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Art Director Guild Sets Bill Creber & Roland Anderson For Hall Of Fame; ‘Planet Of The Apes’, ‘White Christmas’ Among Credits

  • Deadline
Art Director Guild Sets Bill Creber & Roland Anderson For Hall Of Fame; ‘Planet Of The Apes’, ‘White Christmas’ Among Credits
The Art Directors Guild Hall of Fame will be induct William J. Creber – the production designer responsible for, among other achievements, the Statue of Liberty scene in the original Planet of the Apes – and frequent Cecil B. DeMille collaborator Roland Anderson into its ranks at the 24th Annual Art Directors Guild’s Excellence in Production Design Awards next month.

The announcement was made today by President Nelson Coates, Adg and Awards Producer Scott Moses, Adg. The 2020 Awards will be held Saturday, February 1, at the InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown.

Creber, who died last year, is best known for his work on the Irwin Allen disaster movies The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno as well as the first three Planet of the Apes movies. He was Oscar-nominated three times, for The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), The Poseidon Adventure (1972) and The Towering Inferno (1974). He was Emmy-nominated for his work on ABC’s
See full article at Deadline »

Chuck Lorre To Receive Art Directors’ Cinematic Imagery Award

  • Deadline
Chuck Lorre To Receive Art Directors’ Cinematic Imagery Award
Television sitcom hitmaker Chuck Lorre has been tapped to receive the Cinematic Imagery Award from the Art Directors Guild. The honor will be presented February 1 at the guild’s 24th annual Art Directors Guild’ Excellence in Production Design Awards in Los Angeles.

The Adg’s Cinematic Imagery Award is given to those whose body of work in the film and television industry has richly enhanced the visual aspects of the viewer’s experience.

A dominating force in network television over the past two decades, Lorre co-created and serves as executive producer of four series currently on the air, including the acclaimed, award-winning comedies Young Sheldon, Mom, Bob ♥ Abishola, and the Golden Globe Award– winning and three-time Emmy-nominated comedy The Kominsky Method, which stars Michael Douglas and Alan Arkin. The Kominsky Method was also recently nominated again for the 2020 Golden Globes Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy, Best Actor for Douglas,
See full article at Deadline »

Cine Fan will start the new year with the cinematic treasures of Naruse Mikio and Sergei Parajanov

The Hong Kong International Film Festival Society will kick off its 2020 Cine Fan programme with more cinematic gems in its January/February edition, including the delicately sublime dramas of Naruse Mikio and the magical realism-infused romance of Sergei Parajanov.

One of the most prolific and respected masters of Japanese cinema, Naruse Mikio is lauded for his realistic dramas of domestic life and his sympathetic portraits of women. The Cine Fan retrospective, entitled Life is But an Illusion: The Cinema of Naruse Mikio, features 12 of his most iconic works, including some rarely seen outside of Japan. Thematically curated in three separate sections, it showcases Naruse’s uncanny ability in the portrayal of artistic reflection, marital dilemmas and social transformations.

Still from “Flowing”

Under Love/Art, Naruse’s quietly devastating camera captured the dichotomy between artistic excellence and elusive love in his four-film collaboration with the legendary actress Yamada Isuzu in Tsuruhachi
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Julie Andrews Recalls Watching an "Adorable" Fake Orgy

Julie Andrews Recalls Watching an
Julie Andrews just talked about orgys. Now there's a sentence no one expected to read. During an appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show airing Wednesday, the living legend shared a story about a fake sex party she witnessed while on set for the 1979 film 10, directed by her late husband, Blake Edwards and co-starring Bo Derek and Dudley Moore. The sexy topic came up when host Ellen DeGeneres asked Andrews what kind of wild Hollywood parties she and her husband attended in the past. As she said, "The two of you must have gone to, like, crazy parties in the '60s and '70s." Eh, not really. As the star shared, "No, we didn't, really. We didn't...
See full article at E! Online »

‘Bond’, ‘Merchant Of Venice’ producer Nigel Goldsack dies aged 62

  • ScreenDaily
‘Bond’, ‘Merchant Of Venice’ producer Nigel Goldsack dies aged 62
Goldsack also helped develop films with Werner Herzog, Mike Newell and Michael Radford.

London-based producer Nigel Goldsack, whose credits include The Merchant Of Venice and The World Is Not Enough, died suddenly aged 62 on October 18.

