 30 years later, it has terrified untold oodles of pet owners, who’ve no doubt pondered the lengths to which they’d go if their beloved critters were to be, say, leveled by a truck. Beyond birthing millions of nightmares, Pet Sematary has also spawned a solid sequel and a middling remake.

When he gets a cushy new gig as a doctor at the University of Maine, Louis Creed (Dale Midkiff) relocates his wife Rachel, their small children Ellie (Blaze Berdahl) and Gage (Miko Hughes), and Ellie’s beloved cat Church from Chicago to the small town of Ludlow, Maine near the college. The Creed parents look forward to raising their children peacefully,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Return of the (Un)Living Dead: "Pet Sematary"

  • MUBI
“Unbeing dead isn't being alive.”—E. E. Cummings Pet Sematary, Stephen King’s most caliginous work, is unrelenting and unrepentant. The 1983 novel concerns the reanimation of carrion, if not the soul, and the discrepancy between corporeality and true life. It’s a sepulchral work, more ontological than most of King’s fiction, and a depiction of life and death at its simplest, its most existential.Louis Creed is a doctor who has just moved his family from Chicago to central Maine so he can spend more time with his family. His is a logical, scientific mind, while his wife, whose sister died of spinal meningitis when they were children, has a deep-seated fear of death and clings to vestigial notions of a happy afterlife. Louis befriends their elderly neighbor, Jud Crandall, who regales him with stories of halcyon days and becomes something of a surrogate father for Louis. When the Creeds’ cat,
See full article at MUBI »

The Stars of 'Pet Sematary': Where Are They Now?

The Stars of 'Pet Sematary': Where Are They Now?
It's been 30 years since the first chilling adaptation of Stephen King's Pet Sematary hit theaters in 1989. 

The film follows the Creed family after Louis (Dale Midkiff) moves his wife, Rachel (Denise Crosby), and two children from Chicago to rural Ludlow, Maine for a new job. When the Creeds' cat gets hit on the busy road next to the family's new home one day, Louis' older neighbor Jud (Fred Gwynne) reveals an Indian burial ground that may be able to bring it back.

The cat returns, but there's something noticeably sinister about it, and ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Movie Review – Pet Sematary (1989), Pet Sematary Two (1992) and Pet Sematary (2019)

Shaun Munro reviews all three Pet Sematary movies…

The Pet Sematary remake is in cinemas now, so as well as offering up our opinion on the new movie, what better time to revisit both the 1989 Stephen King adaptation which brought the story to the masses, and also the ill-fated sequel that most audiences have long since forgotten?

Pet Sematary (1989)

Directed by Mary Lambert.

Starring Dale Midkiff, Fred Gwynne, Denise Crosby, Brad Greenquist, Michael Lombard, Miko Hughes and Blaze Berdahl.

For those opting to watch the 1989 Pet Sematary for the first time in anticipation of the remake’s release – this critic included – it’s practically impossible not to view Mary Lambert’s film as lousily dated; a curio relic for sure, albeit not always for good reason.

A number of frustrations are immediately apparent – for starters, the performances are almost uniformly wooden across the board, with only Fred Gwynne getting away
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Pet Sematary’ Review: Stephen King’s Classic Novel Comes Back to Life

‘Pet Sematary’ Review: Stephen King’s Classic Novel Comes Back to Life
What if your favorite pet died and you buried it in a place where it could come back to life? It’d maybe be a little different — and definitely a lot scarier — but hey, it’s still your beloved pooch, kitty or tweety bird, right? Bonus question: What if the same applied to humans? That was the premise of Stephen King’s hair-raising 1983 novel, a fan favorite that never achieved the above-the-board status of, say, The Shining or Carrie. (Even the author himself thought the book was way too dark.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

How Original 'Pet Sematary' Director Won Over Stephen King

How Original 'Pet Sematary' Director Won Over Stephen King
“Sometimes dead is better.”

It’s Fred Gwynne’s classic line from Stephen King’s Pet Sematary that everyone loves to quote in their best Mainer accent. Now, 30 years after the Paramount film’s release, director Mary Lambert is stirring the soil with memories of making her first major horror hit, and she explains why she jumped at the chance to digitally sweeten elements of the pic for a remastered edition just in time for the 2019 remake, which opens next Friday.

Teased by his publisher as “the most frightening book Stephen King has ever written” in ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Pet Sematary Remake Will Get a Prequel Instead of a Sequel?

Pet Sematary Remake Will Get a Prequel Instead of a Sequel?
Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer's much-anticipated remake of Stephen King's Pet Sematary crawls out of the grave and into your local movie theater next month. Like many of the rest of you guys out there, I missed the film's World Premiere at the SXSW film Festival earlier this month, and so I'm counting down the days until I can sit in a crowded theater and see it reborn for myself. And while we wait, today we already have word that further films may be in the works. Not a sequel mind you, but possibly a prequel if we can believe producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura, who recently said this.