Goldsack was born in Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, in 1957 and was involved in film from an early age, working as a runner on Blake EdwardsThe Pink Panther Strikes Again while he was a teenager.

He began his career in the late 1970s as an assistant director on several independent UK films, including Brian Gibson’s rock drama Breaking Glass, Dh Lawrence biopic Priest Of Love starring Ian McKellen,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Legendary Studio Mogul Robert Evans Dead At Age 89

  • CinemaRetro
Evans (right) with Robert Shaw on the set of "Black Sunday" in 1977.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Robert Evans has passed away at age 89. The former actor-turned-studio head had a long, dramatic career that saw him appointed to run Paramount Pictures at the tender age of 36 when the studio was bleeding red ink. Under Evans' management, the studio rebounded, releasing such classics as "Chinatown", "Rosemary's Baby", "The Odd Couple", "True Grit" and, most notably, "The Godfather". Even Evan's non-blockbusters became cult classics. Among them: "Harold and Maude" and "The Italian Job". Other hits brought to the screen by Evans include "Marathon Man" and "Black Sunday". His tumultuous private life was the stuff of Hollywood lore including his seven marriages. Evans' producing career started modestly when he bought the screen rights to the crime thriller "The Detective" by Roderick Thorp. He successfully brought it to the screen in an acclaimed 1968 film starring Frank Sinatra.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

NYC Weekend Watch: Return of MoMA, Downtown Tokyo and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

MoMA has reopened, and it is–I do not say this lightly–almost too much in one weekend. See for yourself.

Film Forum

“Shitamachi: Tales of Downtown Tokyo” begins with both canon and lesser-known Japanese cinema.

Films by Tim Burton and Joseph Losey play this weekend.

Metrograph

Films by Hitchcock and Blake Edwards play this weekend.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Julie Andrews Recalls Husband Blake Edwards’ Battle With Depression

  • Variety
Julie Andrews Recalls Husband Blake Edwards’ Battle With Depression
The line to see Julie Andrews at the 92nd Street Y wrapped around the square of a sprawling New York City block. Seventy years since the start of her career, 60 since she asked “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly?” as Lerner and Loewe’s first Eliza and 50 since she sang “The Sound of Music” before the Eastern Alps — Andrews still draws a crowd.

Her fans gathered Saturday evening to hear her speak about “Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years,” the actress’ second memoir, co-written with daughter Emma Walton Hamilton and chronicling the breadth of her years in the film industry, from “Mary Poppins” to “Victor/Victoria.”

“I was learning on my feet every inch of the way,” she said, joined onstage by her daughter and film scholar Annette Insdorf, who led the talk.

“My background had been vaudeville and musicals, even in the early, early years with that somewhat
See full article at Variety »

Dame Julie Andrews: ‘My biggest disappointment? Losing my singing voice’

The star of stage and screen on painful memories, over-apologising and eating cornflakes in the middle of the night

Born in Surrey, Julie Andrews, 84, began performing at 12. In the 50s, she made her Broadway stage debut in The Boy Friend and then starred in My Fair Lady. She played the title role in the 1964 film Mary Poppins, winning an Academy Award, and in 1965 made The Sound Of Music. Her second memoir, Home Work, has just been published. Andrews raised five children with her late husband, Blake Edwards, and lives on Long Island, New York.

What is your earliest memory?

Sitting on my mother’s lap in the car and, as my father pulled up to our little house in Walton, saying what they tell me is my very first word – home.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blake Edwards: The Fractured Side of Paradise

  • MUBI
Blake Edwards. Courtesy of Paramount.“[Blake] Edwards has become a stylistic influence in the cinema,” Andrew Sarris would write of the filmmaker in 1968, “And his personality and script dominate Ralph Nelson’s Soldier in the Rain the way Lubitsch’s personality once dominated Cukor’s One Hour With You.” Sarris would dub himself an “Edwardian”in his support of the film director and the inclusion of Edwards in his foundational book, The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929–1968, still remains the most serious scholarship on him. Edwards’ distinction in the book included him in “The Far Side of Paradise,” the category that “falls short of Pantheon,” the highest distinction. Edwards would be categorized alongside the likes of Capra, Cukor, Minnelli, Preminger, and Fuller—strong company, but characterized as such for Sarris because there is fragmentation or disruption within their careers. This high distinction by Sarris would have the great film critic come
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Sátántangó,’ Tales of Downtown Tokyo, Blake Edwards & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

Béla Tarr’s monumental Sátántangó has been restored and plays daily.

Film Forum

“Shitamachi: Tales of Downtown Tokyo” begins with both canon and lesser-known Japanese cinema.

Films by Milos Forman and Joseph Losey play this weekend.

Metrograph

A Julie Andrews-curated selection of Blake Edwards films play this weekend.

A series
See full article at The Film Stage »

Julie Andrews Releases Second Memoir On Her Hollywood Years

  • Deadline
Julie Andrews Releases Second Memoir On Her Hollywood Years
Julie Andrews, the Academy Award-winning star of movie classics The Sound of Music and Mary Poppins, has her second memoir out on Tuesday. In Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years (Hachette Books), she talks about her movie career, her learning curve, and the challenges of doing the Poppins flying scenes. Written with daughter Emma Walton Hamilton, the book has several confessions from the star, not all of them flattering

Among the book’s revelations:

*** In her teenage years, she discovered her biological father was a family friend with whom her mother had had an affair. She also notes that her parents were alcoholics, and that her stepfather, Ted Andrews, tried twice to get into bed with her. She fitted a lock on her bedroom door to end his attempts.

*** Her first on-screen love scene in the film The Americanisation Of Emily was with James Garner. She was so
See full article at Deadline »

Peter Sellers movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Pink Panther,’ ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘Being There’

  • Gold Derby
Peter Sellers movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Pink Panther,’ ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘Being There’
September 8, 2019, marks the birthday of actor and comic legend Peter Sellers, who would have turned 94. The British star had achieved acclaim on the stage, in recordings and most famously on the radio, particularly for the “The Goon Show,” the popular comedy series regularly heard on the BBC.

SEEStanley Kubrick movies: All 13 films ranked worst to best

However, it was in film where Sellers achieved his greatest worldwide success. He was nominated for his first Academy Award in 1959 for co-writing and producing the live-action short “The Running Jumping & Standing Still Film.” Sellers also received two other Oscar nominations, as Best Actor for 1964’s “Dr. Strangelove” (from Stanley Kubrick) as well as for 1979’s “Being There” (from Hal Ashby).

SEEHal Ashby movies: All 12 films ranked worst to best

Sellers won the Best Actor Golden Globe for “Being There” and was nominated on five other occasions, including three times for “The Pink Panther
See full article at Gold Derby »

Peter Sellers movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Peter Sellers movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
September 8, 2019, marks the birthday of actor and comic legend Peter Sellers, who would have turned 94. The British star had achieved acclaim on the stage, in recordings and most famously on the radio, particularly for the “The Goon Show,” the popular comedy series regularly heard on the BBC.

However, it was in film where Sellers achieved his greatest worldwide success. He was nominated for his first Academy Award in 1959 for co-writing and producing the live-action short “The Running Jumping & Standing Still Film.” Sellers also received two other Oscar nominations, as Best Actor for 1964’s “Dr. Strangelove” (from Stanley Kubrick) as well as for 1979’s “Being There” (from Hal Ashby).

Sellers won the Best Actor Golden Globe for “Being There” and was nominated on five other occasions, including three times for “The Pink Panther” series (from Blake Edwards) in which he portrayed bumbling Inspector Jacques Clouseau, the role for which he will likely be best remembered.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bill Hader On How ‘Roma’, Blake Edwards & Andrzej Wajda Inspired The Action-Heavy Season 2 Of ‘Barry’ – Emmys

  • Deadline
With four Emmy nominations for his work on Barry this year—comedy series, acting, writing and directing—Season 2 of the HBO series really allowed Bill Hader to show his riveting helming finesse across two episodes: “ronny/lily” and the finale “berkman/block”. In the nominated “ronny/lily”, Hader’s hitman Barry is trying to take out martial arts maven Ronny Proxin, only to be ambushed by the guy’s daughter, Lily, an 11-year-old karate dynamo. It’s a great chase sequence that begins in a smoky, blasé, suburban home, and continues onto the street and into a grocery store. It’s just one example of Hader’s many achievements.

What was the genesis for your Emmy-nominated episode “ronny/lily”? I hear a stunt coordinator recommended child actress Jessie Giacomazzi who knows plenty of karate.