"I generally don't start thinking about [sequels] until they're a success. I think if there's anything here, there's a prequel. I think if you look at the book, we didn't cover all that stuff that happens before the Creed family moves in.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Pet Sematary Remake Is Drenched in Bloody Violence Promises R-Rating

Pet Sematary Remake Is Drenched in Bloody Violence Promises R-Rating
Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer's remake of Stephen King's Pet Sematary is heading our way next month, and we couldn't be more excited. The movie held it's World Premiere at this year's SXSW Film Festival last week and has been snatching up positive reviews left and right ever since. And for all of you guys out there that may have been worried this new take on King's most terrifying novel might go the PG-13 route, no worries as today the MPAA confirmed that Pet Sematary has been slapped with an R-rating for "horror violence, bloody images, and some language."

And thank God, right? I know that spreading the word that Pet Sematary is rated R might not seem like news, but can you imagine if instead of this glorious R-rating we're sharing with you guys today, there had been a PG-13 slapped onto the movie? Mother of God,
See full article at MovieWeb »

New Pet Sematary Photos Creep Into Cursed Side of Stephen King Remake

Next month, Paramount and Starry Eyes directing duo Kevin K&#246lsch and Dennis Widmyer will be unleashing an all-new remake/reimagining/readaptation of It and The Dark Tower author Stephen King's Pet Sematary. Arguably King's scariest novel, Pet Sematary is all set to crawl out of the grave and into the night later this month when it hosts its World Premiere at this year's SXSW Film Festival on March 17th. The much-anticipated film then lurks into a theater near you on April 5, 2019. And to get you guys ready for its release, today we have two spooky new stills from the upcoming remake/readaptation featuring new Louis Creed played by Jason Clarke.

The first still features Jason Clarke wandering, in what appears to be his sleep, through the fog-covered titular cemetery in the middle of the dark woods. Those who have read the book and/or seen the original film know this scene well.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Beverley Owen Dies: ‘The Munsters’ Original Marilyn Was 81

  • Deadline
Beverley Owen Dies: ‘The Munsters’ Original Marilyn Was 81
Beverley Owen, an actress best known for her one-season stint as the beautiful non-monster Marilyn on the CBS classic ’60s sitcom The Munsters, died Feb. 21 at her home in Vermont. She was 81.

Her death was confirmed by her former cast mate Butch Patrick, who played little wolfish boy Eddie Munster on the 1964-66 series.

“Beautiful Beverly [sic] Owen has left us,” Patrick posted on Facebook yesterday. “What a sweet soul. I had the biggest crush on her. Rip Bev and thanks for your 13 memorable Marilyn Munster episodes.”

Owen’s daughter Polly Stone told TMZ that her mother died following a two-year battle with ovarian cancer. The former actress had not publicly disclosed her illness, but was surrounded by friends and family at her Vermont home when she passed, according to Stone.

Stone’s acting career was short-lived. After debuting on As the World Turns and guest starring on a half-dozen other episodic early ’60s series,
See full article at Deadline »

Watch Chilling New Trailer for Stephen King’s ‘Pet Sematary’

Watch Chilling New Trailer for Stephen King’s ‘Pet Sematary’
Stephen King has written a lot of frightening books throughout the course of his five-decade career, but none are quite as viscerally disturbing as Pet Sematary. The 1983 novel is about a doctor that moves to the country with his young family and discovers a pet cemetery in the woods behind his house that somehow brings his dead cat back to life. When his daughter gets killed by a truck, he makes the horrible mistake of seeing if it works on humans.

The book was turned into a 1989 movie starring Dale Midkiff,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

[Set Visit] Details Unearthed on Set of ‘Pet Sematary’; Novel Changes, Easter Eggs and the Return of Zelda

[Set Visit] Details Unearthed on Set of ‘Pet Sematary’; Novel Changes, Easter Eggs and the Return of Zelda
On the set of Pet Sematary, one of the signs that Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer’s adaptation wouldn’t be following the same footsteps as the 1989 film came into focus when we met the new Jud Crandall. It’s difficult to imagine anyone else playing the role after Fred Gwynne, right down to the heavy Maine accent straight from […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz And John Lithgow Star In New Trailer For Pet Sematary

Pet Sematary opens in theatres on April 5, 2019 and Paramount Pictures has released a brand new poster and trailer for the upcoming horror film.

Based on the seminal horror novel by Stephen King, Pet Sematary follows Dr. Louis Creed (Jason Clarke), who, after relocating with his wife Rachel (Amy Seimetz) and their two young children from Boston to rural Maine, discovers a mysterious burial ground hidden deep in the woods near the family’s new home. When tragedy strikes, Louis turns to his unusual neighbor, Jud Crandall (John Lithgow), setting off a perilous chain reaction that unleashes an unfathomable evil with horrific consequences.

The original film, directed by Mary Lambert, was super creepy and written by King, featured Dale Midkiff as Louis Creed, Denise Crosby as Rachel Creed, Blaze Berdahl as Ellie Creed, Miko Hughes as Gage Creed, and Fred Gwynne as Jud Crandall. Andrew Hubatsek was cast for Zelda’s role.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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