Going into Season 2, we knew that we wanted Loach [John Pirruccello] to work with Fuches [Stephen Root] and corner Barry.
See full article at Deadline »

Oscar-winning animation legend Richard Williams (1933-2019)

Word spread quickly this past Saturday through the world’s animation news outlets, word of the loss of one of the true innovators and greatest masters of the art form. Here’s how Variety reported his passing:

“Renowned animator Richard Williams, best known for his work on “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” died Friday at his home in Bristol, England, Variety has confirmed. He was 86.

Williams was a distinguished animator, director, producer, author and teacher whose work has garnered three Oscars and three BAFTA Awards. In addition to his groundbreaking work as the animation director of “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” Williams also animated the title sequences for the “Pink Panther” franchise and received critical acclaim for his first film “The Little Island” in 1958 and his animated adaptation of “A Christmas Carol” in 1971, for which he won his first Oscar.”

While many sources called him the creator of Roger Rabbit, a character
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Exorcist III is a Classic and Better Than You Remember

Jim Knipfel Aug 16, 2019

Three decades later, we look back at The Exorcist III, which despite everything is much better than most people remember.

Judge me harshly if you will, but I admit without shame that of all the entries in The Exorcist franchise, John Boorman’s 1977 all-star Exorcist II: The Heretic is by far my favorite. Not the greatest or most coherent of the lot, no, but my favorite. In terms of sheer brain-melting horror, I dare you to cite any scene from any of the other entries that can touch the terrifying spectacle of Linda Blair tap dancing. That said, 1990’s The Exorcist III comes in a very close second. It’s a far better film than it has any right to be, and at several turns, it even tops the original…

Based on his 1983 novel Legion, writer-director William Peter Blatty’s Exorcist III arrived 17 years after William Friedkin’s The Exorcist,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blake Edwards movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

Blake Edwards movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Blake Edwards would’ve celebrated his 97th birthday on July 26, 2019. Though best known for his comedies, the Oscar-nominated director dipped his toes into a number of different genres throughout his career, including thrillers, musicals and westerns. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1922, Edwards got his start as an actor before becoming a writer for movies and television. He rose to prominence after creating the TV show “Peter Gunn,” which starred Craig Stevens as a super-stylish detective. The series brought Edwards Emmy nominations for writing and directing in 1959.

He enjoyed his greatest big screen successes with the “Pink Panther” series, featuring Peter Sellers as bumbling French detective Inspector Jacques Clouseau. The films established Edwards as a master of physical comedy and sight gags, which his leading man was more than capable of delivering. The two
See full article at Gold Derby »

Blake Edwards movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Pink Panther,’ ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s,’ ’10’

  • Gold Derby
Blake Edwards movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Pink Panther,’ ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s,’ ’10’
Blake Edwards would’ve celebrated his 97th birthday on July 26, 2019. Though best known for his comedies, the Oscar-nominated director dipped his toes into a number of different genres throughout his career, including thrillers, musicals and westerns. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1922, Edwards got his start as an actor before becoming a writer for movies and television. He rose to prominence after creating the TV show “Peter Gunn,” which starred Craig Stevens as a super-stylish detective. The series brought Edwards Emmy nominations for writing and directing in 1959.

SEEJulie Andrews movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

He enjoyed his greatest big screen successes with the “Pink Panther” series, featuring Peter Sellers as bumbling French detective Inspector Jacques Clouseau. The films established Edwards as a master of physical comedy and sight gags, which his
See full article at Gold Derby »

Locarno Festival to Spotlight Black Cinema From Around The World

  • Variety
Locarno Festival to Spotlight Black Cinema From Around The World
As black filmmakers gain more traction within the Hollywood studio system, the Locarno Film Festival is putting the spotlight on black cinema around the world with a major retrospective titled Black Light set to kick off with Spike Lee’s “Do The Right Thing” freshly restored by Universal in 4K for the landmark race drama’s 30th anniversary.

The more than 40-title Black Light retro spans from Oscar Micheaux’s 1920 silent drama “Within Our Gates,” which is the oldest known surviving film by an African-American director and portrays the struggle of a mixed-race school teacher in the Deep South, to Christopher Harris’s 2000 doc “Still Here” depicting the more recent blight of U.S. neighborhoods inhabited almost exclusively by African Americans.

Titles screening from outside the U.S. comprise Senegalese auteur Osmane Sembene’s 1966 “The black girl from …” based on a Sembene short and considered sub-Saharan Africa’s first feature
See full article at Variety »
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